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Any problem with having hive next to a building?

 
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GentlemanHomestead
New Bee


Joined: 13 Feb 2014
Posts: 2
Location: Ohio

PostPosted: Thu Feb 13, 2014 8:13 pm    Post subject: Any problem with having hive next to a building? Reply with quote

Hi everyone, new guy here.

Is there a problem with setting up a couple hives right outside a garage or small shed? Is there a danger the colony will leave the designated hive and prefer living in the shed? If so, how far from structures are ideal?

I have plenty of deciduous wooded area where I can place bees, but wonder how far away from any structures would be best.

Unfortunately I think the BEST location (in a corner of the vegetable garden next to a small garden pond) will not be possible due to my wife's objection since nothing can convince her they won't swarm and kill her. Sad Trying to educate her in a productive way! Smile

So since she enjoys being in the garden, I'm going to try housing them on the other side of the property where they'll be out of her sight.
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J Smith
Foraging Bee


Joined: 13 Jan 2014
Posts: 169
Location: New Zealand, South Island, Southland, Riversdale.

PostPosted: Thu Feb 13, 2014 8:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Welcome to the fray. Very Happy
I see no problem with placing the hive/hives next to structure, if the entrances face away from the obstruction of the structure wall, there is sufficient sunlight (especially morning sun), they are not in direct dark shade for a good proportion of the day and there is still good air flow around/through the hive.
If the structure in question is not too far from the pond, the bees will find it, if not you might look at placing a bird feeder or the like closer to the hive to let the bees have easy access to clean water.
Once a new swarm or nuc are established and fanning at the entrance to your new hive and the queen is inside they should be happy with their new home and have no reason to move house into the structure...... until they send out a swarm of their own.... then maybe some will find a suitable space within the structure.

Personally I would place the hives a few feet from the structure to allow working space around the entire hive and allowance to maintain the surrounding ground, but still use the structure for windbreak and reflected sunlight.
If the structure is between the hive and your house it will cause them to climb higher in the air when foraging and form flight paths over your house rather than around it, helping calm you better halves fears of attack.

Good idea to introduce the hive some distance from your wife's gardening activity until she learns that not everything yellow/black striped is "out to get her". Once she learns and sees the benefit of having honey bees around she will come to accept their presence and when you are ready to perform a split or capture a natural swarm from your first hive, you might just get to place a new hive in the corner of the vegetable garden next to the pond. Wink
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rmcpb
Scout Bee


Joined: 17 Jul 2011
Posts: 447
Location: Blue Mountains, NSW, Australia

PostPosted: Thu Feb 13, 2014 8:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good advice from the Kiwi Smile
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Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1582
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2014 11:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have 6 colonies within 15 feet of my back door. All my visitors use the back door without problem.
I would not want to keep them anywhere else because I can monitor their activity easily throughout the year.... you learn a lot more if you can see them flying every day several times a day.... and can more easily spot a problem before it becomes terminal. Mostly though for pure pleasure. The sight, sound and smell is just good for the soul and being able to indulge that on your doorstep is worth an awful lot. I have kept them there for 15 years and not had a problem with swarms coming into the buildings. That said, we have stone walls and no real cavities, so there are no particularly attractive and suitable sized structures for them to colonise.
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GentlemanHomestead
New Bee


Joined: 13 Feb 2014
Posts: 2
Location: Ohio

PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2014 4:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the responses everyone. Glad to know it's at least unlikely the bees will decide to prefer our shed rather than their hive.
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