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Would you ever go for this?

 
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mrwaltner
House Bee


Joined: 15 Sep 2012
Posts: 15
Location: Mt Gambier, SA, Australia

PostPosted: Sun Nov 23, 2014 8:34 am    Post subject: Would you ever go for this? Reply with quote

I had someone tell me recently that they go through a lot of honey every year, but they don't want to learn to take care of bees. What they want is to buy some of my hives and have me manage and extract the honey from them. They're wondering if it would be worth it, economically.

It's sort of a tough question for me. I do cold-pressed organic honey ("raw", although I realize that is a word much debated these days) from warre hives (that I build myself from local timber) and I'm planning on being commercial (or making a living at it, at least). Unlike many other beekeepers who sell large amount of cheap honey and then make money by pollinating crops, the bulk of my income is from the honey (nearly $30/kg, and I sell out fast). I assume that the person asking the question wants raw honey at a cheaper price.

I can name a price for a hive, and I could give an hourly rate, I suppose. Anyone have any experience with a situation like this? If I'm managing someone else's hive, what are the legal implications? The whole thing just feels messy to me.
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madasafish
Silver Bee


Joined: 29 Apr 2009
Posts: 880
Location: Stoke On Trent

PostPosted: Sun Nov 23, 2014 9:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My advice is simple:

After a few weeks doing things that annoy you, and knowing you will not enjoy the benefit.. charging a fixed annual rate will make you count the hours and not do a proper job.

Estimate the likely number of hours/week you will need to work and the number of weeks. Calculate what sum of money will induce you to work for that period... Work out your hourly rate.
Assume you will pay tax on it. So gross it up.

Calculate the total value. Add 10% for things going wrong.

Quote that as a weekly payment.

Oh and add the likely costs of any materials needed..

If they take it, you'll feel happy at the sum. If they don't you will not be trapped in an underpaying job you don't want.
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prakel
Guard Bee


Joined: 13 Nov 2012
Posts: 65
Location: Dorset, UK

PostPosted: Sun Nov 23, 2014 9:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In you position I'd look at it like this: will the sold hives be kept in the area where I wish to build a commercial bee business, if yes, then there's no way I'd consider the option; too many variables, the new owners deciding to manage the bees themselves or simply deciding to hire a different/cheaper hive manager. Then there's the issue of whether they may start to sell honey themselves at a later date.
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mrwaltner
House Bee


Joined: 15 Sep 2012
Posts: 15
Location: Mt Gambier, SA, Australia

PostPosted: Sun Nov 23, 2014 9:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the advice; you've basically summed up my own thoughts on it over the last couple of days, which is good confirmation. The hives are on a property that is part of my 'distributed apiary', so I'm definitely using the property and the area to build my business. I'm going to stick to building up my own hives and bees for now and avoid complications.
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ChrisM
House Bee


Joined: 20 May 2015
Posts: 13
Location: New Zealand, Tauranga, Papamoa

PostPosted: Wed May 20, 2015 6:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi, there are a number of beekeepers in NZ that offer hire a hive or host a hive or whatever and I'm thinking of doing it myself. It is aimed at urban backyards for people to have their own bees. It is not a way to get cheap honey. There are a variety of offerings all fairly localised within distance of the beekeeper. It reminds me of a lawnmowing round where someone goes around with a load of lawnmowers. The going rate from what I have seen on website is NZ $500 per annum and you either get half the honey or 10kg or something like that. I imagine if you have enough hives it could become a fair return for a fair amount of work. thoughts?
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