Please support Friends of the Bees to keep this forum free to use.

Natural Beekeeping International Forum
low-cost, low-impact, balanced beekeeping for everyone

 Forum FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileYour Profile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Please Read The Rules before posting.



(country selected automatically - UK/USA/CA/AU)
nucs this week

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> Beginners start here
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
gizmo
Nurse Bee


Joined: 24 Nov 2016
Posts: 31
Location: deland, Florida USA

PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2017 4:20 pm    Post subject: nucs this week Reply with quote

once again we will be trying our hand at beekeeping.

our last attempt with packaged bees proved to be, (NPI) a dismal failure.
within a week or so our bees had mostly died and the remainder swarmed off.
we were able to recapture them from a tree but they didn't stay for more than a few days.
this week we will be picking up two nucs with established hives with laying queens. our local keeper will also instruct us as to when & how we can transfer from the nuc combs to our top bar hive.

cheers,
gizmo
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1564
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2017 8:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You might have been better getting in touch with one of our forum members, Patrick Thomas. I'm pretty sure he is in Florida and does a lot of bee colony removals..... cut outs and trap outs. He could probably have sorted you out with a top bar nucleus colony or two.

Anyway, good luck. I hope you have more success this time. For the majority of us it would be far too late in the season to consider buying a nuc but I guess your climate doesn't create such limitations.

Best wishes

Barbara
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
gizmo
Nurse Bee


Joined: 24 Nov 2016
Posts: 31
Location: deland, Florida USA

PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2017 8:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

will look patrick up.....though florida is a big state....if he isn't close it would be difficult to obtain much from him.
as for our climate here in florida it is sub tropical with mild winters nothing lasting more than a few cold snaps in jan-feb. but we are talking about central florida and southward. the pan handle and north central do get colder weather with the panhandle and counties near the georgia border having light snow every so often .

cheers,
gizmo
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1564
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2017 9:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Patrick has a website..... www.savebeesflorida.com He does lots of You Tube videos of his cut outs and trap outs. He might be a useful contact for you if he is local.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
gizmo
Nurse Bee


Joined: 24 Nov 2016
Posts: 31
Location: deland, Florida USA

PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2017 10:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

thanx babara,

much obliged! Smile

gizmo
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
gizmo
Nurse Bee


Joined: 24 Nov 2016
Posts: 31
Location: deland, Florida USA

PostPosted: Tue Oct 03, 2017 5:28 pm    Post subject: nuc in hand Reply with quote

picked up the nucs today.......

was a bit blind sided about it all. thought the colony could stay in the nuc for a time until they filled out all five frames. was told they needed to be put into something less confining ASAP. consequently we purchased a starter langstrom box with a few more frames. we were instructed to allow the hive to mature then transfer them to our bar hive......so now we ride on both sides of the street...langstrom /top bar LOL! Smile
will be viewing youtube on transitioning to top bar...anyone care to share some tips about the transition phase feel free to share.
so far we have one failed package from last spring season...and about $650.00 investment on equipment, hives and bee's and nary a drop of golden elixir. Smile

gizmo
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
AndyC
Scout Bee


Joined: 04 Jul 2014
Posts: 286
Location: Uk/Horsham/RH13

PostPosted: Tue Oct 03, 2017 8:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hiya

So now it starts . . .

If your aim is honey then I would leave them in the Langstroth and use supers and foundation so it can be harvested easily, when they are ready, take a split into the TBH.

It's much easier to shake a mess of bees into the TBH than it is to cut and shut foundation.

You might Read up on the Taranov method too.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
gizmo
Nurse Bee


Joined: 24 Nov 2016
Posts: 31
Location: deland, Florida USA

PostPosted: Tue Oct 03, 2017 10:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

thank you AndyC for your tip.

will read up on the taranov method too.
cheers,
gizmo
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
gizmo
Nurse Bee


Joined: 24 Nov 2016
Posts: 31
Location: deland, Florida USA

PostPosted: Wed Oct 04, 2017 9:13 pm    Post subject: transfer from standard frame to top -bar Reply with quote

greetings,

we are prepared to continue with the standard langstroth hive until it is ready to split. than we are considering using this method from phil chandler:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pRN2RjxOxAI

except, we will place the hive upon our top bar hive....covering the rest of the top not covered by the hive with plywood....
below is another alternative method......

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ugLHWkhan44

so far so good, installed SHB traps today....here in the south USA they pose a problem.

cheers,
gizmo
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
AndyC
Scout Bee


Joined: 04 Jul 2014
Posts: 286
Location: Uk/Horsham/RH13

PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 2017 7:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Seems a shame to get them all settled and then transfer the whole colony and end up with an empty Langstroth and however you do that it is a lot of faffing about when you could do a split into the TBH later that is easier.
Even using the end boards and just three bars to make a queen rearing hive so with a queen cell and a few cups full of young bees should work in the TBH.
Or collect a swarm in the season and shake them into the TBH that is the easiest option.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
gizmo
Nurse Bee


Joined: 24 Nov 2016
Posts: 31
Location: deland, Florida USA

PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 2017 7:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hello AndyC,
some potential methods there thanx for sharing. as a novice the phil chandler method seemed easiest to do. unless we misunderstood the video phil was transferring from the langstroth to the top bar because the hive was ready to split. phil just sets the hive onto the top bar, which has the bars cut out 3/8" on one side to allow bee space. we are all new at this bee stuff and inferred that the overcrowded hive would use the additional space to branch off to. presently we are just hoping this hive just two days old will mature enough to expand.
our last package bees was failure so we went with a nuc this time around from a local commercial keeper. at this moment queen cups and advanced stuff like that are still in the learning curve ....
cheers
gizmo
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
AndyC
Scout Bee


Joined: 04 Jul 2014
Posts: 286
Location: Uk/Horsham/RH13

PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 2017 9:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Heh Gizmo

Yep understood. I have not had any success with getting girls to take up residence in any empty hive either above or below their current home hence my mentioning the alternate methods.

My best guess was it simply was not what they wanted at the time.

Ask five beekeepers how to do something and you will get ten answers.

Ask forty thousand bees and . . . Well you get the general idea.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
gizmo
Nurse Bee


Joined: 24 Nov 2016
Posts: 31
Location: deland, Florida USA

PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 2017 10:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

yes....will keep our progress posted.....

cheers to all!

gizmo
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
gizmo
Nurse Bee


Joined: 24 Nov 2016
Posts: 31
Location: deland, Florida USA

PostPosted: Tue Oct 10, 2017 10:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hello friends,

recently became aware of another technique for transferring a langstroth hive into a top bar.
the author of the article Les Crowder uses a top bar hive with a four inch hole cut in the center of the bottom, which he then places over a langstroth hive with the top removed. though the article didn't state but we suspect Les uses a piece of plywood placed over the langstroth hive with a hole of the same size cut into the center which will cover the hive end to end. then places the top bar centered over the hole in the plywood. this way the hive has protection from rain.
this technique allows the bees to go up into the new hive....as opposed to phil chandler method of bees going down....
guessing the decision for either one is the bees ! Wink

gizmo
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
AndyC
Scout Bee


Joined: 04 Jul 2014
Posts: 286
Location: Uk/Horsham/RH13

PostPosted: Wed Oct 11, 2017 6:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It may work.
I tried putting a nuc of bees under a TBH with an adaptor plate between them and six bars of space.
Left it for four weeks and no sign of wax building in the tbh.
Left it another four weeks and still no sign of building in the TBH so due to time constraints, caught the queen, cut out and wired some brood and stores into bars and shook them in.
Sorry to say IMHO you really are making this hard for yourself.
Your choice and good luck.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
gizmo
Nurse Bee


Joined: 24 Nov 2016
Posts: 31
Location: deland, Florida USA

PostPosted: Wed Oct 11, 2017 11:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

no worries.........
this is a procedure for down the road when the langstroth get full.

one guy uses the upward transfer
the other the downward....

am considering going for another nuc and transferring the frames lengthwise in the TBH ans use wedges to keep them steady...that hive has about four bars of varying sized white comb.

cheers
gizmo
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
AndyC
Scout Bee


Joined: 04 Jul 2014
Posts: 286
Location: Uk/Horsham/RH13

PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2017 6:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another simpler option comes to mind although I have not tried it is to remove an outside frame or two from the nuc, make a gap in the centre and put top bars in there.
And keep doing that until all the frames have been replaced with natural comb then transfer them to the TBH.
Depending on the NUC and top bars you might need to rig up a special eke or some spacers to hold the bars and the nuc lid properly.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
gizmo
Nurse Bee


Joined: 24 Nov 2016
Posts: 31
Location: deland, Florida USA

PostPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 11:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hey andyC

yes, we have read about the method you are describing.

last week we inspected the hive and located the queen. next visit we mark her.

cheers.....
gizmo
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
eltalia
Nurse Bee


Joined: 20 Jun 2017
Posts: 28
Location: Australia (Nth. Queensland)

PostPosted: Thu Oct 19, 2017 1:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

@gizmo

For your further consideration I put yet another method of introducing the
active Lang colony to a TBH. A variation of one step of the method I use for trapouts, this option requires inital setup and then walk away.
I was to begin my transfer this week however early rains have us all huddled inside sipping tea! The method is a first of this application, for me.

Setting drawn brood comb - 4 frames/bars minimum - adjacent the entrance (QX in place) to the TBH, I make a 65mm penetration in the opposite end, joining to the sealed Lang mounted beside the TBH using 300mm X 50mm PVC tube and allowing the tube tp penetrate the TBH by at least 100mm. Using a 50mm cap and a 25mm screwed adaptor I fashion a bee-escape in the adaptor which allows all bees to pass through, one way, into the TBH.
To begin the exit from the Lang I apply some smoke to the ventilation penetration in the Lang.
First inspection is after 7 days.

I did intend to post the advice earlier but unfortunately the server has
been only giving me disconnects these last days.

Bill
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
AndyC
Scout Bee


Joined: 04 Jul 2014
Posts: 286
Location: Uk/Horsham/RH13

PostPosted: Thu Oct 19, 2017 2:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

gizmo wrote:
hey andyC

yes, we have read about the method you are describing.

last week we inspected the hive and located the queen. next visit we mark her.

cheers.....
gizmo


If your going to catch and mark (clip too?) the Q why not just put here in a cage in the TBH and shake the rest of the bees in and release her the following day?

OK you lose whatever sealed brood is in the frames but at least they are safely installed in the TBH.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
gizmo
Nurse Bee


Joined: 24 Nov 2016
Posts: 31
Location: deland, Florida USA

PostPosted: Thu Oct 19, 2017 11:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

good question andyC.

marking her so my old eyes can catch sight of the Q easily,

clip her....as in clipping the wings....like a chicken?

we will probably wait for this hive to mature , fill in the rest of the hive before transferring into a new home.
we have little to none experience in this hobby and cold feet from the last failure.
but do read to learn about the methods that are out there that keepers are using.

cheers
gizmo
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
eltalia
Nurse Bee


Joined: 20 Jun 2017
Posts: 28
Location: Australia (Nth. Queensland)

PostPosted: Thu Oct 19, 2017 11:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

[quote="AndyC"][quote="gizmo"]hey andyC

yes, we have read about the method you are describing.

last week we inspected the hive and located the queen. next visit we mark her.

cheers.....
gizmo[/quote]

If your going to catch and mark (clip too?) the Q why not just put here in a cage in the TBH and shake the rest of the bees in and release her the following day?

OK you lose whatever sealed brood is in the frames but at least they are safely installed in the TBH.[/quote]

@andyC @gismo

Given the supplier beleived the nucs were crowded I would have thought
your suggestion was the first option, together with cobbling the nuc brood
frames into the TBH, temporarily. The guy must have suggested the Lang
option for a reason... beats me what that was. /shrug/
If this option still exists I would urge @gismo to go there, fitting a queen
restrictor to the TBH entrance for at least 10days after the the exchange.

Bill
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
eltalia
Nurse Bee


Joined: 20 Jun 2017
Posts: 28
Location: Australia (Nth. Queensland)

PostPosted: Thu Oct 19, 2017 11:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

[quote="gizmo"]good question andyC.

marking her so my old eyes can catch sight of the Q easily,

clip her....as in clipping the wings....like a chicken?

we will probably wait for this hive to mature , fill in the rest of the hive before transferring into a new home.
we have little to none experience in this hobby and cold feet from the last failure.
but do read to learn about the methods that are out there that keepers are using.

cheers
gizmo[/quote]


In Florida at this time of year you have enough foraging to
have this maturing happen? Or are you looking at next Spring?
Where there is little to no flow happening the bees may be better off
being let bee... in the nucs.
Anything as a change is going to require some swift handling and close
monitoring, so where you are unsure of conditions/ability(yours) it may
be best to do nothing as come the first flows of warmer weather the best
chance of change being beneficial is present.

Bill
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> Beginners start here All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

SPECIAL OFFER FOR UK FORUM MEMBERS - Buy your protective clothing here and get a special 15% discount! (use the code BAREFOOTBEEKEEPER at checkout and be sure to 'update basket')



Are the big energy companies bleeding you dry?


Is way too much of your hard-earned family income going up in smoke?

Are you worried about what could happen if the ageing grid system fails?

You need to watch this short video NOW to find out how YOU can cut your energy bills TO THE BONE within 30 days!

WATCH THE VIDEO NOW



(country selected automatically - UK/USA/CA/AU)

Conserving wild bees

Research suggests that bumble bee boxes have a very low success rate in actually attracting bees into them. We find that if you create an environment where first of all you can attract mice inside, such as a pile of stones, a drystone wall, paving slabs with intentionally made cavities underneath, this will increase the success rate.

Most bumble bee species need a dry space about the size a football, with a narrow entrance tunnel approximately 2cm in diameter and 20 cm long. Most species nest underground along the base of a linear feature such as a hedge or wall. Sites need to be sheltered and out of direct sunlight.

There is a spectacular display of wild bee hotels here

More about bumblebees and solitary bees here

Information about the Tree Bumblebee (Bombus hypnorum)

Barefoot Beekeeper Podcast



Now available from Lulu.com


Now available from Lulu.com


Now available from Lulu.com


4th Edition paperback now available from Lulu.com

See beekeeping books for details and links to ebook versions.
site map
php. BB © 2001, 2005 php. BB Group

View topic - nucs this week - Natural Beekeeping Network Forum