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Making my TBH roof frame

 
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stingerD
New Bee


Joined: 15 May 2013
Posts: 1
Location: UK, North Devon

PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2013 7:32 pm    Post subject: Making my TBH roof frame Reply with quote

Hello,

I've just made the roof frame for my first ever TBH to Phil's brill instructions. However, I'm a tad confused about the fit of the roof frame. It sits nicely on the top of the legs but on the long edge there is a sizable gap between the top of the angled hive body and the roof frame. Having read a few posts it seems that this is ok and indeed will help with condensation due to increased ventilation...all good so far methinks.

What has confused me though is reading through some posts to find suggestions for gaps between top bars. This would allow bees out into the roof cavity and by extension they could then leave by this gable-gap that I just described. What am I missing?! Any thoughts gratefully received.[/img]
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jumbleoak
Scout Bee


Joined: 03 Aug 2010
Posts: 295
Location: UK, England, Kent

PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2013 7:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

No gaps between top bars. They are the real 'roof' of the hive. The frame thing is just weather-proofing.

Repeat: No gaps between top bars.
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buffalobob
House Bee


Joined: 04 Apr 2014
Posts: 17
Location: US, Michigan, Detroit

PostPosted: Fri Apr 04, 2014 7:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just finished building 2 hives from the plan available on this site. I noticed on the cut list that the width dimension for the roof seemed way to big. The ends of the hive are 18 inches wide so I made the width of the roof frame to have a clear width of 18 1/4 inches. The top bars are 17" so there would be a gap of 1/2 inch or so on each side for ventilation. I built a gable roof and added a ridge vent. I did build a different hive last year, similar in basic shape but with a flat roof. There was still clearance between the ends of the top bars and the inside of the flat roof and also a 3/4" space above the top bars. I had no problems with anything moving into that space other a couple of spiders.
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CeeBee
Foraging Bee


Joined: 16 Jun 2013
Posts: 104
Location: UK, Cambridge, Milton

PostPosted: Sat Apr 05, 2014 6:41 pm    Post subject: Re: Making my TBH roof frame Reply with quote

stingerD wrote:
...What has confused me though is reading through some posts to find suggestions for gaps between top bars...


As the others say, normally no gaps. What posts have you been reading? Beekeepers using National and other framed hives call the top bit of the frame a "Top bar", and of course there are gaps as it is the only way for bees to make their way into a "Super".

I've only read about gaps in TBH top bars in special cases like to fit some kind of feeder above the gap (which of course closes it off).

My hives aren't quite Phil's design, but I'd try to ensure that the roof or its frame doesn't tend to hit the top bars when you are putting the roof in place - if it does, there's a danger of moving the top bars without realising, perhaps inadvertently creating gaps. And it's as well if your top bars can't move (along their length) enough so that one end falls into the hive - the roof frame (at least on mine) prevents this).
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biobee
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 1051
Location: UK, England, S. Devon

PostPosted: Sat Apr 05, 2014 11:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The main reason for gaps either side between the ends of the bars and the roof supports is the avoidance of collision between these surfaces when the roof is removed and replaced.

The roof should overhang at the ends and at the sides for shade and rain protection.
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rmcpb
Scout Bee


Joined: 17 Jul 2011
Posts: 447
Location: Blue Mountains, NSW, Australia

PostPosted: Sun Apr 06, 2014 8:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The gap you may have heard about in a top bar is when the bars are set back a bit so there is a gap the bees can use as a top entrance.

Some people do super them, especially if their hive is a bit small, so they need a gap. Others use a gap to allow feeders but these are exceptions to the rule rather than the norm.

Cheers
Rob.
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