Please support Friends of the Bees to keep this forum free to use.

Natural Beekeeping International Forum
low-cost, low-impact, balanced beekeeping for everyone

 Forum FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileYour Profile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Please Read The Rules before posting.



(country selected automatically - UK/USA/CA/AU)
Asian Hornet News Update

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> Announcements: Read This First
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
biobee
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 1058
Location: UK, England, S. Devon

PostPosted: Mon Jan 01, 2018 4:55 pm    Post subject: Asian Hornet News Update Reply with quote

So that everyone has quick access to the National Bee Unit updates on the Asian Hornet, I have added a feed to this page

http://www.biobees.com/bee-keeping-news.php

You can access it directly from the top menu.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
catchercradle
Golden Bee


Joined: 31 May 2010
Posts: 1523
Location: Cambridge, UK

PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2018 4:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for this,

I must admit I suspect that long term we are going to have to learn to live with the Asian Hornet, the only thing that isn't clear yet is whether it will establish itself before or after I get too old to carry on keeping bees myself Very Happy
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
biobee
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 1058
Location: UK, England, S. Devon

PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2018 4:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think it is an inevitable consequence of globalization. The fact that they were found in two locations in Devon, separated by 80 miles, far from the previous known locations in Wales and Gloucestershire, is an early indication that we are about to be attacked from multiple entry points. It is easy for a solitary queen to hitch a ride on a ferry under a car, caravan or trailer - or somewhere on the ferry itself - and hop off at this end to find plentiful new territory in which to establish a nest.

I have heard from several beekeepers in France who tell me that they have made it much more difficult to keep bees than before they arrived. We will have to do our best to keep them out, of course, but I can see FERA giving up on this pretty fast when they find their meagre resources stretched to breaking point, which I would guess will happen sometime this year or next.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Adriaan
Foraging Bee


Joined: 18 Jan 2016
Posts: 123
Location: central Belgium

PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2018 5:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The asian hornet situation in Belgium is possibly even worse. In 2017 at least 7 nests have been identified and destroyed, mostly in the south-west.
Two of them were not found untill late autumn and had already sent out hundreds of queens. Probably not all nests have been found.
New queens may fly 60 km before overwintering and starting a new nest in the following spring.

This spring I will install several monitoring traps.

friendly greetings

Adriaan
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
biobee
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 1058
Location: UK, England, S. Devon

PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2018 6:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good luck, Adriaan! I'm thinking of buying a shotgun for the first time in my life...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
catchercradle
Golden Bee


Joined: 31 May 2010
Posts: 1523
Location: Cambridge, UK

PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 8:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I might set up some monitoring traps too. If I find a nest, I am guessing that the method I occasionally use for wasps of covering them with a large pile of grass clippings that will heat up as they rot down will work.

Usually I ignore wasps nests but just occasionally they build one in a place that is too inconvenient for me to live with.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Adriaan
Foraging Bee


Joined: 18 Jan 2016
Posts: 123
Location: central Belgium

PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 12:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Monitoring traps are best used in early spring when the young queens go out to find energie rich food to help them build an embryonic nest. This nest is not very high off the ground.
Somewhat later when their numbers reach maybe 50, they swarm and build a new nest high in a treetop where they are nearly invisible and untouchable.
You would need a huge pile of grass to cover that nest.

my plan is to call in the proper authorities and let them deal with it

friendly greetings

Adriaan
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
charentejohn
Foraging Bee


Joined: 26 May 2012
Posts: 103
Location: Central France - Charente

PostPosted: Fri Aug 31, 2018 10:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi, looks like this may be a good place to relate my story and ideas. I am in France (Charente) and noticed the first in this particular area last year. Now they seem to be established so I will need to take some action.

Hopefully this will help some UK keepers, see end of post for details.

I had a bird box the bees decided to use, this is a long saga so if you are interested search for charentejohn posts some with photos.
They are now in a shady spot and have been happy for a couple of years. I don't collect honey just leave them alone unless they need help, they did and do.

Neighbours doing some burning so checked bees were ok, they are next to a TBH I was hoping they would use. Horrified to find Asian Hornets in it, right next to the bees... So checked here and they have a 'shoot to kill' policy and all asian hornets must be reported and will be destroyed, local mayor's office pays half the cost if on your land.

So someone came and powder filled the TBH and the hornets died. Some returning ones were really mad and attacked the bees some going inside the hive. All calmed down but after a week or so I noticed a couple and the bees were pinned down with only a few foragers out.

Since then up to 4 have been around so I tried to proof the hive as follows, put mesh with string tied to hang down, like grass only the other way. Bees ok hornets not happy, not really good though so.....

What I have done/will do.
I made a 'muzzle' to cover the front, 13mm mesh bent and fitted to a shelf. You could just make one piece and hang it from a couple of hooks on the hive as long as it covers the entrance. Bees confused then did, land on wire and immediately take off again to go into the hive. Now getting better at it, they seem to prefer dropping down on the mesh from above in one move.
Hornets don't go inside, except by mistake, and if so immediately try to leave. They hang about but have a larger area to cover. As in photo the strings are also an inconvenience. Just watched one chase 6 bees around for a few mins before catching one. They seem to have a few flying about outside the mesh, some foragers out and about but not many.

How to catch hornets, use a butterfly net. You can buy kids ones but a friend is making me one from thick wire and net curtain material. I have a rough one using wire and a flower bulb sack but too floppy.
The hornets are intent on the bees so just hold the net on a 1m+pole underneath them. Then quick up and fold over and off to spray or dunk in a bucket of water. This really works well with no flailing of swatters or putting out bait.

I am awaiting delivery of the Thorne trap as it says asian hornet specific and can be placed next to bees. If the claims are right I will let you know, can't find any reviews. I will need to do something like that as the hive is 'wild' so I am not always there.
If it works I will put out traps in the area in spring in neighbour's gardens too as they want rid of them as well.
http://www.veto-pharma.eu/26-asian-hornet-control

In conclusion the hornets have probably done some damage but slowed for now. I will feed bees some fondant in small doses when hornet traps out to make up for any loss of foraging.
Hopefully photos work, can't figure out img bit




[/img]
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
charentejohn
Foraging Bee


Joined: 26 May 2012
Posts: 103
Location: Central France - Charente

PostPosted: Fri Aug 31, 2018 11:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Also forgot to mention thermal imaging. One problem is, we know there is a nest somewhere but where as it will be up in the trees. I haven't tried it but have asked the Mayor's office to see if they have one.
Can be bought on the likes of Aliexpress or Amazon from as little as £90 if a group wanted one, just has to show heat sources.
I think the local fire brigade would have one so may be willing to try it out. Early morning when cool should show nests in the canopy. Not a great video but shows a small wasp nest in hedge https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1UAiO5vubRY Would give an idea where nests are which can then be checked to see if Asian Hornets.
Just some thoughts to pass on for the future. They will never go away now just need to hold them back while bees adjust.

Neighbour saw one killing a wasp on his driveway so not just bees but all other insects.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
sonlam
New Bee


Joined: 13 Sep 2018
Posts: 6
Location: HCM

PostPosted: Fri Sep 14, 2018 9:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is a good idea
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> Announcements: Read This First All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

SPECIAL OFFER FOR UK FORUM MEMBERS - Buy your protective clothing here and get a special 15% discount! (use the code BAREFOOTBEEKEEPER at checkout and be sure to 'update basket')



Are the big energy companies bleeding you dry?


Is way too much of your hard-earned family income going up in smoke?

Are you worried about what could happen if the ageing grid system fails?

You need to watch this short video NOW to find out how YOU can cut your energy bills TO THE BONE within 30 days!

WATCH THE VIDEO NOW



(country selected automatically - UK/USA/CA/AU)

Conserving wild bees

Research suggests that bumble bee boxes have a very low success rate in actually attracting bees into them. We find that if you create an environment where first of all you can attract mice inside, such as a pile of stones, a drystone wall, paving slabs with intentionally made cavities underneath, this will increase the success rate.

Most bumble bee species need a dry space about the size a football, with a narrow entrance tunnel approximately 2cm in diameter and 20 cm long. Most species nest underground along the base of a linear feature such as a hedge or wall. Sites need to be sheltered and out of direct sunlight.

There is a spectacular display of wild bee hotels here

More about bumblebees and solitary bees here

Information about the Tree Bumblebee (Bombus hypnorum)

Barefoot Beekeeper Podcast



Now available from Lulu.com


Now available from Lulu.com


Now available from Lulu.com


4th Edition paperback now available from Lulu.com

See beekeeping books for details and links to ebook versions.
site map
php. BB © 2001, 2005 php. BB Group

View topic - Asian Hornet News Update - Natural Beekeeping Network Forum