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Bees and horses

 
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johnshadows
House Bee


Joined: 01 Nov 2014
Posts: 14
Location: Belgium

PostPosted: Sat Nov 01, 2014 5:30 pm    Post subject: Bees and horses Reply with quote

I really want to start with beekeeping, the natural way.
Now I live in a place where we live close to our neighbours.
The beehive will be placed 100 meters from our door, and about 120 meters from our neighbours door.
That's ok.
But my neighbour keeps horses in a pasture next the hive.
What do you think about this combination.
Anybody experienced with this?
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Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1564
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Sun Nov 02, 2014 12:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have heard it said that bees and horses are not a good mix.
I have both but they are 200-300 metres from each other.

I keep my hives right outside my back door.... 6 colonies within 5 metres of the door and would not want to keep them anywhere else because I can monitor them every day. I highly recommend keeping them near the house, so that you can keep a check of what's going on all the time. Everyone uses my back door and it's not a problem.
I regularly stand next to the hives watching the bees come and go in "smelly" clothes that I have been wearing to groom and muck out and that certainly doesn't bother them. The bees do visit the stable yard and forage on the manure heap for whatever minerals or microbes they need and don't bother the horses, but I have not kept a hive in close proximity to the horses. I think a problem could arise if a horse gets accidentally stung and bolts, which carries a risk of the horse and or a person getting injured. This could happen and in fact is much more likely with a wasp or biting fly. The difficulty would be that if you had a hive nearby, they are likely to point the finger at you, but they can of course not prove it was one of your bees. It's really a question of doing as much as you can to mitigate that. Erect a screen to ensure the bees fly up and over horse head height when they leave the hive and face the hive away from the field. Maybe move it nearer to your house. If you are not comfortable living next to them, why should your neighbours be happy with you putting them next to their horse?

I personally would not have a problem if my neighbour at the stable yard put a hive in his allotment garden.... I have in fact tried to encourage him, but he is concerned about them causing a nuisance to other neighbours at swarming time. Of course I am experienced enough to know it is not a problem.....but public perception of bees is not always rational.

I think the best thing to do is to talk to your neighbour about it and have options available to move it nearer the house or screen it from the field, so they know that you are giving them consideration. Make it clear that you INTEND to keep bees(assuming there are no local restrictions) but want to be sympathetic to any concerns they may have.

Best wishes

Barbara
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johnshadows
House Bee


Joined: 01 Nov 2014
Posts: 14
Location: Belgium

PostPosted: Sun Nov 02, 2014 1:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey Barbara, thank you for your answer.
You are allowed to have your hive near the backdoor...
We are not, by the law.
In my country the law says I have to stay away 20 meters from my neighbours door.
Having a chat with my neighbour will not help.
I bought the house and land 20 years ago.
At that time he stated that the land was his and that he wanted to place horses on it.
I'm very sorry sir, I bought this land with the house to have a garden.
The rest is history. He doesn't talk to me.
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Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1564
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Sun Nov 02, 2014 6:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry to hear you have a bad relationship with your neighbour. That makes life so much less pleasant.

No regulations here about where I can or cannot keep them thankfully.... one of our other members, Zaunreiter, has (or had) a couple of Warre hives actually inside the house, in the attic and was working on the concept of having a large observation hive in the living room. Having no TV does funny things to people Wink

I would probably still take steps to reduce the likelihood of problems, but if there is no law to prevent you siting it next to the paddock, then there is not a lot he can do and as I said, as a horse owner myself, I would have no problem with my neighbour keeping bees next to my stables and land and in fact I was keen to encourage him.

Regards

Barbara
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andy pearce
Silver Bee


Joined: 30 Aug 2009
Posts: 663
Location: UK, East Sussex, Brighton

PostPosted: Sun Nov 02, 2014 7:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When I moved into our current house the garden was derelict and neck high in brambles. The south facing hedge was overgrown and it was agreed with the landlords (a well known UK charity) that I would clear the garden for vegetables and bees. The bees were to be placed facing south by the felled hedge line which I rabbit fenced and replanted. The paddock over the fence was also unused with plans to have an orchard on it.

Nothing happened about the orchard (I offered to plant it!)and eventually the tenancy in the old farm next door changed and a pony arrived in the field. The field had been let to the new tenants.

I did warn the new people that the field was on my bees flight path and it was best to stay away from the hedge.

I was very worried about the bees and the pony having heard that bees like horse sweat but the pony soon learned when to graze that area and when to stay away. It did gallop about a lot in the summer but I realised it was getting rid of flies not bees. It was not bothered and neither were the bees.

That is my experience.
A
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R Payne
Foraging Bee


Joined: 11 Apr 2011
Posts: 123
Location: USA, Kansas, Wichita

PostPosted: Sun Nov 02, 2014 11:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just to put it out there

I work in a zoo. There is a "farms" area in this zoo with horses, cattle etc. This last spring a bee exhibit was added in the barn with the horses and cattle, the entrance of the hive points outside right in the path the livestock uses to go to the pasture. The hive threw 2 swarms this summer. So far no problems.

ron
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Che Guebuddha
Golden Bee


Joined: 31 Jan 2012
Posts: 1549
Location: Hårlev, Stevns Kommune, Denmark

PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2014 8:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Last year i had 6 hives 5 meters from the fence where neighbours horses are and no issues ever. I could see horses grazing on their flying path still no issues.

This year we moved to a new farm and again my new neighbor has 7 horses Smile no issues. This time they are 100 meters away.

If the bees are calm there will be no problems.
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johnshadows
House Bee


Joined: 01 Nov 2014
Posts: 14
Location: Belgium

PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2014 8:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm very glad to read this.
The only problem will be my neighbour himself, not the horses. Wink
He will certainly try something out... We'll see.
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mocko
Nurse Bee


Joined: 14 Aug 2011
Posts: 45
Location: UK, Wales, Swansea

PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2014 9:23 pm    Post subject: Bees and horses Reply with quote

About five years ago I had a frightening experience with a horse on my smallholding, the fields are seperated by stone rubble banks, in which unknown to me a feral bee colony had taken up residence, this was before I kept bees myself. And at the time a friends horse was grazing the field when the bees attacked it, the horse went berserk and i was lucky enough to get out of the field alive. I know the bees were only defending themselves but it could have had a trajic outcome, What im trying to say is if the horse has no access to the hives it should be okay, as my smallholding is surrounded by grazing land and i have had no problems, although now i have planted hedges all around to be on the safe side. Paul
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johnshadows
House Bee


Joined: 01 Nov 2014
Posts: 14
Location: Belgium

PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 2014 6:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hedges around the hive...
A good tip mocko. Idea
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NewForester
Nurse Bee


Joined: 23 Jul 2010
Posts: 26
Location: New Forest, Hampshire, UK

PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 2014 9:29 pm    Post subject: Re: Bees and horses Reply with quote

I also had horses in the neighbouring field and never a problem with the horses.

BUT, hives can be a red rag to the horses's owners!! About 3 years ago there was an article in Horse and Hound where bees had supposedly killed horses. Reading the article it becomes clear that the hives and the horses were in the same field and that the horses died running into boggy ground (perhaps triggered by scratching their bums on the hive!). This wasn't helped by a BBKA spokesperson saying that horses and bees don't get on!

After this episode and on finding a swarm on out boundry, my neighbour called the Environmental Health. She also had a feral hive in a hollow tree on her land sealed up.

So, I suggest trying to make your hives as inconspicuous as you can in order not to draw attention from your neighbours!
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johnshadows
House Bee


Joined: 01 Nov 2014
Posts: 14
Location: Belgium

PostPosted: Wed Nov 05, 2014 6:17 pm    Post subject: Re: Bees and horses Reply with quote

NewForester wrote:
So, I suggest trying to make your hives as inconspicuous as you can in order not to draw attention from your neighbours!




That's a good one. really.
This year I was building foundations for a glasshouse.
5 minutes later he placed a ladder against the fence to see what we were doing...
But I like your suggestion.
It's so crazy it just might work! Wink
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meant2bee
Nurse Bee


Joined: 28 Aug 2014
Posts: 27
Location: Hawai'i, Kaua'i, Lawai

PostPosted: Thu Nov 06, 2014 7:18 am    Post subject: horses and bees Reply with quote

My hives are both within 3 meters of the neighbor's pasture - the bees and the horses seem to get along fine so far; I think my girls get more use out of the pasture than the horses do, as it is poorly managed and dominated by some weedy plant that the horses don't eat but the bees love!
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Paul Reyes
Nurse Bee


Joined: 14 Aug 2014
Posts: 26
Location: Scottsdale, AZ, USA

PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2014 6:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I good solution to this situation is to plant some wind breaker trees so that bees can't go over to the other side or plant hedge around.
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johnshadows
House Bee


Joined: 01 Nov 2014
Posts: 14
Location: Belgium

PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2014 7:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Paul Reyes wrote:
I good solution to this situation is to plant some wind breaker trees so that bees can't go over to the other side or plant hedge around.


He did poison my trees in the past ( lime tree, weeping willows, walnut, chestnut, and even a rambler rose, all poisoned and dead).
He doesn't like trees.
Trees have leaves... and then there's wind...
I tell him to go and live in a city.
He doesn't like my tone. Laughing
I haven't asked him if he likes bees. Shocked
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meant2bee
Nurse Bee


Joined: 28 Aug 2014
Posts: 27
Location: Hawai'i, Kaua'i, Lawai

PostPosted: Fri Dec 12, 2014 6:01 am    Post subject: ...i hate tree-haters too. Reply with quote

Here as well, we have many who don't like trees because they are "messy".
Few realize, how vital the trees are in feeding the web of life that makes everything that we are possible.
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Che Guebuddha
Golden Bee


Joined: 31 Jan 2012
Posts: 1549
Location: Hårlev, Stevns Kommune, Denmark

PostPosted: Fri Dec 12, 2014 8:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
we have many who don't like trees because they are "messy".


I had one neighbor complaining about her apple trees producing too many apple fruits that year because my bees pollinated it well. You see she is an older lady but she doesnt eat anything which doesn't come from the shop so she doesnt eat her own (organic) apples. For her its too much work to remove them from her lovely cut lawn. There are so many around here who dont collect their own apples and instead just leave them rotting or collect them and throw them away (and likely buy new ones in the shop). How can such people respect the chain of Life. They respect the chain of super markets instead.

When I hear "new-age" folk saying how all humanity is shifting in consciousness I tell them to actually open their eyes and look around and to go into a super market and look for 15 minutes what kind of milk or eggs or apples people mostly choose to buy Wink its not organic thats for sure even though Denmark is the No.1 country in buying organic (maybe in cities but country side folk still believes in conventional food, they like their money more than nature).
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johnshadows
House Bee


Joined: 01 Nov 2014
Posts: 14
Location: Belgium

PostPosted: Fri Dec 12, 2014 11:42 am    Post subject: Re: ...i hate tree-haters too. Reply with quote

meant2bee wrote:
Few realize, how vital the trees are in feeding the web of life that makes everything that we are possible.


I agree!
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csturgess
House Bee


Joined: 30 Jun 2014
Posts: 11
Location: somerset, uk

PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 5:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Have only just seen this post. I have my pony and my hive in the same field and just use fencing stakes and tape around the hive to keep him about a meter away from the hive. In the winter I removed the tape so he could get at the grass closer to the hive. To date there have been no issues.
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cjachens
New Bee


Joined: 28 Mar 2013
Posts: 3
Location: Northern California, USA

PostPosted: Fri May 01, 2015 3:35 am    Post subject: Horse in the TBH Reply with quote

This spring during a good flow I put a horse in a small pasture with two top bar hives. I strapped the top to the hive so the horse could not knock it off. The horse ate down all the grass in about 10 days. No problems at all. The grass next to the hive entrances was a little longer but still grazed.
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