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beekeeping forum
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  Topic: Searching for a source of 'packaged' bees in the U.K.
peopleshive

Replies: 8
Views: 9650

PostForum: Horizontal top bar hives   Posted: Tue Aug 11, 2015 10:48 am   Subject: Searching for a source of 'packaged' bees in the U.K.
Just to add to all the excellent advice above ...

Swarms must be far and away the best way to start a hive (from the bees perspective, that is) - at the right point in the season, of course.

U ...
  Topic: Is colony on the way out?
peopleshive

Replies: 6
Views: 6094

PostForum: Beginners start here   Posted: Thu Jun 25, 2015 7:39 pm   Subject: Is colony on the way out?
Alan,
One thing I do that can take some of the guesswork out of knowing what is going on in a colony is to put round 'port-hole' windows in the front of each box. Very easy to make with a hole saw. ...
  Topic: Who on biobees is treatment-free?
peopleshive

Replies: 134
Views: 163935

PostForum: Bee health: the treatment (or not) of bee pests and diseases   Posted: Tue Jun 09, 2015 5:11 pm   Subject: Who on biobees is treatment-free?
Interesting discussion - I've often wondered about this too. Up in Scotland my Warrés and Japanese-style hybrids grow only slowly, so the oldest comb in the top box is often several seasons old. For ...
  Topic: Bees pollinating Scotch Broom
peopleshive

Replies: 3
Views: 4115

PostForum: Photo gallery   Posted: Thu May 28, 2015 8:15 pm   Subject: Bees pollinating Scotch Broom
Great video - thanks. You've solved the mystery of the orange-yellow dusted bees that I see in rural and suburban hives. Since we're in Scotland we just call it 'Broom'!

Andy
  Topic: Bees foraging on hen feed
peopleshive

Replies: 6
Views: 7045

PostForum: Environmental issues, GM, pesticides and campaigning   Posted: Tue Dec 09, 2014 12:18 pm   Subject: Bees foraging on hen feed
After reading that second reference of Adam's I think we can probably assume that cheap almonds might not be so abundant before long anyway...

As an alternative, if you have space to grow them, Bar ...
  Topic: Eva Crane, The World History of Honey Hunting and Beekeeping
peopleshive

Replies: 4
Views: 5358

PostForum: Beekeeping Book and Product Reviews   Posted: Wed Nov 05, 2014 9:16 pm   Subject: Eva Crane, The World History of Honey Hunting and Beekeeping
No argument there, Phil. I should have written 'unlike the case for domesticated animals'.

Andy
  Topic: Eva Crane, The World History of Honey Hunting and Beekeeping
peopleshive

Replies: 4
Views: 5358

PostForum: Beekeeping Book and Product Reviews   Posted: Tue Nov 04, 2014 9:56 pm   Subject: Eva Crane, The World History of Honey Hunting and Beekeeping
So humans and bees have clearly not co-evolved, unlike other domesticated animals.

Thanks for posting this Adam. Fascinating stuff.

Andy
  Topic: thermal research - need advice on VERY tall warre
peopleshive

Replies: 20
Views: 18639

PostForum: Bright ideas, experiments and projects   Posted: Mon Nov 03, 2014 8:27 pm   Subject: thermal research - need advice on VERY tall warre
Hi Derek,

I am intrigued by your experiment. It will certainly be a hive that pleases the bees (but may prove unwieldy if you plan on any manipulations)

One way of making sure they get the righ ...
  Topic: Traditional Japanese hive or "pseudo-skep"
peopleshive

Replies: 22
Views: 31950

PostForum: Photo gallery   Posted: Tue Jul 01, 2014 7:36 pm   Subject: Traditional Japanese hive or "pseudo-skep"
I'll send you a pm Adam.

Andy
  Topic: Traditional Japanese hive or "pseudo-skep"
peopleshive

Replies: 22
Views: 31950

PostForum: Photo gallery   Posted: Mon Jun 30, 2014 2:20 pm   Subject: Traditional Japanese hive or "pseudo-skep"
Hi Adam - Good work with your Japanese Hive! There are quite a few of us interested in these now. It's interesting that several of us are converging on similar solutions to the problems of visualis ...
  Topic: Very busy drones...
peopleshive

Replies: 14
Views: 12814

PostForum: Beginners start here   Posted: Wed Jun 25, 2014 5:14 pm   Subject: Very busy drones...
Johno wondered where all his drones are going. In one of the standard popular textbooks (The Biology of the Honey Bee, 1987, Harvard) Winston notes that "matings commonly occur between drones an ...
  Topic: Condensation and varroa! Missing link to survivalists
peopleshive

Replies: 228
Views: 384467

PostForum: Bee health: the treatment (or not) of bee pests and diseases   Posted: Tue Apr 01, 2014 8:17 pm   Subject: Condensation and varroa! Missing link to survivalists
Hi Steve,

I must admit I don't like putting non-food approved substances into hives. Not sure what the dye in meths is. (One rule of thumb (from David Heaf, I think) is: "If you wouldn't pu ...
 
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Conserving wild bees

Research suggests that bumble bee boxes have a very low success rate in actually attracting bees into them. We find that if you create an environment where first of all you can attract mice inside, such as a pile of stones, a drystone wall, paving slabs with intentionally made cavities underneath, this will increase the success rate.

Most bumble bee species need a dry space about the size a football, with a narrow entrance tunnel approximately 2cm in diameter and 20 cm long. Most species nest underground along the base of a linear feature such as a hedge or wall. Sites need to be sheltered and out of direct sunlight.

There is a spectacular display of wild bee hotels here

More about bumblebees and solitary bees here

Information about the Tree Bumblebee (Bombus hypnorum)

Barefoot Beekeeper Podcast



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