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Dying young bes in front of hive

 
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choop26
New Bee


Joined: 30 Jun 2017
Posts: 7
Location: USA East Tennessee

PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 2017 12:39 pm    Post subject: Dying young bes in front of hive Reply with quote

This is my first season and one of my hives is very robust compared to the other--much more bees, just placed second honey super, etc. Queen is healthy, no signs of serious mite infestation, bees foraging normally all looks well--except two days ago I noticed very young bees being hauled out of the hive and left on the ground to die in front of the hive. The numbers are significant but not massive. There are a couple hundred dead bees in front of the hive, all young. I would say they were carrying them out at a rate of approx. 1-2 per minute.

Site is not allowing me to post pics since I am new, so please visit beemaster forum where topic is listed under same header for pics of a sticky board test. It looks like very tiny insects hatching from eggs. These are much smaller than varroa and shaped differently. Its heartbreaking to watch. I am very grateful for any help you folks can suggest.
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choop26
New Bee


Joined: 30 Jun 2017
Posts: 7
Location: USA East Tennessee

PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 2017 8:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Learned from an entomologist that what I am seeing is milkweed pollen. Its fascinating and wish you could see the pics.
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Nanny Ogg
Nurse Bee


Joined: 24 Mar 2017
Posts: 45
Location: Denmark, Fredericia

PostPosted: Mon Jul 03, 2017 5:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Are your bees still dying? And is it because of the pollen?
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choop26
New Bee


Joined: 30 Jun 2017
Posts: 7
Location: USA East Tennessee

PostPosted: Mon Jul 03, 2017 4:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes they are. It appeared the activity was declining but they are hauling out young bees at a approximate rate of 1-2 per minute. I have not gotten a definitive answer from the other forums yet, although it has resulted in some interesting discussion. I don't see anything wrong with the bees--wings and bodies look normal and nothing on them that I can see.
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Nanny Ogg
Nurse Bee


Joined: 24 Mar 2017
Posts: 45
Location: Denmark, Fredericia

PostPosted: Tue Jul 04, 2017 5:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hmm...what a mystery.

So is the population then declining if they keep hauling out all the young bees? Or is the rate of beecide slower than the rate of hatching new brood?
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choop26
New Bee


Joined: 30 Jun 2017
Posts: 7
Location: USA East Tennessee

PostPosted: Tue Jul 04, 2017 1:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's a good question. The numbers have increased and more adult bees in mix now. Negative sugar shake and sticky board for mites. They appear normal, totally baffled and heartbreaking for a newbie. Appreciate any help...
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Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1569
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Tue Jul 04, 2017 2:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would suspect it may be poisoning from pollen, perhaps from agricultural crops that have been sprayed with something. Adult bees don't eat pollen so would not be affected. Unfortunately the pollen these dead baby bees were fed on as larvae would have been collected about 3 weeks ago, so not necessarily something they are working now, which makes it difficult to figure out, but hopefully whatever it was will have mostly passed from the hive and current forage is healthy.

PS. I went over to the other site but unfortunately I am not able to view your images.... I guess because I am not a member. I'm not sure what milkweed is.... could it be the same as milky thistle here?
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choop26
New Bee


Joined: 30 Jun 2017
Posts: 7
Location: USA East Tennessee

PostPosted: Tue Jul 04, 2017 4:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In my heart of hearts that is what I suspect as well. That being said it appears a few more adults are in the mix...but I am unsure. It;s too bad about that pic access as they might help. I added pics of the dead bees. This hive is otherwise very strong, three supers from my very first nuc! Makes it all the more heartbreaking to watch though. I so much appreciate your feedback.
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choop26
New Bee


Joined: 30 Jun 2017
Posts: 7
Location: USA East Tennessee

PostPosted: Tue Jul 04, 2017 4:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

They are great sites, why not sign up?
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Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1569
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Tue Jul 04, 2017 7:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I already spend far too much time on forums when I should be doing other things and I'm afraid I can't be bothered to create a username and password (the bane of modern day life) just to view your photos..... only to find out it's my browser at fault and membership isn't the issue! Hopefully you will be able to post them here when you have a few more posts.

Regards

Barbara
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eltalia
Nurse Bee


Joined: 20 Jun 2017
Posts: 37
Location: Australia (Nth. Queensland)

PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2017 9:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

"Why not signup?"

Me I am shy.. yet straight talking.
You know the help I gave freely on the topic you also put on this site.
At a glance you valued that help on that site yet still today do not follow
with any update from the Prof's feedback on my suggestion.


Speaking for none other than myself I found that site to be run in a "clique",
and so restrictive in regard to open and transparent views contrary to
those held by those "in charge". In effect a managed society at the cost of
freedoms.
From Net experience and what was read, and still read (with pix), that site
is heavily populated with both "Dorothy Dixers" and "the blind leading the
blind". Be careful of what you wish for in absorption of many a post on
that site.

... jes sayin' , like.

Regards.

Bill
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choop26
New Bee


Joined: 30 Jun 2017
Posts: 7
Location: USA East Tennessee

PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2017 12:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Your "help" was actually a couple of questions about milkweed pollen and bees dropping uneaten pollen to the floor. AS I told you in my reply Bill, that I would ask the professor...he has yet to reply and may not. I don't have a clue what you mean by the second part of your post as I found some helpful information on my problem on these forums. As far as promptness in replying to you I have been involved in a death in the family and had to put many things on hold.

Here is our conversation from the other site:

"John Skinner says "pollinator is different" and I wonder what he means by that... ask him?
I get John is saying the bags are carried as detritus on the bee body and then cleaned off in the hive but why aren't the bees then storing the pollen, or eating it?
Allowing food to drop to the BB is not usual behavior, no?"

"I will ask the professor but it is a holiday week for academia and I don't want to "milk" him for his time. That being said, it is a darn good question I would think he would find interesting to share the answer. The food to drop to BB seems a more general question that somebody here may hopefully have some info on. I don't know if its usual or not. Thanks so much for the lead."
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eltalia
Nurse Bee


Joined: 20 Jun 2017
Posts: 37
Location: Australia (Nth. Queensland)

PostPosted: Sun Jul 23, 2017 12:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I probably shouldn't, but seeing as how you are a fresh starter, Choop, I'll
clarify the point I was making, which was;
you recommending content from another site you have posted the same
question to as a response to advice offered here isn't how someone
willing to provide full disclosure of a problem would operate.
Better to do the yards and repeat the full content with your post.
Links are an option where embedded pix are not permitted.
http://tinypic.com/r/29y2m0w/9

My post you now address was only generated as clearly you were not 'hearing'
responses given when you post "They are great sites", itself not a truism, as I
gave evidence of.
However let's not focus on the minor annoyance of a newbee defending poor
broadcast, I am sure all are interested in the probability milkweed pollinia is
harmful to brood... can we move on?

Cheers.


Bill
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