Please support Friends of the Bees to keep this forum free to use.

Natural Beekeeping International Forum
low-cost, low-impact, balanced beekeeping for everyone

 Forum FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileYour Profile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Please Read The Rules before posting.



(country selected automatically - UK/USA/CA/AU)
Varroa out of control - what pesticides got to do with it

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> Environmental issues, GM, pesticides and campaigning
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2012 1:29 pm    Post subject: Varroa out of control - what pesticides got to do with it Reply with quote

Varroa out of control - what pesticides got to do with it

http://www.immenfreunde.de/docs/PKB_engl.pdf

Put down a summary of what I think is the trouble with pesticides and bees.

Bernhard
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
biobee
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 1055
Location: UK, England, S. Devon

PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2012 6:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Brilliant work, Bernhard - a clear summary.
Thank you.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Che Guebuddha
Golden Bee


Joined: 31 Jan 2012
Posts: 1549
Location: Hårlev, Stevns Kommune, Denmark

PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2012 8:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice. I placed it on my blog into the Links section. Well worth propagating.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Mark Young
Scout Bee


Joined: 27 Jan 2011
Posts: 277
Location: High Weald, Kent, England

PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 11:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Brilliant Bernhard.

I will share this with others...

Thank you.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
BeeBuzz
Foraging Bee


Joined: 07 Oct 2010
Posts: 111
Location: N. Wales, UK

PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2013 11:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Please see this link - do neonicotinoids somehow 'assist' Varroa mite? - I actually think they probably do!


http://www.buzzaboutbees.net/neonicotinoids-and-varroa-mite.html
_________________
www.buzzaboutbees.net
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Thu Mar 07, 2013 7:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Info about neonics and farmland wildlife in the UK. And usage of neonics in the UK.

http://agroecologygroup.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/Parliament-neonic-Goulson.pdf
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Wed Oct 16, 2013 11:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs13592-013-0199-4

If that is true, there are lots of implications.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
biobee
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 1055
Location: UK, England, S. Devon

PostPosted: Wed Oct 16, 2013 2:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shocked
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2013 8:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs13592-013-0199-4

Sublethal doses of imidacloprid decreased size of hypopharyngeal glands and respiratory rythm of honeybees in vivo

In order to create warmth carbohydrates and oxygen are needed. Thus a disorder of the respiration means a disorder of the heat balance of the Bien. What are the consequences?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Che Guebuddha
Golden Bee


Joined: 31 Jan 2012
Posts: 1549
Location: Hårlev, Stevns Kommune, Denmark

PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2013 8:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Winter loss?

F.....n pesticides! Big time to fight back this ignorant system we live in!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Garret
Golden Bee


Joined: 04 Apr 2009
Posts: 1681
Location: Canada, BC, Delta

PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2013 11:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Presentation at the 2013 American Beekeeping Federation by Dr Jim Frazier of Penn State:
We are focusing on synergistic and sublethal effects of multiple pesticides on the chemical senses and chemically mediated behaviors of honeybees in relation to honeybee health and CCD in collaboration with Chris Mullin and Maryann Frazier. Graduate student Daniel Schmehl is also looking at a comparative approach with the solitary bee, Osmia cornifrons.

http://abfnet.org/associations/10537/files/Dr.%20Jim%20Frazier.mp3
_________________
I'm not as serious as I look!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Fri May 09, 2014 8:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sublethal poisoning and wintering failures:

http://www.bulletinofinsectology.org/pdfarticles/vol67-2014-125-130lu.pdf
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Fri Mar 27, 2015 12:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This study went over three years:

Quote:
Diseases and pest species did not affect colony health but infestations of Varroa mites were significantly higher in exposed colonies. Honey stores indicated that exposed colonies may have avoided the contaminated food. Imidacloprid dose effects was delayed later in the summer, when colonies exposed to 20 and 100 μg/kg experienced higher rates of queen failure and broodless periods, which led to weaker colonies going into the winter. Pooled over two years, winter survival of colonies averaged 85.7, 72.4, 61.2 and 59.2% in the control, 5, 20 and 100 μg/kg treatment groups, respectively. Analysis of colony survival data showed a significant dose effect, and all contrast tests comparing survival between control and treatment groups were significant, except for colonies exposed to 5 μg/kg.

from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0118748

Assessment of Chronic Sublethal Effects of Imidacloprid on Honey Bee Colony Health
Galen P. Dively1*, Michael S. Embrey1, Alaa Kamel2, David J. Hawthorne1, Jeffery
S. Pettis3
published 18.3.2015

Complete study as PDF-download: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article/asset?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0118748.PDF
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2015 9:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

On a German beekeeper and scientist convention the following has been presented. Some studies on neonics and varroa. Findings:


  • Insecticides affect the population dynamics of mites!
  • Insecticides cause stress!
  • Significant effects in the fall if varroa + pesticides
  • varroa load is higher in the A and B group (which was fed with sublethal doses of neonics
  • Feeding of neonicotinoids leads to the reduction of hemocytes.
  • Neonics affect wound closure (wound may not heal well).
  • For thiacloprid this effect occurs only after high doses. For Clothianidin the effects occur after low doses


Original document (in German)
http://imker.cwsurf.de/index.php/downloads/category/3-dokumente?download=5:tagung
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Che Guebuddha
Golden Bee


Joined: 31 Jan 2012
Posts: 1549
Location: Hårlev, Stevns Kommune, Denmark

PostPosted: Sat Apr 11, 2015 6:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

How does it effect the varroa population? I wonder if varroa gets more virulent thanks to the pesticides?

There is so much proof that pesticides and mono crop agriculture are causing bee decline yet our overpaid politicians do nothing!

In Denmark they will by 2020 protect 20.000 hectares but I doubt they will do so in my locality.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2016 5:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/contentone/resinf/opm/2016/00000027/00000002/art00010?crawler=true&mimetype=application/pdf

Impacts of the Eu Neonicotinoids Restriction: A Case Study from the Czech Republic
Erik Tihelka
Outlooks on Pest Management, Volume 27,*Number 2, April 2016, pp. 84-87(4)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
catchercradle
Golden Bee


Joined: 31 May 2010
Posts: 1495
Location: Cambridge, UK

PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2016 2:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here in UK Che, politicians are worse than doing nothing but have given farmers a derogation allowing them to use neonics on Oil Seed Rape despite record harvests last year when they were not allowed to use it!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
AndyC
Scout Bee


Joined: 04 Jul 2014
Posts: 304
Location: Uk/Horsham/RH13

PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2016 7:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The fact is here in the UK. government is in the pockets of big business and agri chemical profits are HUGE, so they will always do what they are told by the money men who own those businesses.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> Environmental issues, GM, pesticides and campaigning All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

SPECIAL OFFER FOR UK FORUM MEMBERS - Buy your protective clothing here and get a special 15% discount! (use the code BAREFOOTBEEKEEPER at checkout and be sure to 'update basket')



Are the big energy companies bleeding you dry?


Is way too much of your hard-earned family income going up in smoke?

Are you worried about what could happen if the ageing grid system fails?

You need to watch this short video NOW to find out how YOU can cut your energy bills TO THE BONE within 30 days!

WATCH THE VIDEO NOW



(country selected automatically - UK/USA/CA/AU)

Conserving wild bees

Research suggests that bumble bee boxes have a very low success rate in actually attracting bees into them. We find that if you create an environment where first of all you can attract mice inside, such as a pile of stones, a drystone wall, paving slabs with intentionally made cavities underneath, this will increase the success rate.

Most bumble bee species need a dry space about the size a football, with a narrow entrance tunnel approximately 2cm in diameter and 20 cm long. Most species nest underground along the base of a linear feature such as a hedge or wall. Sites need to be sheltered and out of direct sunlight.

There is a spectacular display of wild bee hotels here

More about bumblebees and solitary bees here

Information about the Tree Bumblebee (Bombus hypnorum)

Barefoot Beekeeper Podcast



Now available from Lulu.com


Now available from Lulu.com


Now available from Lulu.com


4th Edition paperback now available from Lulu.com

See beekeeping books for details and links to ebook versions.
site map
php. BB © 2001, 2005 php. BB Group

View topic - Varroa out of control - what pesticides got to do with it - Natural Beekeeping Network Forum