Please support Friends of the Bees to keep this forum free to use.

Natural Beekeeping International Forum
low-cost, low-impact, balanced beekeeping for everyone

 Forum FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileYour Profile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Please Read The Rules before posting.



(country selected automatically - UK/USA/CA/AU)
Need to induce absconding

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> URGENT Help needed now!
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
CharlieBnoobee
Guard Bee


Joined: 11 Feb 2012
Posts: 97
Location: Virginia,USA; S. Appalachians;USDA zn. 6a

PostPosted: Thu May 14, 2015 2:34 am    Post subject: Need to induce absconding Reply with quote

A house painter contacted me last Friday (the 8th) re a swarm that had just moved into the top of a porch column of a house he was working on. The house is not currently occupied. Unfortunately, the entrance hole is located where the porch roof corner rests on the column and in such a way that setting a trap-out cone and box is impossible. Within a few hours I'd cobbled together a previously occupied 5-frame nuc deep body plus medium super; no frames, but three starter strips attached to the roof underside. The box volume comes to almost exactly 40 liters and the entrance hole (at the bottom) about 15 sq. cm. I secured it in a nearby bush/tree about 5 ft. from the column and about 6 ft. off the ground in near total shade. Put two drops of lemon grass oil on a bit of paper towel inside. I was hoping that the colony might be persuaded to remove to the nice cavity I'd fixed for them. (Convenient to shopping, good school district, quiet neighborhood, close by their present location, etc., etc., etc.)
Evidently they haven't read the extensive research carried out by Seeley and and others indicating the Vast Superiority of what I'm offering them over that tacky porch structure they're uncomfortably occupying now.
Anyone have any thoughts on how they might be encouraged to move If they haven't already gotten brood going?

Thanks
Charlie


Last edited by CharlieBnoobee on Tue May 19, 2015 11:18 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1574
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Thu May 14, 2015 12:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My two suggestions would be smoke and drumming.

Repeated rhythmical and quite sustained beating against the column below them should drive them up and out if the entrance is above. Usually you need a box above to drive them into Perhaps if you get a cardboard box, paint the inside with beeswax.... I do this with my cardboard swarm boxes. Fix a piece of old comb inside.... you can even fit a top bar inside the box by cutting small holes in the sides and feeding the ends through them. Attach some old comb to the top bar. Cut the side off the box, so that it fits right next to the hive entrance.... you could also paint clove oil around the other sides of the column to channel them towards the box.... they hate clove oil and will avoid it at all costs. You could just wedge the box up with a pole rather than try to fix it. It might be best to wrap your "beater" with cloth to stop it damaging the column and then set yourself for a good drumming session. It may take 15-20 mins to start seeing progress, so don't give up too soon, but once they start marching you should see things progress quite quickly. There is a video somewhere showing Turkish (I think) beekeepers doing this to eatablished colonies in their bark hives, but the porch column should work the same. I've used it for getting swarms out of dense hedges by bashing the trunk with a stick.

Alternatively, drill a hole below the colony and pump smoke into it for all you are worth!

Hope that gives you some ideas.

Good luck

Barbara
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
ingo50
Scout Bee


Joined: 30 May 2014
Posts: 311
Location: Newport, Gwent, Wales, UK

PostPosted: Thu May 14, 2015 4:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting about clove oil Barbara. Has this been used to stop swarming bees occupying the same inconvenient site? I was think of my experience on Monday with the swarm in my neighbours Blackthorn tree? Are there any other methods you know of please?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1574
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2015 8:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Ingo

I haven't used clove oil in that context.

I bought it to rub on my hands when I first started doing inspections without gloves many years ago. I now realise that it is not helpful to the bees to have such a strong smell in the midst of their home, especially one they dislike.
It came in handy last year though when I successfully used it whilst doing a trap out to prevent the bees tracking along a facia away from the cone to find a new route into their nest rather than adopt the bait hive I had put up. Just dapping it on the brick work and woodwork stopped them in their tracks and turned them back.

I guess it is worth a try on the thorn tree..... maybe mixing it with warm water in a hand sprayer, giving it a good shake and spraying it as an emulsion. Swarms do have a tendency to use the same resting points after initial exodus from the hive because they smell the previous queen's pheromone, so the clove oil should mask that. It might be helpful to give them a more attractive option too by creating a Russian scion and hanging it in a more convenient location to you.
Best of luck with that.


Any success with the bees in the porch column Charlie?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
ingo50
Scout Bee


Joined: 30 May 2014
Posts: 311
Location: Newport, Gwent, Wales, UK

PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2015 8:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the good advice again Barbara. I will give it a try if another swarm goes to the neighbour's tree. Will try to put up a Russian scion as described elsewhere on this forum.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> URGENT Help needed now! All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

SPECIAL OFFER FOR UK FORUM MEMBERS - Buy your protective clothing here and get a special 15% discount! (use the code BAREFOOTBEEKEEPER at checkout and be sure to 'update basket')



Are the big energy companies bleeding you dry?


Is way too much of your hard-earned family income going up in smoke?

Are you worried about what could happen if the ageing grid system fails?

You need to watch this short video NOW to find out how YOU can cut your energy bills TO THE BONE within 30 days!

WATCH THE VIDEO NOW



(country selected automatically - UK/USA/CA/AU)

Conserving wild bees

Research suggests that bumble bee boxes have a very low success rate in actually attracting bees into them. We find that if you create an environment where first of all you can attract mice inside, such as a pile of stones, a drystone wall, paving slabs with intentionally made cavities underneath, this will increase the success rate.

Most bumble bee species need a dry space about the size a football, with a narrow entrance tunnel approximately 2cm in diameter and 20 cm long. Most species nest underground along the base of a linear feature such as a hedge or wall. Sites need to be sheltered and out of direct sunlight.

There is a spectacular display of wild bee hotels here

More about bumblebees and solitary bees here

Information about the Tree Bumblebee (Bombus hypnorum)

Barefoot Beekeeper Podcast



Now available from Lulu.com


Now available from Lulu.com


Now available from Lulu.com


4th Edition paperback now available from Lulu.com

See beekeeping books for details and links to ebook versions.
site map
php. BB © 2001, 2005 php. BB Group

View topic - Need to induce absconding - Natural Beekeeping Network Forum