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new castle indiana, new urban TBH beekeeper

 
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muddymom
Guard Bee


Joined: 07 Nov 2012
Posts: 52
Location: Indiana, USA

PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2012 5:23 pm    Post subject: new castle indiana, new urban TBH beekeeper Reply with quote

Smile Hi to all. I am a newbee to beekeeping,sited on 1/4 acre in the city limits of this city.
going to do TBH in spite of most of the apiaries in the are using Langestrom hives. There is one apiary using top bar but he is not organicly inclined.
My biggest challanges are figuring out the best plants to put in for my bees in terms of high nectar amounts and pollen, and finding an organic top bar using apiary to order bees from.
If anone out there has suggestions on plants or apiaries I would sure be gateful.
I live in a zone 5a (-10 low occasionally) area and am designing my gardens for bees,butterflys and hummingbirds. Laughing
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major1896
Guard Bee


Joined: 21 Dec 2011
Posts: 92
Location: Great Falls, Mt

PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2012 9:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My bees like clover and. Lavender. Lots of lavender. But they will travel far for there needs anyway.

You can't keep them corralled anyway

Howard
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HMcEwen
Guard Bee


Joined: 03 Jun 2011
Posts: 78
Location: Bellevue, Kentucky

PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2012 1:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I wouldn't be too concerned with it. I live on the Ohio River in a very urban setting. My lot (with house) is 100 feet deep by 30 feet wide. I planted stuff but the bees almost seem to actively avoid my yard. They'll find what they want where they want.

However, this year I started replacing my grass with white clover. When the clover bloomed we did see the occasional bee on it.
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Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1573
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2012 2:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is a lovely idea to plant your garden for bees and other insects but along with many other beekeepers, I find my bees go further afield. There have been numerous lists of plants that are favoured by bees posted on this site and others. Obviously these will be dependent on your local climate, so I can't really recommend anything personally.
It can certainly be useful to have bee friendly plants to entice bees from elsewhere to forage in your garden in the hope that you can lure a swarm to come and move into your hive/bait box and it's also important to cater for bumblebees and other beneficial insects. Just don't be too offended if your bees go next door once they have move in. They can be contrary little creatures sometimes! Confused

Regards

Barbara
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IanT
Guard Bee


Joined: 21 Feb 2014
Posts: 51
Location: Lafayette, Indiana

PostPosted: Sat Feb 22, 2014 2:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My bees are rarely in my my yard. The one exception I think is on oregano blossoms. I wish they did not leave my yard...it would be easier for me to supply them with a good clean water source.

However, planting bee friendly plants is still a great idea and on a 1/4 acre lot you may get more visiting than on my small postage stamp yard. Certainly all the other bees around you will appreciate it.
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Garret
Golden Bee


Joined: 04 Apr 2009
Posts: 1681
Location: Canada, BC, Delta

PostPosted: Sat Feb 22, 2014 5:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The early producing plants would be a good choice for the cooler weather when they are not so inclined to fly to far from home. If you have room and a spot, some of the willows produce large amounts of pollen and are an excellent source of protein. One maple tree will produce an amazing amount of nectar and pollen.

It wouldn't hurt to walk the local neighborhood first to see if these are already close by. If they are planting things that will bloom before, between or just after may be something to consider.
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compac
New Bee


Joined: 22 Dec 2014
Posts: 1
Location: Gibraltar

PostPosted: Mon Dec 22, 2014 8:56 am    Post subject: Re: A story: The Frog Reply with quote

Thanks for the encouragement. Ill keep trying. The ones I have found seem to be ignorant about them or have
tried them once and decided they didn't like them.
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