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Study: Abscisic acid enhances the immune response

 
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 3:52 pm    Post subject: Study: Abscisic acid enhances the immune response Reply with quote

Abscisic acid enhances the immune response in Apis mellifera and contributes to the colony fitness
Pedro Negri, Matias D. Maggi, Leonor Ramirez, Leonardo De Feudis, Nicolás Szwarski, Silvina Quintana, Marin J. Eguaras, Lorenzo Lamattina
Apidologie, January 2015
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13592-014-0345-7

Abstract
The primary food of adult honey bees (Apis mellifera) is honey prepared by bees from nectar, provided by plants in order to stimulate the bee’s pollination service. Nectar consists of carbohydrates, amino acids and water, as well as other minor compounds whose proportion varies among plant species and whose biological implications in the honey bee physiology require intense research. Several environmental stressors are causing the decline of bee colonies, and thereby, we tried to connect the nutritional quality of bee’s diet with the strength of the bee’s immune system. The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) is present in nectar, honey and adult honey bees. It has been demonstrated that ABA stimulates innate immune defences in animal cells. However, the influence of ABA on A. mellifera’s health and fitness is unknown. Here, we show that honey bees fed with an ABA supplement in field experiments resulted in (i) the appearance of ABA in larvae and adult bees, (ii) enhanced haemocyte response to non-self recognition, (iii) improved wound healing and granulocyte and plasmatocyte activation and (iv) maximum adult bee population after the winter and increased pesticide tolerance. The results indicate that the naturally occurring compound ABA has a positive influence in honey bee immunity. ABA emerges as a potent booster of immune defence in A. mellifera and may be useful in addressing the colony losses threatening apiculture and pollination service worldwide.

=> One source for natural abscisic acid is maple sirup
http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/obj/s4/f2/dsk3/QQLA/TC-QQLA-21571.pdf
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Che Guebuddha
Golden Bee


Joined: 31 Jan 2012
Posts: 1549
Location: Hårlev, Stevns Kommune, Denmark

PostPosted: Tue Jan 27, 2015 1:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
ABA emerges as a potent booster of immune defence in A. mellifera and may be useful in addressing the colony losses threatening apiculture and pollination service worldwide.


I just dont like how this sounds! Each time there is a research its primary focus is how to save the "business as usual" concept of agriculture. So my guess is they will try to develop some magic potion called ABA Immunity against pesticides and this means pesticides can still be used as usual even though other pollinators are dying like Bumblebees, solitary bees, syrphid flies, butterflies, etc .... Im not buying this way of approaching the issue! Mono-crop agriculture MUST GO AWAY! Full STOP.

When it comes to immune strengthening I like to think of ALL the pollinators involved and we know today that forests and forest ground offer all sorts of goodies for the insects and so do wild meadows. The only way forward is Biodiversity and all this corrupted science can go to hell! Yes, Im slightly pi ss ed o ff

Bees are dying to tell us that something seriously is wrong with our human life style and not because we have to make them resistant to pesticides so we can go on killing the soil food web!
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Tue Jan 27, 2015 2:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That certainly would be the wrong message. Confused

But they don't give a ... anyway. So it might help to get the bees through what's coming upon us.

The age of industrial agriculture runs out anyway, since it is too costly in terms of energy. And the cheap&easy energy supply will end one day. Either way.

It is just a question how much damage is done to the soil and life web until then...
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AugustC
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Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Tue Jan 27, 2015 4:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You're definately reading something from that abstract that I am not seeing (unless you bought the whole article). This abstract says nothing more than another specific element of nectar/honey has been quantified that makes it a better food source for bees than sugar syrup.
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AugustC
Silver Bee


Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Tue Jan 27, 2015 5:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What is very interesting about this is that ABA is a plant stress hormone.
when soil water drops ABA increases
ABA causes bud domancy, leaf drop, seed domancy, reduced growth and closed stomata to save wate. It promotes root growth to find new water. BUT it does NOT reduce nectar production. So a conclusion you could draw from this research is that when the plants are under stress they have co-evolved a mechanism which not only keeps pollinators interested but promotes better health for them. So the plant selects for pollinators that prefer them by providing them a health benefit that pollinators that ignore them don't get.
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Barbara
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Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1574
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Wed Jan 28, 2015 10:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
You're definately reading something from that abstract that I am not seeing


Andy the bit that you must have overlooked is:-

Quote:
ABA emerges as a potent booster of immune defence in A. mellifera and may be useful in addressing the colony losses threatening apiculture and pollination service worldwide.

I can only see one way to read that and to me it's suggesting that giving synthesised ABA to migratory pollination colonies may prevent CCD.
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AugustC
Silver Bee


Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Wed Jan 28, 2015 10:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think you are confusing an author's opinion with a result.

The data is peer reviewed and scrutinised. The discussion is reviewed for relevance and traceability to results. The author's opinion of worth is not. They are entitled to have an opinion on what they produced. But if you familiarise yourself with the work so are you.

What is done with the information is up to those who come after. This data is available to anyone from any "camp" to compile and use to support or further their own knowledge and work.

This is not something to fuel anger and politics. It is something to fuel discussion and progress. Examine, Use, Challenge, and Improve.
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Wed Jan 28, 2015 10:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Whatever you make out of it. Very Happy

I give it a try and feed some maple sirup in bad times. See how it works. Got good results with nettle tea and like to add another tool to keep me bees alive.
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AugustC
Silver Bee


Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Wed Jan 28, 2015 10:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.usab-tm.ro/fileadmin/fzb/Simp%202010/vol1/FUNDAMENTAL_SCIENCES_IN_ANIMAL_HUSBANDRY/BIOCHHEMISTRY,BIOPHYSICS,MATHEMATICS/Marghitas.pdf

nettles are a good supplement if you choose to use one. Smile
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BBC
Scout Bee


Joined: 11 Jul 2012
Posts: 398
Location: Bicker, Lincolnshire, UK

PostPosted: Wed Jan 28, 2015 11:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

AugustC wrote:
What is very interesting about this is that ABA is a plant stress hormone.


... or even:

ABA is a compound present in the metabolic pathways of most higher plants and animals (including humans), which has been identified as being associated with several stress mechanisms in plants. It's role within animal physiology currently remains unclear, as little work has thus far been done in this area.
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