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Warré To TBH move

 
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Invision
Guard Bee


Joined: 11 Jul 2013
Posts: 71
Location: Poulsbo, Washington USA zone 8b

PostPosted: Tue Mar 11, 2014 9:06 pm    Post subject: Warré To TBH move Reply with quote

Is it too early to do this?

I will be attaching the combs from the Warré Hive to the top bars of the HTBH but just wondered if it is too early to attempt this.

I have 3 days of 60 degree weather and would like to do this. I have some honey to feed them also.
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madasafish
Silver Bee


Joined: 29 Apr 2009
Posts: 880
Location: Stoke On Trent

PostPosted: Wed Mar 12, 2014 7:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I found the combs of the warre hive had to be cropped to fit.
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biobee
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 1055
Location: UK, England, S. Devon

PostPosted: Wed Mar 12, 2014 12:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you can do it fairly quickly you should be OK, but there is a chance of chilling brood.
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Invision
Guard Bee


Joined: 11 Jul 2013
Posts: 71
Location: Poulsbo, Washington USA zone 8b

PostPosted: Wed Mar 12, 2014 2:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, I will have to crop the ends about 2 inches but once I get the queen in the box I should be able to shake the rest off and into the box.

I was just concerned that the new box wouldn't be varnished with Propolis and would be new, that they might not like it. But I guess we will see, I'll leave work early today to start it. Smile
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biobee
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 1055
Location: UK, England, S. Devon

PostPosted: Wed Mar 12, 2014 4:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You could varnish the insides with shellac.

See here - http://www.biobees.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=11035&start=0&postdays=0&postorder=asc&highlight=
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Invision
Guard Bee


Joined: 11 Jul 2013
Posts: 71
Location: Poulsbo, Washington USA zone 8b

PostPosted: Wed Mar 12, 2014 6:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would like to do something similar to this but I just don't have time for that to dry enough I think. I am hoping to be able to transfer all these girls in less than 10 minutes. from the time I get home. I am going with a solid floor though. My next Top Bar will have the Eco floor. then this winter will be the difference maker.

About that post you linked, I have noticed that during January and February, I had some high Varroa counts. Since march there has been zero. We have had almost 5 days where it just rained.... and Rained.... and has been no less that 85% Humidity, so I think something with what you guys found is true. might experiment with a reptile fogger I have on a small hive to keep humidity at 80% and see what happens.
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biobee
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 1055
Location: UK, England, S. Devon

PostPosted: Wed Mar 12, 2014 7:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes - humidity and propolis vapour and who know what else: hive atmosphere is vital to bee health.

BTW - shellac varnish dries in a few minutes.
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Invision
Guard Bee


Joined: 11 Jul 2013
Posts: 71
Location: Poulsbo, Washington USA zone 8b

PostPosted: Wed Mar 12, 2014 8:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do I cut it with anything to make it faster? like Alcohol or something?
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J Smith
Foraging Bee


Joined: 13 Jan 2014
Posts: 169
Location: New Zealand, South Island, Southland, Riversdale.

PostPosted: Wed Mar 12, 2014 8:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shellac varnish uses methylated spirits or denatured alcohol as the wetting agent that allows the product to be brushed on, evaporation of the spirit leaves the solids behind and forms the protective/sealing coat of "varnish". Thus it is easily applied and quick drying, but not as hard wearing as a turpentine based polyurethane or the like.
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Invision
Guard Bee


Joined: 11 Jul 2013
Posts: 71
Location: Poulsbo, Washington USA zone 8b

PostPosted: Wed Mar 12, 2014 8:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alright, I'll give it a go, can't hurt anything I guess.
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Invision
Guard Bee


Joined: 11 Jul 2013
Posts: 71
Location: Poulsbo, Washington USA zone 8b

PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2014 1:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well that went pretty well, I think I may have lost some forgers but hopefully they will find there way home (I did shake them into the hive as they landed on the old entrance), they stayed the night in the next door Warré hive.

All I had to do was free the sides, place my top bars on the Warré bars and screw them into each other and lift away (Figured this would be the least invasive to the girls). I did however have to cut to fit each bar but it was only a 3 by 2 triangle. Had to cut through some of the brood area because they decided to have the brood nest on the south facing wall of the hive...

All in all I think it went good, I did spot the queen and SHE WAS MASSIVE. I've never seen one that big. Very light in color, I found that odd seeing as how I have Carny's and her other sister is Solid black. But maybe she mated with some Italian Drones? I dunno, but Varnish worked pretty good (Thanks peeps). They seem fine and I didn't even get stung (wasn't wearing and gear, did have a smoker but that was for in case they got edgy).

One more question, how long before I should go in and check on them? I was going to through a pollen patty in there. I already placed a quart Jar full of Honey (from a die-out).


Last edited by Invision on Thu Mar 13, 2014 2:16 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Invision
Guard Bee


Joined: 11 Jul 2013
Posts: 71
Location: Poulsbo, Washington USA zone 8b

PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2014 1:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Should I shake some nurse bees from my other Really strong hive in there or do you think that could be a disaster?
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