Please support Friends of the Bees to keep this forum free to use.

Natural Beekeeping International Forum
low-cost, low-impact, balanced beekeeping for everyone

 Forum FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileYour Profile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Please Read The Rules before posting.



(country selected automatically - UK/USA/CA/AU)
Sugar dusting with a solid bottom

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> Horizontal top bar hives
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
carlosdacosta
Nurse Bee


Joined: 27 Nov 2012
Posts: 49
Location: Burnaby, BC, Canada

PostPosted: Mon Feb 25, 2013 5:21 am    Post subject: Sugar dusting with a solid bottom Reply with quote

From the sticky FAQ - MANAGEMENT AND MANIPULATIONS OF TOP BAR HIVES:
Quote:
If the hives have a solid bottom board, a sticky card is laid onto the solid bottom board for the mites are to be counted.


I have built a couple of TBHs with solid bottoms. No bees yet, but getting a package in April. I'm researching how best to handle the dreaded varroa.

Can someone who's had experience with dusting with a bottom solid board TBH tell me what they used to make the sticky board "sticky"? I'm concerned that bees might stick to it since there is no screen to stop the bees from alighting onto the board.

Any other advice dealing with sugar dusting with a solid bottom is very welcome.

Thanks.

car/os
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
carlosdacosta
Nurse Bee


Joined: 27 Nov 2012
Posts: 49
Location: Burnaby, BC, Canada

PostPosted: Fri Mar 01, 2013 8:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

And while people are pondering my first post... (apparently there aren't very many Beeks with solid bottoms that monitor for varroa):

Would not the dusting fall on the sticky board and make it not sticky?

Carlos
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
AnthonyD
Silver Bee


Joined: 14 Aug 2011
Posts: 707
Location: County Kerry Ireland

PostPosted: Fri Mar 01, 2013 8:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think some people using conventional hives use vegetable oil on their varroa trays.

As for you're second post, perhaps you are answering your own question?

Why not go open mesh?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
carlosdacosta
Nurse Bee


Joined: 27 Nov 2012
Posts: 49
Location: Burnaby, BC, Canada

PostPosted: Sat Mar 02, 2013 4:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

AnthonyD wrote:
I think some people using conventional hives use vegetable oil on their varroa trays.

As for you're second post, perhaps you are answering your own question?

Why not go open mesh?


Hi. Thanks for replying.

1. So, to be clear, the vegetable oil is sticky enough for the varroa, but any bees wandering around the bottom are big enough to not get stuck?

2. I don't know. If I did answer my own question then it makes me wonder why make the board sticky in the first place? I suppose that the first few mites would get stuck but not the rest...

3. I have no practical experience in beekeeping, but I have read LOTS. There seem to be as many reasons to have solid bottoms as not. I went with solid primarily because it made the TBH simpler to build. In my area I'd have to have a solid bottom for the winter anyway.

There must be someone else with sold bottoms because the FAQ refers to it.

car/os
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
buffalobob
House Bee


Joined: 04 Apr 2014
Posts: 17
Location: US, Michigan, Detroit

PostPosted: Fri Apr 04, 2014 8:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The hive I built last year has a solid bottom with a landing area for the bees. As of last fall I had no mites. So this year I built 2 of the hives from the plan here with a screened bottom for a lady. She explained about the screen and mites and sticky bd. I also had to come up with a removable bottom so she could close it up in the winter. And as stated there so many reasons to use a screen or a closed bottom that for us novice beekeepers it is confusing. So now I'm thinking, start with the screened bottom then add a hinged/removable bottom about 1 inch below. The solid bottom would normally be closed but could be opened to add the sticky paper. And I guess if it got extremely hot it could be left open.
Any thoughts?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Kdxzoom
House Bee


Joined: 15 Jun 2012
Posts: 12
Location: USA, Yakima, WA

PostPosted: Sat Apr 05, 2014 2:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So I'm no expert, but I do have a solid bottom board. I slid a sticky board under my comb from one side and left it there for three days, pulled it out, counted the mites and divided by three to get the average 24 hour mite drop. This is the natural mite drop method. No sugar involved. If you "treat" your bees with a powdered sugar coating I guess you would not use the board at that time. Maybe before and afterwards to count natural mite drop.

My board has an 1/8 screen on it so the bees can walk on it and not get stuck, but the mites fall through and get stuck. I bought mine at Mann Lake, but would be easy to make with vegetable oil and a screen.

Jennifer
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1582
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Sat Apr 05, 2014 12:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have solid floors in my framed hives and don't monitor mite drop and never have. I make a judgement on treatment based on what I see during inspections and at the entrance. For the past 5 years I have not needed to treat. My top bar hives have a mixture of floors including solid, partial mesh and deep litter.

You might want to consider the deep litter floor for your new TBH instead of mesh or solid. Phil came up with the idea to simulate the environment of debris and insects that would be found in the bottom of a hollow tree that had been colonised by bees, creating a whole eco system rather than just a home for bees. There are potential benefits of the insects below (woodlice and earwigs etc) cleaning up the debris dropped by the bees above, perhaps including varroa mites. The litter should also better regulate the humidity in the hive by absorbing and releasing moisture. If you search "deep litter floor" using the forum search facility at the top
of the page where the "log in" and "message" buttons are, you should find all the info you need.

Regards

Barbara
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> Horizontal top bar hives All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

SPECIAL OFFER FOR UK FORUM MEMBERS - Buy your protective clothing here and get a special 15% discount! (use the code BAREFOOTBEEKEEPER at checkout and be sure to 'update basket')



Are the big energy companies bleeding you dry?


Is way too much of your hard-earned family income going up in smoke?

Are you worried about what could happen if the ageing grid system fails?

You need to watch this short video NOW to find out how YOU can cut your energy bills TO THE BONE within 30 days!

WATCH THE VIDEO NOW



(country selected automatically - UK/USA/CA/AU)

Conserving wild bees

Research suggests that bumble bee boxes have a very low success rate in actually attracting bees into them. We find that if you create an environment where first of all you can attract mice inside, such as a pile of stones, a drystone wall, paving slabs with intentionally made cavities underneath, this will increase the success rate.

Most bumble bee species need a dry space about the size a football, with a narrow entrance tunnel approximately 2cm in diameter and 20 cm long. Most species nest underground along the base of a linear feature such as a hedge or wall. Sites need to be sheltered and out of direct sunlight.

There is a spectacular display of wild bee hotels here

More about bumblebees and solitary bees here

Information about the Tree Bumblebee (Bombus hypnorum)

Barefoot Beekeeper Podcast



Now available from Lulu.com


Now available from Lulu.com


Now available from Lulu.com


4th Edition paperback now available from Lulu.com

See beekeeping books for details and links to ebook versions.
site map
php. BB © 2001, 2005 php. BB Group

View topic - Sugar dusting with a solid bottom - Natural Beekeeping Network Forum