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Patrick Thomas
PostPosted: Thu Oct 19, 2017 2:22 pm    Post subject:

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I just did another inspection yesterday. It went very well.

I straightened comb and staggered some bars to keep them on the right track of building straight comb.

I also added two empties in the middle section. I spaced them out to where each one was in between straight combs.

I also made sure they had a laying queen. They do, and I got her on film.

https://youtu.be/D_B8xPjaNbw

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Patrick Thomas
PostPosted: Tue Oct 03, 2017 9:30 pm    Post subject:

biobee wrote:
I have thought about doing this kind of thing, so I'm glad to see someone actually do it!

I think you are going to run into condensation problems, but you may be fine just with a top entrance.

Looking forward to see how this develops.



Yes, Phil, thank you.

I agree that these issues (and more) will probably arise, especially depending on what time of year, but thus far I've been lucky and they've been doing great.

An inspection today with only the front cover off.

Very brief and non-invasive.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W9gHlIHhY_M


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biobee
PostPosted: Mon Oct 02, 2017 12:42 pm    Post subject:

I have thought about doing this kind of thing, so I'm glad to see someone actually do it!

I think you are going to run into condensation problems, but you may be fine just with a top entrance.

Looking forward to see how this develops.
Patrick Thomas
PostPosted: Sat Sep 30, 2017 2:07 pm    Post subject:

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Barbara, thanks so much the input, albeit very sobering, lol.

I think the top entrance holes have been the saving-grace as far as moisture being able to escape. We'll see how this plays out as time goes on.

Regarding the detritus at the bottom, I realize it's too early to tell, but they've been keeping it under control thus far. Again, this is an experiment and early in the game, so your warning about this particular issue definitely has my ears perked up.

One positive thing I noticed is that they had about 15-20 small hive beetles corralled in a small bunch in the inside of the outer cover near the entrance holes. I was able to massacre them very easily when I took the outer cover off. I didn't see any beetles in the actual hive, so this design may be an unintended barrier for them.

But I'll do periodic updates on this thread and I'll be sure to address the points you brought up each time I do.

Thanks, Barbara, for the input. Smile

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Barbara
PostPosted: Sat Sep 30, 2017 9:20 am    Post subject:

Thanks for that Patrick.

It is amazing to see the beautiful combs/nest so clearly exposed to view and the bees relatively calm about it.
I am surprised that there is not more condensation in the hive. Have you made any allowance/provision for moisture puddling in the bottom? My experience with plastic planter hives was that moisture condensed on the impermeable walls and ran down into the bottom. Debris from the combs (wax cappings, pollen dead bees etc) fell into it and started to rot and the stench attracted flies which laid their eggs in it until there was a disgusting, seething, rotting mess.... Ick! I cut a large hole in the base of the next one and covered it in mesh, to enable it to drain.
I appreciate your climate is somewhat different to ours but since I believe you have quite high humidity in Florida, I thought it might still be an issue, particularly once they start ripening honey in there.

Regards

Barbara
Patrick Thomas
PostPosted: Fri Sep 29, 2017 6:49 pm    Post subject: Aquarium Top Bar Hive Inspection

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Some of you may be interested in viewing this rather short video of an inspection I did today (9-29-17) of my aquarium observation top bar hive,

Enjoy. Smile

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0dRApI09IQ


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