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Semi-messy removal from old abandoned couch

 
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Patrick Thomas
Foraging Bee


Joined: 29 May 2012
Posts: 195
Location: Florida, USA

PostPosted: Tue Oct 31, 2017 12:15 am    Post subject: Semi-messy removal from old abandoned couch Reply with quote

.

I know some of you are going to jump all over me for how messy this got, but it was one of those situations where things were bound to get a bit messy.

HOWEVER, this removal will still be a success.

If nothing else, I think you all will enjoy the footage.

So anyhow, enjoy the chaos, lol:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dkzS2D0trPg&t=8s


.
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Adriaan
Guard Bee


Joined: 18 Jan 2016
Posts: 92
Location: central Belgium

PostPosted: Tue Oct 31, 2017 6:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Patrick,

Thanks for the video, impressive work, not too messy considering everything.

I do envy you for living in such a bee-active place. I never got the chance to do a cut out myself.

a few questions:
-why not remove the cauch once you cut out the comb?
-What would happen if you accidentally spray the queen with honeybee-gone
-did you finally find her?

friendly greetings

Adriaan

ps keep the video's coming.
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catchercradle
Golden Bee


Joined: 31 May 2010
Posts: 1492
Location: Cambridge, UK

PostPosted: Tue Oct 31, 2017 8:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice. Only ever done one cut out..

Quote:
-What would happen if you accidentally spray the queen with honeybee-gone


My guess is that the queen did go in. Never used honeybegone myself. If by any chance the queen did get killed based on the larvae being there my guess is the colony would be able to raise a new one so long as some of the larvae were less than three days old.
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eltalia
Guard Bee


Joined: 20 Jun 2017
Posts: 52
Location: Australia (Nth. Queensland)

PostPosted: Tue Oct 31, 2017 9:56 am    Post subject: Re: Semi-messy removal from old abandoned couch Reply with quote

Patrick Thomas wrote:
.

I know some of you are going to jump all over me for how messy this got, but it was one of those situations where things were bound to get a bit messy.

Those two edjuts who gave your earlier video over in BS.com a pasting have left the building, I reckon. Forget those types, they do nothing but yap
in frustration seeing done what they wish they could do - but cannot as
the skills aren't in their kit.. enuff said, your work owns all the hallmarks of success. You could earn a good quid (dollar) at this, in a busy season.

I doubt you will extract adverse comments here @ biobee.com Smile


Quote:

HOWEVER, this removal will still be a success.
If nothing else, I think you all will enjoy the footage.

As expertly executed as the others I have seen. That was a lot of bees for
that space, I reckon they were building to a swarming in short time, hence the excesssive drones for that space together with the stores being built.
Sure was a great looking brood pattern on combs seen.
The lemongrass may have confused the issue some but those numbers of bees clustering on the box says to me you got the queen in there early. That number of bees, doing the honeycomb first, and so close to the ground, you may have missed her being herded into the box.

Comments?
I do use a homemade brew of HBG myself, but rarely- and only as a last resort, mostly. Simply because it is difficult to control where the vapours go, especially on a warm day. I do not believe the component chemicals(?) kill any bee with direct contact but in an enclosed space they can easily suffocate on it. That job was not that type scenario.
I've yet to try LG myself so I would only comment it may confuse observations as to what is happening.
One thing I do always do is provide a ramp, anything handy - but I do carry a canvas sheet as a standard 'fix'... it doubles as tarp to seal up odd shaped colony containers as that sofa so I can do a trapout.
With a ramp, and smoke applied as encouragement, "the march" to a new home is something always warming to witness.

Quote:


So anyhow, enjoy the chaos, lol:
https://www.you tube.com/watch?v=dkzS2D0trPg&t=8s


.... normal day in the shop I reckon. This work gets a little "off the wall" sometimes as them bees are not as predictable as Man likes to believe Wink

Bill
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eltalia
Guard Bee


Joined: 20 Jun 2017
Posts: 52
Location: Australia (Nth. Queensland)

PostPosted: Tue Oct 31, 2017 10:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Adriaan wrote:

I do envy you for living in such a bee-active place. I never got the chance to do a cut out myself.



And my sincere xommisserationa for that lack of opportunity Adriann, you read as a person who would both enjoy the work and become very proficient at it. Buuut the upside is that while folks as Patrick post the work
you can still learn much about bees in nature as that is the prime aspect
of "bee hunting" one picks up on.
Like look at where the sun travels (shadow line) and note the structure
of the colony resulting, naturally. Checkout the comb arrangement and quantities of stores as against brood. There is so much more and it is all there in a well put together video Smile

Bill
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Patrick Thomas
Foraging Bee


Joined: 29 May 2012
Posts: 195
Location: Florida, USA

PostPosted: Tue Oct 31, 2017 2:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Adriaan wrote:
Hi Patrick,

Thanks for the video, impressive work, not too messy considering everything.

I do envy you for living in such a bee-active place. I never got the chance to do a cut out myself.

a few questions:
-why not remove the cauch once you cut out the comb?
-What would happen if you accidentally spray the queen with honeybee-gone
-did you finally find her?

friendly greetings

Adriaan

ps keep the video's coming.



Thanks so much for the kind words, first off. Smile

Regarding moving the couch, I didn't want to tear that thing apart or move it too much because no telling what kind of creatures could be waiting inside or underneath, including snakes....lol.

If I sprayed the queen with Honey B Gone, it wouldn't be preferred. It wouldn't necessarily kill her, but it could make her fly off or injure her. Normally in my cut-outs, I will remove all the comb, capture the queen, smoke the remaining bees out of the cavity and THEN spray Honey B Gone at the end. It is not good to spray the stuff directly on bees, queen or not.

I haven't found her yet. However, when I go back to get them soon, I will film an update video and post it here.

.
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Patrick Thomas
Foraging Bee


Joined: 29 May 2012
Posts: 195
Location: Florida, USA

PostPosted: Tue Oct 31, 2017 2:52 pm    Post subject: Re: Semi-messy removal from old abandoned couch Reply with quote

eltalia wrote:
Patrick Thomas wrote:
.

I know some of you are going to jump all over me for how messy this got, but it was one of those situations where things were bound to get a bit messy.

Those two edjuts who gave your earlier video over in BS.com a pasting have left the building, I reckon. Forget those types, they do nothing but yap
in frustration seeing done what they wish they could do - but cannot as
the skills aren't in their kit.. enuff said, your work owns all the hallmarks of success. You could earn a good quid (dollar) at this, in a busy season.

I doubt you will extract adverse comments here @ biobee.com Smile


Quote:

HOWEVER, this removal will still be a success.
If nothing else, I think you all will enjoy the footage.

As expertly executed as the others I have seen. That was a lot of bees for
that space, I reckon they were building to a swarming in short time, hence the excesssive drones for that space together with the stores being built.
Sure was a great looking brood pattern on combs seen.
The lemongrass may have confused the issue some but those numbers of bees clustering on the box says to me you got the queen in there early. That number of bees, doing the honeycomb first, and so close to the ground, you may have missed her being herded into the box.

Comments?
I do use a homemade brew of HBG myself, but rarely- and only as a last resort, mostly. Simply because it is difficult to control where the vapours go, especially on a warm day. I do not believe the component chemicals(?) kill any bee with direct contact but in an enclosed space they can easily suffocate on it. That job was not that type scenario.
I've yet to try LG myself so I would only comment it may confuse observations as to what is happening.
One thing I do always do is provide a ramp, anything handy - but I do carry a canvas sheet as a standard 'fix'... it doubles as tarp to seal up odd shaped colony containers as that sofa so I can do a trapout.
With a ramp, and smoke applied as encouragement, "the march" to a new home is something always warming to witness.

Quote:


So anyhow, enjoy the chaos, lol:
https://www.you tube.com/watch?v=dkzS2D0trPg&t=8s


.... normal day in the shop I reckon. This work gets a little "off the wall" sometimes as them bees are not as predictable as Man likes to believe Wink

Bill


Wow, so much to comment on. I agree with everything you say and points well taken. Regarding negative comments, I don't mind it when people give constructive criticism, but some of those guys were relentless with no diplomatic skills, whatsoever.

Yeah the reason I pulled the trigger with the lemongrass oil was an insurance policy due to me not knowing for sure where the queen is. I would never use it if I had the queen in a clip. It's not an ideal situation, but it's a compromise I feel I must make.

Thanks so much for the kind comments and comments in general. Smile

.
.
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AndyC
Scout Bee


Joined: 04 Jul 2014
Posts: 301
Location: Uk/Horsham/RH13

PostPosted: Tue Oct 31, 2017 3:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not as messy as one I had above head height in several sections of a front door entrance canopy with multiple combs bridging the rafters.
Honey dripping down, multiple entrances and the lady of the house looking on.
Never again.
Good job Sir, more power to you.
I’ve decided cut outs are not for me.
Are we too far for you to travel?
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Patrick Thomas
Foraging Bee


Joined: 29 May 2012
Posts: 195
Location: Florida, USA

PostPosted: Tue Oct 31, 2017 4:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

AndyC wrote:

Are we too far for you to travel?


I'll only go as far as Swindon. Laughing

But thanks for the story and for the kind comments.
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eltalia
Guard Bee


Joined: 20 Jun 2017
Posts: 52
Location: Australia (Nth. Queensland)

PostPosted: Thu Nov 02, 2017 9:18 am    Post subject: Re: Semi-messy removal from old abandoned couch Reply with quote

[quote="Patrick Thomas"][quote="eltalia"]
Patrick Thomas wrote:
.
Wow, so much to comment on.
(edit)
Thanks so much for the kind comments and comments in general. Smile



No worries Patrick.. it is maybe of value to others interested
in learning
methods to know what is a workable way to
proceed... not for a nanosecond setting my comments up as
an Oracle post just simply
acknowledging the thought you put
into the work. That work that low to the ground would be very
difficult for myself these days, creaky knees considered Smile
Would you kindly update on the queenright status..?.. three days
we should be seeing queencells if that queen didn't make it.... cheerio

Bill
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eltalia
Guard Bee


Joined: 20 Jun 2017
Posts: 52
Location: Australia (Nth. Queensland)

PostPosted: Sun Nov 05, 2017 9:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

(bump)
Any news on Queenie, Patrick ?

Bill
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Patrick Thomas
Foraging Bee


Joined: 29 May 2012
Posts: 195
Location: Florida, USA

PostPosted: Thu Nov 16, 2017 8:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

.

I don't THINK I posted this yet above, but here's part II of this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YR-IsjPOsz4&t=1s


.
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