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Farmer spraying now what?

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> URGENT Help needed now!
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AugustC
Silver Bee


Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Tue May 13, 2014 2:48 pm    Post subject: Farmer spraying now what? Reply with quote

I have just got a text from the farmer who runs the HUGE field of oil seed rape next to my hive. Apparently they are spraying the crop tomorrow morning (no time given).

I think I would be best to head over after bee bedtime and block up the hive entrance. Do I need to put on some 1:1 syrup just to keep them busy tomorrow? I won't be able to unblock the entrance again until 6pm-ish.

Any advice gratefully received.

PS. never posted in the URGENT section before, feels quite dramatic Smile
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Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1564
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Tue May 13, 2014 3:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, definitely block them in tonight and make sure they have sufficient ventilation for tomorrow as it is forecast to be warm and sunny most of the day. ie mesh over the entrance holes or open mesh floor. Assuming they have some nectar/honey stored already(in other words, they are not currently starving) then I would not give them syrup. The rest of the week is going to be fine, so they will be able to make up for whatever they use during the following days.
Do you know what he is spraying with? Such a worry when you have bees so close to such a crop but at least you have been given warning.

Good luck

Barbara
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Tue May 13, 2014 4:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do not give syrup! NOT.

Top ventilation mesh needed as well as open mesh bottom. Do put a sponge sucked with water on the mesh on the top ventilation mesh. It is best to give another empty super so the can get off the comb. Top ventilation must be covered, so no light shines on the bees. Bees run to the light and clogg the mesh otherwise. Keep them dark and ventilated, provide for water. A sponge holds water best.
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AugustC
Silver Bee


Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Tue May 13, 2014 6:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you both.
it is a kTBH Bernard.
I managed to get back early from work so I could go in and cbeck if they had plenty of food and space. Well they certainly do they also have LOTS of drone brood. There are Drones strolling about on the comb and queen cups. There were only a few and they seemed quite small (though my bees are quite small). None were capped but they did look complete, I couldn't see any larva in there. How long do you think before a swarm?

I still can't spot the queen in the hive she is very shy. This is as shame as i wanted to do a proper artificial swarm giving a brood break to the old queens colony. Will have to use Phil comb pairing trick next time.

I lowered the bottom board to give some additional ventilation through the mesh. Took the opportunity to check the bottom board which hasn't been off since september. Lots of pollen, wax flakes and I managed to find two whole varoa. One still attached to a dead bee.

I will head over later and block up the entrance. Hopefully I can convince my wife to go over at lunchtime to unblock it.
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trekmate
Golden Bee


Joined: 30 Nov 2009
Posts: 1123
Location: UK, North Yorkshire, Bentham

PostPosted: Wed May 14, 2014 6:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

AugustC wrote:
I still can't spot the queen in the hive she is very shy. This is as shame as i wanted to do a proper artificial swarm giving a brood break to the old queens colony. Will have to use Phil comb pairing trick next time.

Walkaway split - Combs with eggs, food & brood in each hive. Position each hive entrance about 2 feet either side of original hive entrance position. One hive has queen and carries on. The other has eggs and produces new queen. Flying bees return to find entrance gone and search to find one or other entrance smelling like home, so flying bees are shared. After 24 hours, observe entrances. If flying bees are not roughly balanced, move hive with lowest number towards original hive entrance position and busier hive away (about 6 inches should do it).

The only way I do it as I struggle to locate the queen and it's quick.

One half gets the brood break, the other may need treating if Varroa count is high.
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mannanin
Scout Bee


Joined: 25 Feb 2009
Posts: 260
Location: Essex. UK.

PostPosted: Wed May 14, 2014 8:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, I agree with Trekmate. Just do a split exactly as described. No need to find the queen, simplicity in itself.
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AugustC
Silver Bee


Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Wed May 14, 2014 9:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This was indeed my back up plan.
I was really hoping to provide the colony with a brood break though AND I wanted to transfer fully to a new hive. I think I will just go the way you say though.

Since there are queen cups and no larvae I take it I have at least 4-5 days before cells are capped and the swarm emerges?? Is this right?
This would mean I could do the split on Saturday morning.
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trekmate
Golden Bee


Joined: 30 Nov 2009
Posts: 1123
Location: UK, North Yorkshire, Bentham

PostPosted: Wed May 14, 2014 5:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The page I use for reminders for all the numbers is http://www.bushfarms.com/beesmath.htm

From that you'll see that if there's no larvae you have 8 days. Hope you didn't miss any! Confused
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