Please support Friends of the Bees to keep this forum free to use.

Natural Beekeeping International Forum
low-cost, low-impact, balanced beekeeping for everyone

 Forum FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileYour Profile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Please Read The Rules before posting.



(country selected automatically - UK/USA/CA/AU)
The Transfer to TBH gets off to a mixed start

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> Horizontal top bar hives
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
BSJ
Nurse Bee


Joined: 13 Apr 2015
Posts: 38
Location: Norfolk, UK

PostPosted: Sun Jun 19, 2016 11:24 am    Post subject: The Transfer to TBH gets off to a mixed start Reply with quote

Hello All,

OK, the queen is NOT dead, Long Live the Queen.
And I am seeing full pollen sacs and the Ladies are even building their own nice caternary wax which has brood throughout it and is far nicer than I ever realised natural comb would be.

The only trouble is, I didn't have quite enough top bars in there and kept putting off going in because the rain has been torrential this last week, and it turned out they had built their beautiful edifice hanging like a stalagtite from the gap through which they could reach the qe.

After panicking, I cut it off and took it away and tried using a hanger (which was a trick I saw somewhere, possibly here).

I don't know if it will work.

How do I put pictures in in here, btw? In the meantime, the pics are here: www.beeswaxlyrical.blogspot.com

Help!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
AndyC
Scout Bee


Joined: 04 Jul 2014
Posts: 288
Location: Uk/Horsham/RH13

PostPosted: Sun Jun 19, 2016 12:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Was looking good with the colony transfer.

Where is your QE in a TBH?

For poorly attached comb the most elegant solution appears to be a bit of chicken wire about six or eight inches wide (or more) by slightly less than the length of a topbar, either stapled in the middle along the bottom of a plain top bar for holding detached comb under a new bar, or over the top of the bar for repairs without removing the comb.

Cut it so it has ends sticking l out and fold it down over both sides of the comb and stick the pointy ends in to hold the comb in place.

Good for you mate, I haven't taken the plunge yet and have stuck with nationals but with some foundationless frames to see how it goes.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
BSJ
Nurse Bee


Joined: 13 Apr 2015
Posts: 38
Location: Norfolk, UK

PostPosted: Sun Jun 19, 2016 12:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

AndyC wrote:
Was looking good with the colony transfer.

Where is your QE in a TBH?

For poorly attached comb the most elegant solution appears to be a bit of chicken wire about six or eight inches wide (or more) by slightly less than the length of a topbar, either stapled in the middle along the bottom of a plain top bar for holding detached comb under a new bar, or over the top of the bar for repairs without removing the comb.

Cut it so it has ends sticking l out and fold it down over both sides of the comb and stick the pointy ends in to hold the comb in place.

Good for you mate, I haven't taken the plunge yet and have stuck with nationals but with some foundationless frames to see how it goes.


Great, Andy, thanks. That's way more elegant than my solution. Perhaps I ought to have asked first Wink

The QE is because I am still in a National brood box - with half already done national frames but trying to get them to go onto the top bars and produce Tbh-ready comb - then I will transfer them.

How are your foundationless frames going?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
AndyC
Scout Bee


Joined: 04 Jul 2014
Posts: 288
Location: Uk/Horsham/RH13

PostPosted: Sun Jun 19, 2016 12:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh right got you.

I had forgotten the frame converting, so your confining her to the top bar bit, got it.

On the frameless thing I only just last week pulled two frames of undrawn foundation and dropped in two with just 25mm of foundation at the top on the outside of the brood nest in a national.

The colony has only been in there since 5 June so a bit too early to disturb Them again I reckon.

Next week and I intend to try and find and clip/mark the Q but I could not cor the life of me find her when I installed them.

Got eggs though so she made it through the install.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
BSJ
Nurse Bee


Joined: 13 Apr 2015
Posts: 38
Location: Norfolk, UK

PostPosted: Sun Jun 19, 2016 1:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

AndyC wrote:
Oh right got you.

I had forgotten the frame converting, so your confining her to the top bar bit, got it.

On the frameless thing I only just last week pulled two frames of undrawn foundation and dropped in two with just 25mm of foundation at the top on the outside of the brood nest in a national.

The colony has only been in there since 5 June so a bit too early to disturb Them again I reckon.

Next week and I intend to try and find and clip/mark the Q but I could not cor the life of me find her when I installed them.

Got eggs though so she made it through the install.


Break a leg to us both, then Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
AugustC
Silver Bee


Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Mon Jun 20, 2016 11:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi BSJ

I am sorry not everything is going to plan.
btw the way another good thing about using the full round top bar guides is that you can squish the new made wax around them rather than use hangers etc. Obviously this is only a good idea when the comb is empty like the one you had. With honey and brood you need another option. I often just use a girdle of masking tape to keep the comb aligned to the top bar and rely on the sloped sides to take the comb weight. The bees then reattach the comb and chew away the masking tape later.

best of luck A
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
BSJ
Nurse Bee


Joined: 13 Apr 2015
Posts: 38
Location: Norfolk, UK

PostPosted: Mon Jun 20, 2016 5:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

AugustC wrote:
Hi BSJ

I am sorry not everything is going to plan.
btw the way another good thing about using the full round top bar guides is that you can squish the new made wax around them rather than use hangers etc. Obviously this is only a good idea when the comb is empty like the one you had. With honey and brood you need another option. I often just use a girdle of masking tape to keep the comb aligned to the top bar and rely on the sloped sides to take the comb weight. The bees then reattach the comb and chew away the masking tape later.

best of luck A


Thanks, AugustC. I will try that. Mine was FULL of brood though, throughout, all in different gestational stages it was fascinating. I have never seen brood so clearly as I did against such fresh comb. Plus, it was stronger than I expected virgin comb to be Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
AugustC
Silver Bee


Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Mon Jun 20, 2016 6:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

it is strong... just very very bendy
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
hsilgnede
House Bee


Joined: 13 Nov 2015
Posts: 23
Location: Co Clare, Ireland

PostPosted: Sat Jul 09, 2016 4:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I recently moved some bees from a national nuc to a top bar hive. I cut the frames with a lopper as seen in the video on Phil's youtube channel.

I put them in the hive but they were not sitting flush across the top, just resting about 3/4 way down.

I finally thought of getting some cable ties! Huzzah. There is nothing they can't do and I had some left over after a recent election when I was putting up those infernal election posters.

I ran the cable ties through the comb on the first one and then after realizing that was both stupid and unnecessary, I put them around the studs at the end that would usually sit outside the frame to enable you to lift them if they were still in a nation. This appears to have worked well. There is a small gap between the top bars now but its not side enough for a bee to fit through and it will go away once I cycle out the comb. There's a roof over the whole thing anyway so no issue with light or water etc getting in.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
BSJ
Nurse Bee


Joined: 13 Apr 2015
Posts: 38
Location: Norfolk, UK

PostPosted: Mon Jul 11, 2016 6:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello, what a good idea, I am a big fan of cable ties. How long were the ones you used?
Thanks
B
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
AugustC
Silver Bee


Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Mon Jul 11, 2016 10:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cables ties and duct tape are essential items in a beekeepers toolkit...in everyone's toolkit actually!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> Horizontal top bar hives All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

SPECIAL OFFER FOR UK FORUM MEMBERS - Buy your protective clothing here and get a special 15% discount! (use the code BAREFOOTBEEKEEPER at checkout and be sure to 'update basket')



Are the big energy companies bleeding you dry?


Is way too much of your hard-earned family income going up in smoke?

Are you worried about what could happen if the ageing grid system fails?

You need to watch this short video NOW to find out how YOU can cut your energy bills TO THE BONE within 30 days!

WATCH THE VIDEO NOW



(country selected automatically - UK/USA/CA/AU)

Conserving wild bees

Research suggests that bumble bee boxes have a very low success rate in actually attracting bees into them. We find that if you create an environment where first of all you can attract mice inside, such as a pile of stones, a drystone wall, paving slabs with intentionally made cavities underneath, this will increase the success rate.

Most bumble bee species need a dry space about the size a football, with a narrow entrance tunnel approximately 2cm in diameter and 20 cm long. Most species nest underground along the base of a linear feature such as a hedge or wall. Sites need to be sheltered and out of direct sunlight.

There is a spectacular display of wild bee hotels here

More about bumblebees and solitary bees here

Information about the Tree Bumblebee (Bombus hypnorum)

Barefoot Beekeeper Podcast



Now available from Lulu.com


Now available from Lulu.com


Now available from Lulu.com


4th Edition paperback now available from Lulu.com

See beekeeping books for details and links to ebook versions.
site map
php. BB © 2001, 2005 php. BB Group

View topic - The Transfer to TBH gets off to a mixed start - Natural Beekeeping Network Forum