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Misc. hive help

 
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AugustC
Silver Bee


Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Thu Jun 26, 2014 1:29 pm    Post subject: Misc. hive help Reply with quote

I have recently housed what appears to be a prime swarm and they have messed up their comb building on frames (or at least I have as I didn't attach the starter strips properly). They were in a 6 frame nuc. They are now in a 12 frame national brood.
Order:
empty frame
4 frame mess
empty frame
mostly built frame
empty frame
partially built frame
empty frame
dummy board
empty frame

The hive has an ecofloor, overcovered with varroa mesh, and a fully insulated overlapping roof. There are (for my experience) a lot of bees in this for the amount of comb. They have been there for no more than a week and half maximum. I am thinking the easiest way of sorting this out would be to put another brood underneath (this time with properly attached starter strips) and let them build down and put stores in the top brood box. Would this work or am I setting them an impossible task for this time of year.
locality info: Poppies on their way out Blackberries on their way in. Hives surrounded by lots of brambles. A number of large lime trees in the village about to come into bloom. Some lavender about, still in bloom.
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Thu Jun 26, 2014 2:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Move all empty frames out to the sides of the broodnest or you will end up with a real mess.

Do not interweave empty frames between brood combs. Number one rule.
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AugustC
Silver Bee


Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Thu Jun 26, 2014 2:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ok Bernhard will do. This has worked on my other framed hive, but they did have nice straight comb to start with.

My main question is whether the nadiring another brood box would work or am i setting them up to fail by giving them too much to achieve before winter?
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Dexter's shed
Scout Bee


Joined: 16 May 2014
Posts: 307
Location: Grays, Essex, UK

PostPosted: Thu Jun 26, 2014 2:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

yup, no point having a frame behind a dummy board, I'd move all good partial frames to one end, then those four messed up ones, cut the comb out and set it straight using elastic bands, then your empty frames, if theres not a lot of stores, stick a feeder on top with 1;1 sugaer syrup, to help them with new comb building
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johno
Guard Bee


Joined: 08 Jun 2014
Posts: 60
Location: Limerick, Ireland

PostPosted: Thu Jun 26, 2014 8:06 pm    Post subject: Re: Misc. hive help Reply with quote

AugustC wrote:

The hive has an ecofloor, overcovered with varroa mesh, and a fully insulated overlapping roof.


I'd love to hear more about the ecofloor for the national hive. Do you have a link to a drawing that I could look at? If not, a photo or 2 would be very helpful.

I've seen several earwigs during inspections at our association apiary which I think is very interesting.

thanks,

johno
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AugustC
Silver Bee


Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Fri Jun 27, 2014 10:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am afraid there isn't much to see. It just looks like a deep hive stand.
I made a box out of 110mm wide, 22mm thick wood. The bottom has 10mm mesh to allow excess moisture to escape. This is filled with woodchips. Then there is a standard varroa mesh on top of that. The varroa mesh isn't essential, I put it on so they don't build comb down in to the ecofloor as the woodchips rot down. I think I will make a few bee sized holes in the mesh so they can get down there and patrol the full hive environment. Oh .. and it has four legs Smile

I will be doing an ecofloor for my warré at some point. I am thinking all i really need to do is have some breeze block stood on their sides making a square to stand the hive on and fill the area in the middle with woodchips. Not sure it needs to be on legs at all. We have very sandy soil and as a result zero flooding so I think this should be ok.
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