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Vespa velutina (Japanese Hornet) Prevention - Europe

 
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EricConcE
Nurse Bee


Joined: 12 Mar 2014
Posts: 31
Location: Aveiro, Portugal

PostPosted: Wed Mar 12, 2014 1:17 am    Post subject: Vespa velutina (Japanese Hornet) Prevention - Europe Reply with quote

Hello all!
I am establishing quite a few hives in central Portugal within the next couple months, but am aware that the Vespa velutina invasion is already in the north of the country. I was wondering if anybody had experience dealing with these invaders, along with effective means of dealing with them. (I have been considering a mod similar to the periscope cover). Thanks!
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catchercradle
Golden Bee


Joined: 31 May 2010
Posts: 1487
Location: Cambridge, UK

PostPosted: Wed Mar 12, 2014 8:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Eric and welcome to the forum.
If you could add the nearest large town to your location information it will do two things.
1. You will be able to get better information on this and other questions you may ask in the future.
2. It will stop you getting removed as part of the spam prevention that is going on. This has sadly become necessary recently.

On to your question.

In France many are using spring trapping of queens as a means of control.
Another possibility is the waspinator. This is something that is supposed to look like a wasps nest and it is claimed that it stops other wasps nests being built nearbyas well ask keeping wasps away. A non bee keeping friend is a fervent believer in it but I haven't tried it myself.
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EricConcE
Nurse Bee


Joined: 12 Mar 2014
Posts: 31
Location: Aveiro, Portugal

PostPosted: Wed Mar 12, 2014 7:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the info/advice. The waspinator sounds really interesting- I'm going to do some research on it. If anyone wants to chime in on personal experience that would be very useful as well.
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Manuel Robert
Guard Bee


Joined: 04 Dec 2011
Posts: 73
Location: Bischofsheim, Rhön , Germany

PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2014 10:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

We don´t have them here yet, but in case I´d consider periscope entrances with 5-6mm slits ( underneath ) where the bees fit through but not the hornets.
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Che Guebuddha
Golden Bee


Joined: 31 Jan 2012
Posts: 1549
Location: Hårlev, Stevns Kommune, Denmark

PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2014 1:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Japanese bees have developed a tactic to lure the scout wasp/hornet into the hive and then create a cluster around it, raising temperature of the cluster to 41-42'C which kills the scout hornet.

European bees do the same in Denmark/Sweden with the european wasp/hornet (im sure in other countries too).

If we manipulate the entrance our bees will never adapt to this new threat. Its same with Varroa; we fight it all the time instead of letting bees and varroa coadapt. Im sure bees have the ability to sort this threat out. They survived over 40 million years on this planet for a reason.

I will be dealing with this as Im dealing with Varroa Smile hands off approach and respecting the colonies bio-rythm. One thing I will be doing is breed for a low level aggression in my apiary which is on a safe distance from any passers by. I feel that certain level of agression is of benefit to the bees. Time will tell.
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catchercradle
Golden Bee


Joined: 31 May 2010
Posts: 1487
Location: Cambridge, UK

PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2014 5:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
If we manipulate the entrance our bees will never adapt to this new threat. Its same with Varroa; we fight it all the time instead of letting bees and varroa coadapt. Im sure bees have the ability to sort this threat out. They survived over 40 million years on this planet for a reason.


And the bees have more chance of adapting to the hornet because like the bees it is on an annual breeding cycle, unlike the varroa which has several life cycles over the year, potentially allowing it to adapt faster than the bees can.
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stevecook172001
Site Admin


Joined: 19 Jul 2013
Posts: 443
Location: Loftus, Cleveland

PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2014 7:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Even then, though, if the varoa fully out-competes the bees, it ends up with no hosts and its population crashes. The only varoa strain, in the end, that survives into the future, is the strain which does not out-compete it's host.

It's why the most common human virus is the common cold, whereas the deadliest human viruses also tend to be the rarest.

If, on the other hand, we see off the deadliest bee pathogens, like varoa, with chemical treatments of one form or another, all this leads to is ever more deadly strains of those pathogens evolving to cope with the treatments and ever weaker bees that need the treatments merely to survive.

It's also why we now have human super bugs resistant to all known antibiotics.

It's madness. We're not God existing independently of the rest of life. We are a part of life. We just need to learn some damned humility.

Sorry....rant over.
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mirtilo
New Bee


Joined: 02 Jan 2014
Posts: 7
Location: Portugal - Braga

PostPosted: Wed Jun 04, 2014 3:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi!

someone from the north of Portugal here. A professional beekeeper I knew, said to me that the least of his worries is the asian wasp - compared to varroosis and other diseases. All he does is to carry a modified tenis raquet (with a thinner mesh) with him and whenever he sees a wasp hovering around one of his hives, he tries to thump it with the raquet... Not very orthodox, but that's what he does.

Last year I spotted a big nest of asian wasps at the Viana do Castelo region - I have immediately signaled to the fire fighters and a week later the nest had been scorched with a special blowtorch.

This year, I've already spotted some around my tbh in Braga, so the seem to be heading south...

Regards,
Miguel.
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Lacewing
Guard Bee


Joined: 08 Sep 2012
Posts: 96
Location: Powys, Mid Wales

PostPosted: Wed Jun 04, 2014 7:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello EricConcE...

I would definitely find out what your local beekeepers have discovered. Also those in France.

I'm afraid my only personal experience with the Waspinator, which I put up this spring ahead of arrival of wasp queens, after an autumn of wasp activity around the hives, was that Welsh wasp queens, at any rate, seem not to be fooled by it at all! I found two beautiful little goose egg-sized wasp nests starting inside the roofs of both hives which were not 2 metres from the Waspinator. In the autumn our local hornets also weren't affected by it, as they zoomed around occasionally, too, but I think it's supposed to work in the springtime really.
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