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(Video): Top Bar Hive Removal From Under Mobile Home in FL

 
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Patrick Thomas
Foraging Bee


Joined: 29 May 2012
Posts: 186
Location: Florida, USA

PostPosted: Mon Sep 21, 2015 11:57 pm    Post subject: (Video): Top Bar Hive Removal From Under Mobile Home in FL Reply with quote

.

Ok, so I'm finally done editing and uploading this video to YouTube.

Yes, the video is 30-minutes long. However, I had requests from some to add more cutting of comb, etc.

Keep in mind also that I keep the action moving. If I start vacuuming, it's only going to be for a few seconds in the video. Nobody wants to listen to a vacuum cleaner for 10 minutes. I realize my voice may not be much better than a vacuum, but hey, what can I do about that?

Enjoy the video. It was tough to edit all the footage down to 30-minutes...lol.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lK6BVybHzm0


,
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Patrick Thomas
Foraging Bee


Joined: 29 May 2012
Posts: 186
Location: Florida, USA

PostPosted: Thu Sep 24, 2015 2:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

.

No comments?

No questions?

There aren't a whole heck of a lot of people doing top bar removals on this scale.

Why the silence? Lol.

.
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Garret
Golden Bee


Joined: 04 Apr 2009
Posts: 1681
Location: Canada, BC, Delta

PostPosted: Sun Sep 27, 2015 4:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice job! Showing the brood being removed and placed onto the bars would have been very helpful. I've done many cut outs over the years but have never recorded any. Great to have this to view.
When doing my cut outs I'm mostly interested to get about 4 good size combs of brood and at least 1 pollen comb into the hive with all the bees. The honey can be fed back over time or harvest. Left over pieces of brood can be propped up on the hive floor to emerge or disposed of. With that many bees it doesn't take long for them to re establish their nest.
Nice job though!
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Patrick Thomas
Foraging Bee


Joined: 29 May 2012
Posts: 186
Location: Florida, USA

PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2015 8:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Garret wrote:
Nice job! Showing the brood being removed and placed onto the bars would have been very helpful. I've done many cut outs over the years but have never recorded any. Great to have this to view.
When doing my cut outs I'm mostly interested to get about 4 good size combs of brood and at least 1 pollen comb into the hive with all the bees. The honey can be fed back over time or harvest. Left over pieces of brood can be propped up on the hive floor to emerge or disposed of. With that many bees it doesn't take long for them to re establish their nest.
Nice job though!



Garret, thanks so much for watching and all the positive comments.

You have the luxury of being able to prop-up comb on your hive floor where you live. In Florida, small hive beetles would waste no time infesting the comb on the floor.

My only challenge here in Florida is the small hive beetle. No varroa issues, no freezing, etc. It's all about the SHB.

Thanks again, Garret, for watching.

.
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lancashirebeekeeper
House Bee


Joined: 28 Sep 2015
Posts: 10
Location: preston, Lancashire, UK

PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2015 3:19 pm    Post subject: mobile home cut out Reply with quote

hi patrick

just watched your video
very informative, i really enjoyed it
i particularly like the way you use wire to hold the cut out to the top bar
ive never seen it done that way before but it beats the pants off elastic bands
thanks for sharing

Very Happy
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Smorning
Foraging Bee


Joined: 20 Aug 2013
Posts: 150
Location: Faversham Kent UK

PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2015 7:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just watched video what a task very interesting and extremely sticky !!! Amazed phone survived the drips. Well done in saving these bees hope they do well in their new home(s)
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Patrick Thomas
Foraging Bee


Joined: 29 May 2012
Posts: 186
Location: Florida, USA

PostPosted: Tue Oct 13, 2015 7:55 pm    Post subject: Re: mobile home cut out Reply with quote

Yes, it's a bit time consuming to fabricate those hardware cloth holders, but I'm getting faster. I'm also becoming more discriminating as to how much brood comb to keep. Keep in mind, we have a bad problem with small hive beetles here and too much brood comb in a cut-out can be a recipe for disaster.

And thanks so much for watching, commenting and enjoying. Smile

.
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Patrick Thomas
Foraging Bee


Joined: 29 May 2012
Posts: 186
Location: Florida, USA

PostPosted: Tue Oct 13, 2015 8:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As a matter of fact, BOTH hives are doing great in their new homes. The overflow hive has already raised a queen and she's probably laying about by now. I have already seen her, but she was very young.

By the the way, a video of a more recent cutout I will soon be editing shows a newly-mated queen in the hive just a day-or-so after I got them home. She was apparently a virgin when I found her during the cutout and placed her in a clip. And I found it odd during that cutout that they weren't crowding around the queen clip like they normally do. It's because she was a virgin and her pheromones weren't quite raging enough. But yes, she had part of a drone still stuck in her when I found her once home. She flew several times during the cutout.....once when I was trying to film her being caught and once when I released her into the hive. Both times she came back........as she SHOULD.

But yes, the honey dripping during the video you speak of was amazing in that it didn't block-out the lense.

Thanks so much for watching and commenting. Smile

Patrick
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Smorning
Foraging Bee


Joined: 20 Aug 2013
Posts: 150
Location: Faversham Kent UK

PostPosted: Sun Oct 18, 2015 5:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great videos thanks for posting
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