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Good news - Bad news

 
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AugustC
Silver Bee


Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2014 10:38 am    Post subject: Good news - Bad news Reply with quote

Hi All

The good news but:
I can report that my bees have made it through the winter and are bringing in pollen *cheer*.

The bad news but:
The guy who let me put the bees on his land in august has changed his mind and wants them off so he can turn the land over to live stock *boooo*.

So now I have to find somewhere else to put the hive and move a large hive full of bees who probably won't listen to my explanations from why this is necessary. Assuming I find somewhere to put the hives it will likely be nearby so I wanted to check this is essentially what I am looking at.

1. Wait until bee bedtime.
2. Block entrance (ensuring they still have air).
3. Move as gently as possible (not sure how) to new location.
4. Remove entrance block and stuff some grass into the grass to promote reorientation.
5. Put a bait hive at old location to collect any wayward foragers for ??? days after move, and put them back into the main hive by ???.

Advice wanted and accepted, thanks.
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biobee
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 1051
Location: UK, England, S. Devon

PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2014 10:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Assuming you will be moving more than a quarter mile (in which case, carrying it may be an option, with a friend...) use a low-loader/flat-bed trailer (that's the British meaning of trailer; not a mobile home - for the benefit of our American friends!) and drive very slowly...

If you move it more than a couple of miles, you shouldn't get any strays back to the original position, but collect them after a day or they won't survive.

Good luck!
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Adam Rose
Silver Bee


Joined: 09 Oct 2011
Posts: 582
Location: Manchester, UK

PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2014 11:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would do it quickly while it's still cold. Maybe in the late afternoon or on a rainy day when they're not flying at all. The bees will hardly notice at this time of year.

Then I don't think you will need to bother with anything at the old location, nor with blocking the entrance with grass. You may lose one or two that are intrepid enough to fly back to the old location but it's not like there are thousands of foragers out at this time of year.

I had to do an emergency move in January along these lines. All I used to block the entrance was some foam from a sponge bought from a garage for the ten minute car journey.

If you're moving the hive in a car, I would place the hive as diagonally as I could get it so neither vertical nor horizontal rocking will break the combs. If the hive is currently on legs and you will need to remove these to get it in a car, then at this time of year you could do that one sunny morning before the bees have woken up and then you will be ready for a quick move whenever you want to do it.

One little mistake I made was not to thoroughly block the "unofficial" entrances apart from the main one. It didn't bother me that much but my non-beekeeper son was a bit freaked out when bees started flying out as we lifted the hive and put it into the car. Again, I just ripped up bits of sponge and stuffed them into the unofficial holes. Maybe having some masking tape or similar handy would do just as well.
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AugustC
Silver Bee


Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2014 1:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks folks. I think I might perhaps have found somewhere for them to go but have to wait to hear back from the landowner. As the crow (or in this case bee) flies it is only a couple of hundred yards. However the original hive site has poor vechile access and even if I get my van over there the field is very uneven make it a bit of a rollercoaster for the bees.
Trying to decide whether it would be best to get someone to help me just carry the hive the 1/2 mile ish. Screwing some long bars to the legs and carry it like a litter , or risk the van.
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biobee
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 1051
Location: UK, England, S. Devon

PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2014 1:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

AugustC wrote:

Trying to decide whether it would be best to get someone to help me just carry the hive the 1/2 mile ish. Screwing some long bars to the legs and carry it like a litter , or risk the van.


Carry it, if at all possible, is my advice. The bees will have a more comfortable journey - as long as you don't drop it!
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AugustC
Silver Bee


Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2014 1:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hang on! So...don't! drop the big box bursting with bees? Got it Smile

Wish me luck, thanks for the advice
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stevecook172001
Site Admin


Joined: 19 Jul 2013
Posts: 443
Location: Loftus, Cleveland

PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2014 6:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't live too far from you and I've got an 8' by 4' builder's trailer if you need them transporting AugustC. It might be a bit of a hard ride for them. but, I could drive very slowly and we could maybe pad underneath the hive with blankets etc. Let me know. alternatively, if they could fit in the back of my large Astra estate car with the back seats down, I could do that as well.

Actually I've just re-read your last post and now see it is only half a mile or so. That being the case, if you need someone to help carry it give me a shout.
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biobee
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 1051
Location: UK, England, S. Devon

PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2014 6:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There you go - job done! Glad to see this place providing a good service.
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J Smith
Foraging Bee


Joined: 13 Jan 2014
Posts: 169
Location: New Zealand, South Island, Southland, Riversdale.

PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2014 7:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good on you Steve. Wink
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AugustC
Silver Bee


Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2014 9:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you Steve that is very kind of you. I have managed to recruit the help of my neighbour, but may give you a call if he backs out. Otherwise I'll let you know how it goes.
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ringtor
House Bee


Joined: 07 Jun 2009
Posts: 13
Location: UK, Devon

PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2014 5:42 pm    Post subject: moving bees Reply with quote

Try putting a layer of foam or an old mattress under the hive. Strap down well!
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AugustC
Silver Bee


Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2014 9:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The deed is done! Hive moved, bait box in place of old hive.
Should I check the bait hive every night or just leave it til friday?
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trekmate
Golden Bee


Joined: 30 Nov 2009
Posts: 1123
Location: UK, North Yorkshire, Bentham

PostPosted: Wed Mar 05, 2014 7:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'd check every night as there may not be enough bees to survive a cold night.
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Adam Rose
Silver Bee


Joined: 09 Oct 2011
Posts: 582
Location: Manchester, UK

PostPosted: Wed Mar 05, 2014 8:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

trekmate wrote:
I'd check every night as there may not be enough bees to survive a cold night.


Do you think many will go back to the old location at this time of year ? I would be interested to hear what happens.
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trekmate
Golden Bee


Joined: 30 Nov 2009
Posts: 1123
Location: UK, North Yorkshire, Bentham

PostPosted: Wed Mar 05, 2014 1:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Adam

I'd think it depends on weather, especially temperature. Once they are out in forage mode their sat-nav takes over! Laughing

John
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AugustC
Silver Bee


Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Wed Mar 05, 2014 8:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well I have been over to the old hive site and the answer is........*drum roll* .. not a single bee.

I checked the hive and it looked as though some of the grass had been moved but hard to say. They were flying well at the weekend but I can't check in the week as I'm at work. For all I know something as moved in the hive and blocked the entrance or they just weren't flying today. I have recruited my wife to go and check tomorrow. Otherwise, weather permitting, I will check on them at the weekend.
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trekmate
Golden Bee


Joined: 30 Nov 2009
Posts: 1123
Location: UK, North Yorkshire, Bentham

PostPosted: Wed Mar 05, 2014 10:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If they're not flying, put your ear against the hive and give it a sharp rap (like knocking on a door). The bees should reply with a loud buzz that should end quickly. A slow, drawn out end to the buzz implies no queen.

For the cost of a few pounds a cheap stethoscope from e-bay means you don't need to knock, but can hear the bees hum. Smile
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AugustC
Silver Bee


Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Mon Mar 10, 2014 9:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well they certainly seem ok to me. I still can't believe none of them went back to the old site. I may well have lucked out with a couple of days of dull weather.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pFXVCJ0iwDU

Just as a follow up to the video when I did try to go in and replace the topbars as soon as I moved a follower board the bees got a little ...eh... defensive. One actually stung me through me suit. I took this as a sign that they wanted some alone time and decided to deal with the comb another day. Since they were so active and I am away for a week now I added a few top bars and beat a hasty retreat. Well they say moving house is the second most stressful thing you can do. My bees seem to agree.
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