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Bee wrestling?

 
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anepictree
New Bee


Joined: 18 Jul 2014
Posts: 6
Location: Brittany, France

PostPosted: Fri Aug 15, 2014 10:35 pm    Post subject: Bee wrestling? Reply with quote

Hello all, I have been through topics and can't find this covered but maybe looking in wrong place? I have been watching the hive entrance of the Dadant hive in my garden over the last few (very rainy wet days) It would appear that there is always a bee forcing another out the hive to the ground and that the pair are wrestling; the struggle lasts some minutes then one flies back to the hive whilst the other is clutching onto a long blade of grass. These bees are always very very docile, but today I did have an excited fellow insistently settle on my arm, very loud, which has not happened before, i thought I was in for a sting but I walked off slowly and eventually he left me. Does anyone have any in information on this wrestling behaviour and what it may signify. Best wishes - Peter Caine
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rmcpb
Scout Bee


Joined: 17 Jul 2011
Posts: 447
Location: Blue Mountains, NSW, Australia

PostPosted: Fri Aug 15, 2014 11:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Are they throwing the drones out?
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anepictree
New Bee


Joined: 18 Jul 2014
Posts: 6
Location: Brittany, France

PostPosted: Sat Aug 16, 2014 7:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for this reply! having looked at several books it would appear that this must be drone illimination - In Storch's 'At the hive entrance' it says that drones that have been weakened by not being fed are pushed out by colonnies that do have a queen; at this time of year. So I am re-assured by your reply.
Thanks and best wishes. Peter
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Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1582
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Mon Aug 18, 2014 9:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi and welcome

You should notice that the bee that is being evicted, is much larger than the one kicking it out.... sometimes it takes 2 or 3 workers to remove a drone.
If you are seeing bees of the same size "wrestling", then this indicates that robbing is taking place and you need to reduce the entrance, so your bees can defend it better. At this time of year drone eviction is usually well underway in most hives, but it is also a time when robbing is more likely to occur both by other honey bees and wasps, so keep a close eye on the entrance for the next few weeks to be sure that the wrestling continues to be natural drone eviction and not something more sinister.

Quote:
but today I did have an excited fellow insistently settle on my arm, very loud, which has not happened before, i thought I was in for a sting but I walked off slowly


I appreciate that you are in France and therefore English may not be your first language, but "fellow" is a term used for a male, and male bees (drones) cannot sting, so if you were aware it was a real "fellow" on your arm, then there was no cause for concern re stinging. For information they Have bigger eyes and hairy bums and are more clumsy and also much more noisy than female (worker) bees.

Best wishes

Barbara
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anepictree
New Bee


Joined: 18 Jul 2014
Posts: 6
Location: Brittany, France

PostPosted: Mon Aug 18, 2014 7:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dear Barbara, thanks so much for your reply, full of useful information. I am in France but English is my mother tongue so no excuse for my language other than being a beeginner! I used the word fellow perjoratively like 'little chap' but on the other hand I had not bothered to look as to tell the truth the wrestling had me worried and was on my mind.

I do believe that the bees were the same size so will go and watch again cosely and of course follow your advice.

Once again many thanks for your reply, it is so re-assuring for beginners like me hosting hives, to have experts to give council. Regards - Peter
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ingo50
Scout Bee


Joined: 30 May 2014
Posts: 311
Location: Newport, Gwent, Wales, UK

PostPosted: Mon Aug 18, 2014 7:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dear Barbara.
Did not know that drones are noisier than worker bees, thanks for info,pity this doesn't apply to the human species Very Happy
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Paul Reyes
Nurse Bee


Joined: 14 Aug 2014
Posts: 26
Location: Scottsdale, AZ, USA

PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2014 7:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It does happen when the drone is hungry, but usually doesn't last that long.
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