Please support Friends of the Bees to keep this forum free to use.

Natural Beekeeping International Forum
low-cost, low-impact, balanced beekeeping for everyone

 Forum FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileYour Profile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Please Read The Rules before posting.



(country selected automatically - UK/USA/CA/AU)
Need to move my spare hive, but there are wasps in it.

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> URGENT Help needed now!
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
nutclough
Nurse Bee


Joined: 22 Apr 2010
Posts: 44
Location: UK West Yorkshire Hebden Bridge

PostPosted: Mon May 26, 2014 7:30 pm    Post subject: Need to move my spare hive, but there are wasps in it. Reply with quote

Hi everyone,
Just got home late to a swarm (third this month) in my garden. I'll need a scaffold tower to get it from the tree, but my main problem is that my final spare hive needs to be moved and I've just discovered a wasp nest in it. It's not very big, about 4 inches across but I'm allergic to wasp stings.

Any ideas?

I've considered emptying the swarm into the TBH anyway and seeing what happens, but the hive is on a grumpy persons land and I should have moved it off months ago.

Also, how long can you keep a swarm in a cardboard box before putting them in their new hive? Do you need to do it the same evening that you catch them?

Thanks.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dexter's shed
Scout Bee


Joined: 16 May 2014
Posts: 307
Location: Grays, Essex, UK

PostPosted: Mon May 26, 2014 9:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

get someone who aint allergic or scared, wait until its dark, then with gloves on an a plastic bag, simply place bag over nest and pull the neck tight with a zip tie, remove as far away as possible, then either destroy the wasp's or release and run

have done quite a few this way in roof voids
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
nutclough
Nurse Bee


Joined: 22 Apr 2010
Posts: 44
Location: UK West Yorkshire Hebden Bridge

PostPosted: Mon May 26, 2014 10:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks.

I've decided that there are enough colonies in my garden for now and have found two possible homes.

One would involve moving the wasps and taking the hive to someone's garden, tomorrow (or tomorrow night). The other would be to simply use an empty top bar in the next town.

If we go for option one, I'm still looking for an answer to how long can a swarm live in a cardboard box for?

I think we'll probably go for option 2 which may be less disruption for the bees and the wasps.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dexter's shed
Scout Bee


Joined: 16 May 2014
Posts: 307
Location: Grays, Essex, UK

PostPosted: Tue May 27, 2014 2:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

nutclough wrote:


If we go for option one, I'm still looking for an answer to how long can a swarm live in a cardboard box for?



as short a time as possible, think about it, they will start building comb, that may or may not fall off from cardboard, you may not be able to transfer it over to a hive,
they may not like living in a box, and leave, a large plastic flower pot with top bars laid across the top and a small entrance cut out would be better than a box, top bars could then be transferred into a TBH with comb attached, am sure phil did a video of such a set up if your search for it
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
J Smith
Foraging Bee


Joined: 13 Jan 2014
Posts: 169
Location: New Zealand, South Island, Southland, Riversdale.

PostPosted: Tue May 27, 2014 4:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Theoretically, it is possible for bees to live in a cardboard box- until either the weather or the bees chewing on it makes the box fall apart.
Not really a long term solution- hived as soon as possible is the best bet, before they start making comb.

Good advice re: plastic bag and wasp nest. Only thing I would add is, if approaching at night in the dark, use a red lens (red cellophane over a head lamp)as wasps can get a bit defensive around white light at night. You could place the sealed bag in the freezer to dispose of the living contents.
Not sure what type of wasps you have, but we have German wasps here that visit hives, kill bees and cart them back home to feed the kids..... so cohabitation is not an ideal scenario.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dexter's shed
Scout Bee


Joined: 16 May 2014
Posts: 307
Location: Grays, Essex, UK

PostPosted: Tue May 27, 2014 10:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

phil's flower pot idea

http://youtu.be/MUWsB5DjTrU
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> URGENT Help needed now! All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

SPECIAL OFFER FOR UK FORUM MEMBERS - Buy your protective clothing here and get a special 15% discount! (use the code BAREFOOTBEEKEEPER at checkout and be sure to 'update basket')



Are the big energy companies bleeding you dry?


Is way too much of your hard-earned family income going up in smoke?

Are you worried about what could happen if the ageing grid system fails?

You need to watch this short video NOW to find out how YOU can cut your energy bills TO THE BONE within 30 days!

WATCH THE VIDEO NOW



(country selected automatically - UK/USA/CA/AU)

Conserving wild bees

Research suggests that bumble bee boxes have a very low success rate in actually attracting bees into them. We find that if you create an environment where first of all you can attract mice inside, such as a pile of stones, a drystone wall, paving slabs with intentionally made cavities underneath, this will increase the success rate.

Most bumble bee species need a dry space about the size a football, with a narrow entrance tunnel approximately 2cm in diameter and 20 cm long. Most species nest underground along the base of a linear feature such as a hedge or wall. Sites need to be sheltered and out of direct sunlight.

There is a spectacular display of wild bee hotels here

More about bumblebees and solitary bees here

Information about the Tree Bumblebee (Bombus hypnorum)

Barefoot Beekeeper Podcast



Now available from Lulu.com


Now available from Lulu.com


Now available from Lulu.com


4th Edition paperback now available from Lulu.com

See beekeeping books for details and links to ebook versions.
site map
php. BB © 2001, 2005 php. BB Group

View topic - Need to move my spare hive, but there are wasps in it. - Natural Beekeeping Network Forum