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Bait hives

 
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Smorning
Foraging Bee


Joined: 20 Aug 2013
Posts: 150
Location: Faversham Kent UK

PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2014 8:05 pm    Post subject: Bait hives Reply with quote

I have two hTBH's to populate and intend to do this by either

A - setting up a bait hive using the normal lures, I have a spare national brood body and have top bars that fit perfectly. So I was thinking that I could use this as a bait box as the bees will not be in in the box too long am I right in assuming that they will not have time to join combs to the side of the national box so should be easy to transfer to the hTBH

Or

B - by using a national brood box with alternate top bars and move when they have developed comb and brood on the top bars

Or

C - doing a chop and crop and placing direct into the hTBH

Or

D - getting a swarm and placing direct I to the hTBH

From the collective experience on the forum I would greatly appreciate any views on the best option with hopefully the lowest level of sacrifice of brood all views welcomed. As I have not used a hTBH before I have no drawn out comb unfortunately. I think option D would be the best (I am on the swarm list in my area) but I suspect one of the other options may be necessary.

PS I have three nationals on the go at present however I really want to migrate to a more natural balanced approach in 2014
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AugustC
Silver Bee


Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Fri Apr 25, 2014 7:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

To answer in a similar vein, you could:
A) do D) this is ideal though time sensitive. I never seem to be around when a swarm is.
B) do A) Although they probably won't attach to the side you can't be sure but you could always put some boards inside the brood box to make it the kTBH internal shape.
C) Build a kTBH bait hive. Very quick and easy from almost any scrap wood.

For brood comb to include in the bait hives it doesn't have to be a full comb.
Someone kindly gave me a piece of brood comb from their national to get me going and I cut it into triangles which I attached to topbars using some wax and a soldering iron. You only need a small amount some can do a lot from a single comb.

best of luck
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mannanin
Scout Bee


Joined: 25 Feb 2009
Posts: 259
Location: Essex. UK.

PostPosted: Fri Apr 25, 2014 8:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

"PS I have three nationals on the go at present however I really want to migrate to a more natural balanced approach in 2014"

Option D is by far the best option. As you already have those three nationals, you have your potential swarms. Just leave them to keep building up (no swarm prevention) and surely you will get at least one swarm, probably more including casts. Of course you may not catch those swarms, do you feel lucky?
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Adam Rose
Silver Bee


Joined: 09 Oct 2011
Posts: 582
Location: Manchester, UK

PostPosted: Fri Apr 25, 2014 12:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe a combination, say B + D ?
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mal
Nurse Bee


Joined: 11 Jul 2013
Posts: 44
Location: Rutland, Leicestershire, UK

PostPosted: Mon Apr 28, 2014 11:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi- as a first timer I have just performed B - ie installed 3 modified top bars to and now transferred from a National.

Even though I put the top bars in the hive far too early in the season (ie they were built up and loaded well before that or other local hives had drones) and therefore had them in the hive for a couple of extra weeks, they were full of 'National frame shape' square comb, the bracing to sides was minimal and easy to cut through when removing them.

My only problem was very careful manipulation whilst trimming them to fit the TBH as they were so heavy and potential to break off top bar was high. [I had a week earlier broken one off and had to start that bar again]

If I did it again, my 3 modified top bars would have a TBH shaped guide added to it (removable) so that if they were fully built out the core of the comb was supported during removal and manipulation. ie could just run a knife quickly inside the proforma guide, remove the guide and drop it into the TBH.

Mal
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