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Releasing the queen... when?

 
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ZoltanO
Nurse Bee


Joined: 15 Apr 2010
Posts: 32
Location: USA, KY, Morehead

PostPosted: Thu Apr 15, 2010 2:28 am    Post subject: Releasing the queen... when? Reply with quote

This is my first venture into bees. I built three TBH and populated them with package bees. I was curious about when it is best to release the queen. I've noticed some posts that mention direct release, three days, or let the queen release herself. I'm confused...

Also, I have found a couple of bees on the ground seemingly unable to fly. Should I be concerned? It is so few in comparison to the large ball of bees I poured in and all others seem to be carrying on normal activity (at least to my expectations). They seem quite busy during the day flying out and in. It appears to be going well. Being curious, I had to peek and found that they were already building comb. I am very excited, but will try to contain myself and leave them alone a while.

Thanks in advance for any replies and for making this a great resource.

Zoltan
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Sally
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 17, 2010 9:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm glad you posted. I am finding it hard to leave them alone! I just installed my first TBH as well. 2nd day. They are going in and out and when the sun comes out, they increase in sound and activity. I find a heck of a lot of them around the opening holes on the wall, walking around and seemingly waiting in line. I opened all 3 holes because they had some back up and they are not so many clustered on the outside. I'm not going to look inside until 2 weeks, I have an observation window so that helps but the little buggers got into that and the scouts (I think) get mad if you go to the back side of the hive so I'm leaving that alone for now. I just watch them and wonder what the H. they are bringing back because I'm not seeing pollen on their legs, but boy are they busy! Good luck to you and hopefully we both can stay out of the hive for a bit.
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ZoltanO
Nurse Bee


Joined: 15 Apr 2010
Posts: 32
Location: USA, KY, Morehead

PostPosted: Sun Apr 18, 2010 1:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good to hear from you Sally.

It's been a week now for my hives and I've been good Very Happy

The bees coming and going at first had no pollen, but in the last few days I've noticed many coming in with yellow and orange leggings. Some had such a build up I was surprised they could fly like that.

It was cooler and windy earlier today, so there wasn't as much activity as on previous days. But, I noticed them coming in loaded down later in the day. As it continued to get a little warmer, they were crowding the entrances.

I had thought of putting in an observation window and may do so on a future hive. I had also thought of a wireless "BeeCam", lol. Right now, I am satisfied to sit back and watch the activity from the outside, mesmerized by the amazing little creatures.
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Garret
Golden Bee


Joined: 04 Apr 2009
Posts: 1681
Location: Canada, BC, Delta

PostPosted: Sun Apr 18, 2010 1:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If the package of bees and queen have been in the package for more than three days you could direct release. By then the worker bees have excepted the queen. Any earlier than that you want the workers to release her over a three day period. It takes about three days for the worker bees to except their new and strange queen as their own.

They will collect water and nectar to start. Once the queen has started to lay and eggs are hatching they need to collect pollen. It's a good sign that all is well in the hive.
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ZoltanO
Nurse Bee


Joined: 15 Apr 2010
Posts: 32
Location: USA, KY, Morehead

PostPosted: Sun Apr 18, 2010 1:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Garret! That's very reassuring. It makes it easier to leave them alone knowing that.
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Sally
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 19, 2010 5:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes Thanks that is very helpful. Mine were in the package 2 days so that is a good thing to know.

I'm glad Zoltano you've had them going a week and have been good Very Happy . I'm inspired to do the same.

And how gratifying to see balls of pollen on them! Mine are just dusty, maybe whatever they're bringing back is black or some mysterious invisible pollen, but they seem to be bringing a lot of that back.

Observation windows are cool, but still won't open them until they settle down. They seem to have posted some less friendly members of the tribe back there Smile
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lsinger4
New Bee


Joined: 07 Mar 2010
Posts: 1
Location: USA, North Carolina, Chapel Hill

PostPosted: Wed Apr 21, 2010 3:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I installed my first 2 packages into 2 homemade tbhs on Saturday. The queens were not shipped in the package, so I did not direct release. Today, 3rd day inspection, there were 30~40 bees on the queen cage, but she was still not released. How do you distinguish between the workers wanting to release the queen v. attack her? I have read to look for aggressive behavior, such as trying to attack the screen, but do not know what this would look like. Both queen cages are covered by similar number of bees, so I think all is well. I plan to check again on Friday and release them if they have not found their way out.
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Bleith
Guard Bee


Joined: 05 Apr 2014
Posts: 51
Location: West Dundee, IL. USA

PostPosted: Fri Apr 18, 2014 5:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would like to revisit this 4 year thread. I have installed a package with a queen into my TBH. I have the queen hanging in the middle between 3 bars. It has been 4 days and I have not opened up the top bar(s) yet to see if she is free. I do have an observation window and about twice a day i look into it, Morning and evening. It appears at that time they are completely clustered around the queen. Should I jsut let it be? Or should I check to see if she is free? If so, any suggestions on the best time of day to do so?
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R Payne
Foraging Bee


Joined: 11 Apr 2011
Posts: 123
Location: USA, Kansas, Wichita

PostPosted: Sat Apr 19, 2014 3:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I expect you can check to see if she is free and if not then free her and remove the queen cage. When I did a package I think I released her on the 3rd day.

ron
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Bleith
Guard Bee


Joined: 05 Apr 2014
Posts: 51
Location: West Dundee, IL. USA

PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2014 5:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Update. I checked yesterday and my queen is no longer in the cage. I removed the queen cage and shut everything back up. Hopefully all is well and they will start building comb if they haven't already
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Michupi
New Bee


Joined: 03 May 2014
Posts: 3
Location: Midwest

PostPosted: Sat May 03, 2014 2:47 pm    Post subject: Newbies new bees...where's the queen? Reply with quote

Hi Y'all. I just picked up my new package bees on April 30th. I hung the queen inside. The cage was corked on both ends. I did not look at it closely when I did so. This morning I was going to let out the queen...but there was no queen in the cage...just a couple of attendants?? I made a couple if mistakes which I believe I corrected.

First, after successfully dumping them into the hive...I did not put in the rest of the frames. I let the can feeder in there because it still had a lot of sugar water in it. This morning as I lifted up the inner cover I saw them balling from the top of the inner cover. By then I had read about the importance of keeping all the frames in there from the very beginning.

I put all the frames back in and am using a bottom feeder now. I was supposed to have a marked queen so I could identify her, but did not see her at all. Should I be concerned. The bees seem o.k., but then again, I don't know what I am looking at or for. They are eating a lot and seem to be making a little comb.

Please advise
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biobee
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 1055
Location: UK, England, S. Devon

PostPosted: Mon May 05, 2014 10:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Given the unlikelihood of the bees having pulled out a cork for the queen to escape and then replacing it, it sounds like they didn't send you a queen at all.

I suggest you contact your supplier immediately and ask them to send one.

Meanwhile, could you please amend your location to show a real place, please? Thanks!
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Bleith
Guard Bee


Joined: 05 Apr 2014
Posts: 51
Location: West Dundee, IL. USA

PostPosted: Mon May 05, 2014 12:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When I received my package with a queen, I was advised to remove the cork from the queen cage and replace it with a small marshmallow. The Idea is that it would take 2-3 days for the bees to free and during that time become accustomed to her. It seems to have worked well for me. I don't think the queen or any other bee would have been able to remove that cork. Biobee is probably right
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