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Fondant

 
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Cosmicwillow
Guard Bee


Joined: 07 Oct 2015
Posts: 82
Location: U.K. Notts/Lincs/Yorks border

PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2015 1:45 pm    Post subject: Fondant Reply with quote

Have just attempted to produce a quantity of fondant. 4kilo to 1ltr water, boiled to 240, left for so long, it is now cooling at same time as being stirred. Think I've kept it at 240 for too long, it's almost the consistency of Kendal Mint Cake, that is, you need strong teeth to bite through it. Is it too much for the bees, can/should I re-melt it, add more water and not boil for so long too get a more 'spreadable' product?
or have I got the ratio wrong?
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jumbleoak
Scout Bee


Joined: 03 Aug 2010
Posts: 295
Location: UK, England, Kent

PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2015 6:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That is exactly how I think of the consistency that you get most of the time using this recipe. It has worked for me - or, rather the bees. The only thing you can do differently that I know of is to whisk, whisk, whisk rather than stir once it drops below 100c / 210 F.
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Cosmicwillow
Guard Bee


Joined: 07 Oct 2015
Posts: 82
Location: U.K. Notts/Lincs/Yorks border

PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2015 7:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes I did whisk and whisk, it looked good then we got sweet concrete. Have chopped it up in smoothymaker, added bit more water and managed an amount for the hive but will need to get jackhammer to what is left in pan. Might try again and take off heat as it hits 240. Anyone got any thoughts about what to add to keep it like putty. Seen YouTube of Phil Chandler spreading the stuff on empty comb, no chance with mine! How about a lump of it on the mesh at bottom of hive?
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jumbleoak
Scout Bee


Joined: 03 Aug 2010
Posts: 295
Location: UK, England, Kent

PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2015 7:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This recipe will not make plastic fondant.
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Cosmicwillow
Guard Bee


Joined: 07 Oct 2015
Posts: 82
Location: U.K. Notts/Lincs/Yorks border

PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2015 9:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So recipe is slightly wrong then, am I missing the ingredient ' glucose syrup', think maybe I am. What does anyone think about melting down marshmallows, organic ones possibly.
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trekmate
Golden Bee


Joined: 30 Nov 2009
Posts: 1125
Location: UK, North Yorkshire, Bentham

PostPosted: Sat Nov 21, 2015 7:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cosmicwillow wrote:
So recipe is slightly wrong then, am I missing the ingredient ' glucose syrup', think maybe I am. What does anyone think about melting down marshmallows, organic ones possibly.

I've never tried marshmallow (and after a quick search for recipes I wouldn't - eggs, gelatine), but glucose syrup makes all the difference - just one dessert spoon in 4:1 sugar:water. And yes, whisk as it cools.

I've never had a consistency where I could spread it into old comb, but can usually push a finger into it without much effort.
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David43
House Bee


Joined: 01 Nov 2015
Posts: 14
Location: USA

PostPosted: Thu Nov 26, 2015 10:17 pm    Post subject: Re: Fondant Reply with quote

The more you boil it the more toxic for bees it becomes.
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andy pearce
Silver Bee


Joined: 30 Aug 2009
Posts: 663
Location: UK, East Sussex, Brighton

PostPosted: Mon Nov 30, 2015 4:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have tried it and it worked but in the hive became a wet sludge dripping like lava down the combs in a wet and humid winter. I don’t like it but if I do have to feed sugar that is what I give them....bag of castor sugar held under water for five seconds then dried (on my radiator for a few days, it goes hard) and wrapped in cling film. poke a hole in and pop over the feeder hole on crown board or cloth (or the top bar with a hole and cork in it...). The hive humidity makes the surface sugar available while not turning it to dripping sugar.It works for me but I always make sure my hives have honey to go through...I do this if the bees are high up in the hive looking for food in late winter and I have misjudged their stores.

Glucose syrup is what you need as said above.
A
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