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Fallen comb

 
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Cosmicwillow
Guard Bee


Joined: 07 Oct 2015
Posts: 82
Location: U.K. Notts/Lincs/Yorks border

PostPosted: Tue Oct 13, 2015 3:08 pm    Post subject: Fallen comb Reply with quote

In the process of putting in spaces part of a comb with just honey in has split off and is now on mesh floor ( horz TBhive), not any bigger than palm of hand, seems a little fiddly to retrieve. Leave it or attempt, (and maybe create more problems) to rectify it somehow?
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Adam Rose
Silver Bee


Joined: 09 Oct 2011
Posts: 586
Location: Manchester, UK

PostPosted: Tue Oct 13, 2015 5:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would leave it. There's no danger of robbing now the weather has turned cold. The bees will probably sort it out. If they don't, just scoop it up and eat the honey in the spring and straighten or simply remove any curved comb then.

I once had a major disaster - two or three combs collapsing, folded on top of each other. I just shut the hive and came back in the spring. In my first inspection, I scooped the collapsed comb out with a desert spoon ! It was an unusual way of doing a spring harvest but perfectly effective.
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Cosmicwillow
Guard Bee


Joined: 07 Oct 2015
Posts: 82
Location: U.K. Notts/Lincs/Yorks border

PostPosted: Tue Oct 13, 2015 9:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for that, thought I'd leave things to the bees. I expect they may clean up the honey and repack it.
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colobeekeep
Scout Bee


Joined: 27 Aug 2010
Posts: 286
Location: USA, Colorado, Denver

PostPosted: Sun Oct 18, 2015 5:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had the same thing happen in my Warré hive. They will most likely clean out the honey, but they will also start attaching the comb to the floor with brace comb. If it is close to other combs hanging from top bars, they will connect the hanging combs to the comb on the floor.
If you wait to let them clean it out, don't wait much longer than that to get the comb off of the floor.
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Garret
Golden Bee


Joined: 04 Apr 2009
Posts: 1681
Location: Canada, BC, Delta

PostPosted: Mon Oct 19, 2015 3:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would have removed the fallen comb right away for the reason colobeekeep brings up. I'm curious as to the thought of putting spacers in at this time of year? Spring build up would be a more appropriate time to make adjustments and even then it would make more sense to move imperfect combs further to the back of the hive and uncap the honey without spacers. Once the honey has been moved out of these combs its easy to adjust the combs into better positions to be refill during the flow. If need be use spacers then.
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Cosmicwillow
Guard Bee


Joined: 07 Oct 2015
Posts: 82
Location: U.K. Notts/Lincs/Yorks border

PostPosted: Tue Oct 20, 2015 6:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks colobeekeep/garret, was putting spacer between two bars, on advice, as bees had extended combs and they had begun to join. The colony is quite small as acquired as swarm late in year, have been feeding hoping to give them supply for winter and they've gone crazy with storing activity. Not sure they will over winter but you can but try. New to this so any advice is accepted, thought about and acted upon if appropriate. Thanks
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David43
House Bee


Joined: 01 Nov 2015
Posts: 14
Location: USA

PostPosted: Sun Nov 01, 2015 12:55 am    Post subject: Re: Fallen comb Reply with quote

I would leave combs in hive.
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Cosmicwillow
Guard Bee


Joined: 07 Oct 2015
Posts: 82
Location: U.K. Notts/Lincs/Yorks border

PostPosted: Sun Nov 01, 2015 9:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quick last check other day, bees have built completely new comb even at this time of year. I am now leaving them undisturbed as they are bringing in loads of pollen in this very unseasonable weather for November. Hope they'll get through their ( and my ) first winter.
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Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1581
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Mon Nov 02, 2015 12:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes this glorious autumn weather is making up for the hard time they had through the summer.
Must confess I'm a little concerned at how much pollen is going in and worried that they are perhaps raising more brood than they need to at this time of year.... which may result in stores running short before Spring in the smaller colonies, although the smell of ivy honey on an afternoon in the garden is quite heady at the moment.
Going to have a peek into a hive or two myself today There are a couple of small ones I have concerns about stores wise still. Hoping I will be pleasantly surprised to find they have topped things up themselves.
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Cosmicwillow
Guard Bee


Joined: 07 Oct 2015
Posts: 82
Location: U.K. Notts/Lincs/Yorks border

PostPosted: Mon Nov 02, 2015 2:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for comments Barbara, didn't realise that up rate of pollen, and it certainly is, may mean brood increase. My two colonies are small as collected as swarms late summer, am I likely to have problems over wintering? Up to about a week ago have been feeding on syrup ( 2 to 1 mix) but read advice about liquid vis a vis evaporation/daytime temperature and have ceased the feeding using this method. Should I maybe attempt fondant feeding in case they have been stretching themselves by producing brood? Kinda wanted to let things take their course but find I've got more involved during my initial foray into the world of bee keeping.
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Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1581
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Mon Nov 02, 2015 4:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is our human nature to want interfere!
I can reassure you that if you had not fed your late swarms they would almost certainly not survive, so some interference is worthwhile but it's always difficult to know when you have over stepped the mark and I still make that mistake on occasion, so it is not for me to say what is the right or wrong thing to do. I would wait as regards the fondant and only offer it if they get low on stores in the winter, otherwise it will just attract moist air and go wet and mouldy. This foggy weather is making everything pretty damp!

The hives I looked into this afternoon were thankfully not producing excess brood for the time of year but just laying down a good store of pollen so I was probably worrying unnecessarily on that score. Unfortunately one was still very light on stores and I may combine it with another later in the week. One top bar nuc was extremely damp and mouldy at the back but the combs and bees were fine. They just have too much space at the back of the hive where moist air is condensing, so I need to create a follower board and insulate the space.

Otherwise all appears OK

Good luck to you and your bees for your first winter.

Regards

Barbara
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mefgbee
Guard Bee


Joined: 10 Jul 2014
Posts: 57
Location: UK, Cheltenham

PostPosted: Tue Nov 03, 2015 7:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've noticed tons of pollen going into one my hives too!

A couple of weeks ago I hung some fondant in netting (and also made a fondant frame; will post some pictures on the other feeding thread when I get a chance) and they seem to be working their way through it slowly.

One of mine has an observation window so it's easy to see how they're progressing. They are the stronger hive, and have reasonable stores (about 6 full bars, and a few half bars). They seem to have wound down for winter, and aren't as active as before. But the other is not so easy to gauge as there's no window. They've been incredibly busy the last month and are slowly taking fondant which is at the rear of their hive behind a follower.

I've avoided opening them up this last few weeks as I felt there wasn't much I could do no matter what I discovered, apart from keeping their feeding supply topped up (which I am already doing).

Maybe I should take a quick look if we get another warm afternoon, just to preempt any problems that may be looming during winter? The roof is insulated, but no insulation behind the rear follower.
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