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Beekeeping as intangible cultural heritage

 
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aspr
New Bee


Joined: 23 Nov 2019
Posts: 3
Location: Nottingham

PostPosted: Sat Nov 23, 2019 5:54 pm    Post subject: Beekeeping as intangible cultural heritage Reply with quote

Hello, my name is Andreia and I'm a Museum and Heritage Development MA Student.

I would like to ask in the forum a few questions about beekeeping traditions and the personal views in the beekeeping practices.

I'm building an Academic Report on Beekeeping as intangible cultural heritage following the UNESCO Designation in order to classify honeybee as a living museum and a collectable treasure for all humankind and I'm trying to collect data to support my findings



I would like you to consider my questions bellow.

1. What makes you take up beekeeping and become a beekeeper?

2. Did you learn the art of beekeeping from someone? From whom?

3. What has beekeeping meant to you?

4. Do you see the beekeeping practices as part of your cultural heritage? Is it part of your family, community or nation?

5. As a beekeeper, do you become more sensitive or more in tuned to nature - the weather and environment?

6. What's the most fulfilling part of a beekeeper's job?

7. Do you see Beekeeping as a profitable job or just a hobby?

8. As a beekeeper, do you think that Honeybees can be view as living museum and should be collected and preserved in prow of the future generations?

9. How are you as a beekeeper contributing to the health of honeybees?

10. Can Beekeeping practices be recognised as intangible heritage under the UNESCO Convention?

And finally

11. Do you see the beekeeping practices being lost to the future generations? If so, what actions you think should be taken to address this issue.

Thank you so much for your participation. I look forward to read your answers.


Andreia R
[/b]
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mita
New Bee


Joined: 14 Dec 2019
Posts: 2
Location: Slovenia

PostPosted: Sat Dec 14, 2019 9:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

if you didn't got enough replays here i recommend you try at reddit
reddit . com /r/ Beekeeping/
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BobTheBuilder
House Bee


Joined: 17 Nov 2019
Posts: 15
Location: Belgium / Waregem

PostPosted: Tue Dec 17, 2019 8:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

1.What made you take up beekeeping and become a beekeeper?

I started a vegetable garden about 6 years back and started reading about pollination. Then the more I knew about bees the more I wanted to know. And finally I just had to get them to have hands on experience.

2. Did you learn the art of beekeeping from someone? From whom?
I started out with learning myself through the internet, reading forums, blogs and watching YouTube. But before I got bees I drowned myself in the differences out there. So I decided to take a beekeeping course. I knew most of the stuff they teach you there already, but talking to actual people beats the internet any day! - just don't argue and value everybody's opinion.

3. What has beekeeping meant to you?
It meant getting a second job (I became a beekeeper after my working hours) and in 2020 I'll become a teacher even in beekeeping!

4. Do you see the beekeeping practices as part of your cultural heritage? Is it part of your family, community or nation?
Not very much. Nobody in my family that I know of kept bees before, but reading up on history, it was not uncommon in years past for people to have bees.

5. As a beekeeper, do you become more sensitive or more in tuned to nature - the weather and environment?
YES. I used to walk my dog and not notice anything, now I notice the blooming flowers, the insects. I have a greater interest in forecasts and always relate the weather with how my bees will react to it.

6. What's the most fulfilling part of a beekeeper's job?
Being able to work with a huge amount of insects that are all able to sting you, but if you read them right you almost never get stung.

7. Do you see Beekeeping as a profitable job or just a hobby?
It is not a profitable job unless you have enough hives, but then you lose touch with the natural part of things in my opinion. So it's better to keep it a hobby.

8. As a beekeeper, do you think that Honeybees can be viewed as living museum and should be collected and preserved in prow of the future generations?
I hope that rewilding projects get a foothold. I do believe that bees as a wild species should be protected. I also hope that there will always be beekeepers around. For honey is very tasty and good for you!

9. How are you as a beekeeper contributing to the health of honeybees?
I have adopted the natural way of beekeeping and stop selecting for traits I want as soon as I see them struggle. Then I let nature decide what kind of bees do best in my region.

10. Can Beekeeping practices be recognised as intangible heritage under the UNESCO Convention?
Yes I do. There are a lot of cultures that have been beekeeping for a while now, even if it started out as bee-hunting.

11. Do you see the beekeeping practices being lost to the future generations? If so, what actions you think should be taken to address this issue.
I do not. There will always be people who like nature and/or bees. So there will always be beekeepers. I only hope the future generations have more respect for nature than what we have shown since we started our agriculture. We need to work with rather than against nature to keep ourselves alive.
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