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Is treated lumber acceptable for the eco floor?

 
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msscha
Guard Bee


Joined: 29 Dec 2013
Posts: 59
Location: Newberry, FL, USA

PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2014 1:45 pm    Post subject: Is treated lumber acceptable for the eco floor? Reply with quote

Home Depot (big box DIY supplier) offered a lumber labeled "weathershield" -- no formeldahyde, but treated to resist weather. This seemed like a good choice for the eco-floor since it would be moist all the time, and pine degrades quickly in that environment. However, I read a statement yesterday that said the material should NOT be used in beehives. Given the bees will not come in contact with the wood, but the floor is still part of the hive, should I replace this?

This probably seems like a silly question at this point, and I'm lucky that the bees won't arrive for another few weeks. But I was going to finish the hive this weekend, and need to know if I should re-build the floor box. Thank you!
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Invision
Guard Bee


Joined: 11 Jul 2013
Posts: 71
Location: Poulsbo, Washington USA zone 8b

PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2014 2:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My Opinion, don't do it. Treated wood has some nasty chemicals that can travel through anything it comes into contact. I don't even recommend cutting it with out a mask or well ventilated area... Should only be used for exterior purposes. Try cedar or maybe some black locus, less oils in the locus, but good luck finding it Smile

Any soft wood will last you a long time before it needs to be replaced.
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Invision
Guard Bee


Joined: 11 Jul 2013
Posts: 71
Location: Poulsbo, Washington USA zone 8b

PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2014 2:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you are worried about he soft wood, just buy a can of Polyurethane coating from lowes/depot and coat the wood. That will make it last a lot longer. Or, as I have mentioned and I swear by, Cedar Seal works amazing for weather proofing, and it's safe and drys pretty quick.
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msscha
Guard Bee


Joined: 29 Dec 2013
Posts: 59
Location: Newberry, FL, USA

PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2014 2:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

@Invision -- thank you! That is pretty much what I'd decided, too, but wanted to double check b/c my husband groaned a bit about having to re-do the work Laughing. Will use some shellac to create a bit more protection, too.
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WileyHunter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 13 Jan 2014
Posts: 125
Location: Batesville, IN USA

PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2014 5:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My intention, for any lumber we need to use for the garden or beehive, is to use only un-treated wood. Even if that means I'll have to replace the wood every couple of years, as I expect with our raised bed SFG's sides which comes in contact with the dirt directly. Too much at stake IMO to risk family (or bees) health with chemicals.
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trekmate
Golden Bee


Joined: 30 Nov 2009
Posts: 1123
Location: UK, North Yorkshire, Bentham

PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2014 6:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why not line the eco-floor sides with pond liner or similar? It will prevent the wood from getting damp.
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J Smith
Foraging Bee


Joined: 13 Jan 2014
Posts: 169
Location: New Zealand, South Island, Southland, Riversdale.

PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2014 8:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Personally I would try to avoid treated timber if possible, especially older recycled tanalised timber- some of that stuff was treated with CCA (Copper Chromium Arsenic!)
There are some "safe" timber treatments out there, but just how safe is still up for debate when it comes to bee hives (in my opinion).
As others have pointed out, try to find a timber that has natural defence against exterior application. Those used for natural fencing, fence posts, building sidings, roof shingles and the like. Any of them will beat untreated Pine in such situations.

If your good man has already completed that part of the hive and used treated timber to do so, I would coat the inside walls of the eco floor with several layers of non toxic paint.
If you are still employing a mesh floor in your build, then you could cover the sides with some form of plastic sheeting, but if a solid floor you may trap moisture between the plastic and timber that may cause you problems down the track.
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msscha
Guard Bee


Joined: 29 Dec 2013
Posts: 59
Location: Newberry, FL, USA

PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 2014 4:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It wasn't as difficult as we'd though to re-do the eco-floor, though the idea of lining with pond lining was a good one! I'll add some shellac or polyurethane to the inside and the outside will get painted with exterior paint. It's very humid here and untreated pine rots quickly.
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