Please support Friends of the Bees to keep this forum free to use.

Natural Beekeeping International Forum
low-cost, low-impact, balanced beekeeping for everyone

 Forum FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileYour Profile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Please Read The Rules before posting.



(country selected automatically - UK/USA/CA/AU)
Mould in hive and runny honey

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> Beginners start here
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
anth1979
New Bee


Joined: 06 Apr 2015
Posts: 5
Location: Rochdale

PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2015 4:15 pm    Post subject: Mould in hive and runny honey Reply with quote

Hi all.

Due to a recent house move I have not inspected my hive since June 2014.
Given today's warm weather and good fly day I decided to have a quick look in to see how they are.

Long story short

The observation window has failed, the elements have got in and caused blackspot and blue green mould to grow on the majority of the combs of varying severity.

The hive itself appears well populated otherwise.

I have ordered a new hive to transfer the combs in order to undertake repairs... but ....do I need to undertake any intervention for the interim ?


Separate Issue

Honey that leaked out of the combs due to the usual damage sustained appeared exceptionally watery. Is this due to the elemental exposure?

Any advice or help would be greatly appreciated.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1567
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2015 7:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi and welcome.

Is this a horizontal top bar hive? How has the weather managed to get in through the window.... I would assume the window is on the sloping side with a cover over it and the roof should have enough overhang to prevent water touching the cover unless there has been driving rain. Perhaps you could just put architrave round the edge of the window cover to prevent the wet getting in. Is the mould just tainting the surface of the comb or is it thick and furry right into the cells?

Can you take some photos so that we can see where the problem might lie.
Bees are able to clean up mould from comb if it not too extensive. Once the temperature warms up and the bees are more active on the comb, the air flow will improve and the mould problem should subside.

The runny "honey" you describe could be new nectar that they have just been bringing in. How did the comb get damaged to release it. Was there some comb attachment that you didn't noticeI hope you don't have an open mesh floor as spillage could spark robbing.

It's so difficult to make a judgement call on something like this without seeing it. If the bees have survived this far then things can't be too bad. Was there much capped honey or was it all open, as that will create a lot of moisture?

Regards

Barbara
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
anth1979
New Bee


Joined: 06 Apr 2015
Posts: 5
Location: Rochdale

PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2015 8:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Barbara

Yeah its a TBH.

It seems that the perspex window has loosened where the glue would have been and created about a 1cm gap between the hive frame and perspex.
The observation window is covered with a removable wooden slat albeit loosely

The mould is like the mould you get with condensation e.g like around a window frame.

There were cells thick with a blue fury mould with some mummified mouldy bees stuck to it. reminded me of bread or cheese mould.

I only inspected the back 14 bars as I lost nerve and did not want to risk further loosening the perspex until I had a replacement to transfer them to should the worst happen.

The back 14 bars were filled with capped and uncapped honey with some bridge comb and adhesions to the side of the hive wall. It was while I was working theses loose that they were damaged and the honey was running out. it was very runny about the consistency of sugar syrup. Its an open mesh floor with a wooden bottom that can be raised to close it in winter.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Adam Rose
Silver Bee


Joined: 09 Oct 2011
Posts: 582
Location: Manchester, UK

PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2015 11:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

anth1979 wrote:

It seems that the perspex window has loosened where the glue would have been and created about a 1cm gap between the hive frame and perspex.
The observation window is covered with a removable wooden slat albeit loosely


Barbara is right to ask for pictures so we have a better idea of what is going on, but it's quite easy to make repairs from the outside.

You just want to make sure that there is a well insultated enclosed cavity that the bees are living in. This doesn't necessarily mean doing anything much to the broken perspex. When I had the observation window cover stolen and the perspex window slightly damaged I improvised with insulation like this: http://www.diy.com/departments/bq-loft-insulation-l75m-w600mm/182139_BQ.prd and a couple of layers of plywood. What started off as improvisation has now become semi permanent ! Maybe you could use something like that, and maybe also some tape to temporarily block any gaps between the cover and the hive.

If you're not going to move the bees soon, then I think you should do whatever you can from the outside to make this kind of well insulated, windproof cavity.

Adam.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
csturgess
House Bee


Joined: 30 Jun 2014
Posts: 11
Location: somerset, uk

PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 5:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

May I add a question? I too had a mould like substance (though it wasn't fuzzy) in my hive when we looked in this spring but it wasn't on the comb, it was on the side walls.

My bees have propolised the entire mesh floor and it also looked like they were putting some propolis around the one opening we left so they were reducing any ventilation. They have since chewed this away.

The hive was well insulated (building insulation attached to the roof and horse hair in a mesh bag on the windward side in the empty space past the follower board.

The bees look fine but I am a bit worried about the discolouration, which is only where the bees lived.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
anth1979
New Bee


Joined: 06 Apr 2015
Posts: 5
Location: Rochdale

PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 8:20 pm    Post subject: Update Reply with quote

Hi all

Just an update.

Update is nature knows best. Once we got the warmer weather the bees sealed up the plastic screen with propolis which i reinforced from the outside with window sealant.

And no trace of the mould. once the condensation was under control the honey has returned to a thicker consistency.

Cheers for the help.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> Beginners start here All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

SPECIAL OFFER FOR UK FORUM MEMBERS - Buy your protective clothing here and get a special 15% discount! (use the code BAREFOOTBEEKEEPER at checkout and be sure to 'update basket')



Are the big energy companies bleeding you dry?


Is way too much of your hard-earned family income going up in smoke?

Are you worried about what could happen if the ageing grid system fails?

You need to watch this short video NOW to find out how YOU can cut your energy bills TO THE BONE within 30 days!

WATCH THE VIDEO NOW



(country selected automatically - UK/USA/CA/AU)

Conserving wild bees

Research suggests that bumble bee boxes have a very low success rate in actually attracting bees into them. We find that if you create an environment where first of all you can attract mice inside, such as a pile of stones, a drystone wall, paving slabs with intentionally made cavities underneath, this will increase the success rate.

Most bumble bee species need a dry space about the size a football, with a narrow entrance tunnel approximately 2cm in diameter and 20 cm long. Most species nest underground along the base of a linear feature such as a hedge or wall. Sites need to be sheltered and out of direct sunlight.

There is a spectacular display of wild bee hotels here

More about bumblebees and solitary bees here

Information about the Tree Bumblebee (Bombus hypnorum)

Barefoot Beekeeper Podcast



Now available from Lulu.com


Now available from Lulu.com


Now available from Lulu.com


4th Edition paperback now available from Lulu.com

See beekeeping books for details and links to ebook versions.
site map
php. BB © 2001, 2005 php. BB Group

View topic - Mould in hive and runny honey - Natural Beekeeping Network Forum