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Sugar versus honey. Winner: honey

 
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Sat Jul 19, 2014 9:13 am    Post subject: Sugar versus honey. Winner: honey Reply with quote

Diet-dependent gene expression in honey bees: honey vs. sucrose or high fructose corn syrup

Beekeepers often feed high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) or sucrose after harvesting honey or during periods of nectar dearth. We report that, relative to honey, chronic feeding of either of these two alternative carbohydrate sources elicited hundreds of differences in gene expression in the fat body, a peripheral nutrient-sensing tissue analogous to vertebrate liver and adipose tissues. These expression differences included genes involved in protein metabolism and oxidation-reduction, including some involved in tyrosine and phenylalanine metabolism. Differences between HFCS and sucrose diets were much more subtle and included a few genes involved in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Our results suggest that bees receive nutritional components from honey that are not provided by alternative food sources widely used in apiculture.
http://www.nature.com/srep/2014/140717/srep05726/full/srep05726.html
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biobee
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 1055
Location: UK, England, S. Devon

PostPosted: Sat Jul 19, 2014 9:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting counterpoint to the recent publicity about the research that seemed to suggest that bees did better on sugar than honey.
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zaunreiter
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Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Sun Jul 20, 2014 4:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, there are some valid points. Sugar is better in the far North because they do not need to poop so much in cold long winter. Also it doesn't carry foulbrood or nosema, honey sometimes does. Especially if you feed honey from one colony to the other, this spreads disease. Sugar is feed to bees on a broad scale for more than 140 years. In the old books before that time you find supplememtal feeding with fruit mash in times of great nectar dearth.

Nevertheless the finding (we all knew it...) raises questions. It is another factor that weakens our bees.

But it is not the only one. I wintered bees on honey for ten years now, still I do not find superbees. There must be more to the story of the collapses. (We all know it...)
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ingo50
Scout Bee


Joined: 30 May 2014
Posts: 311
Location: Newport, Gwent, Wales, UK

PostPosted: Sun Jul 20, 2014 8:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for posting Bernhardt, an interesting study. I had to re-read it and am not able to comment on the statistics as not familiar with their methods used. I think this paragraph summed it up:

Gene Ontology enrichment analyses showed honey upregulates genes associated with processes such as “aromatic amino acid family metabolic process,” as well as “oxidation reduction.” Among the genes in these categories were orthologs for the Drosophila melanogaster genes pale and henna, which are related to phenylalanine and tyrosine metabolism. These amino acids have been linked to the production of neurotransmitters31, and in the case of pale to immune responses to infection32. Honey additionally upregulated the gene glutathione S transferase O3, whose activity is known to be induced by plant compounds and to have toxicological significance in the presence of pesticides33. HFCS and sucrose relative to honey resulted in the upregulation of different biological processes. Sucrose, for example, upregulated processes such as axonogenesis but it is unlikely that axonogenesis is upregulated in our fat body samples; rather this GO category reflects upregulation of signaling pathways that play different roles in different tissues. HFCS upregulated the transmembrane receptors domeless and tyramine receptor suggesting differences in JAK-STAT signaling and tyrosine signaling between HFCS and honey.

Pity they did not elaborate further on postulated or know effects of axiogenesis, neurotransmitter or immune at a molecular level and how it relates to pesticide use, but would be criticized if did so.As you have stated, this is another small scientific bit of proof to completing the puzzle, but will it be in time to halt the ecological catastrophe?
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2014 8:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In a German beekeeping dictionary dated 1805 syrup and malt syrup for feeding bees is described.

http://zs.thulb.uni-jena.de/receive/jportal_jparticle_00044359
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Balamut
House Bee


Joined: 04 Nov 2015
Posts: 14
Location: usa

PostPosted: Wed Nov 04, 2015 3:26 am    Post subject: Re: Sugar versus honey. Winner: honey Reply with quote

Natural raw honey is always much better than sugar syrup but it`s dangerous when there is no nectar flow because bees will start stealing and killing each other.
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