Please support Friends of the Bees to keep this forum free to use.

Natural Beekeeping International Forum
low-cost, low-impact, balanced beekeeping for everyone

 Forum FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileYour Profile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Please Read The Rules before posting.



(country selected automatically - UK/USA/CA/AU)
Having Trouble with my bees after I installed them

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> Horizontal top bar hives
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Uwe in USA
Guard Bee


Joined: 08 May 2013
Posts: 69
Location: Arlington, Virginia, USA

PostPosted: Fri Apr 18, 2014 1:37 pm    Post subject: Having Trouble with my bees after I installed them Reply with quote

I received my two packages of bees on Monday when it was about 20 celcius. looked all was fine. Then the next day it turned cold and rainy with some snow mix. over night it was around 0 celcius and ever since it has been below 10 celcius at night and around lower teens during the day. I can see some bees coming and going and building a comb but I don't see the food getting lesser. I have a bottom feeder which is behind a follower board. The bees are all in a clump on the floor probably denying access to the food. I am very concerned. does some one has some input?

Regards

Uwe
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Invision
Guard Bee


Joined: 11 Jul 2013
Posts: 71
Location: Poulsbo, Washington USA zone 8b

PostPosted: Fri Apr 18, 2014 2:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Might want to think up some sort of top feeder for the colder temps, as heat rises it will keep the syrup warmer allowing the bees to take it. I just had a jar feeder attached to my follower board and that seemed to work fine, but it was not freezing temps here, we are done with those. bees wont take liquid when it's below 50, I've found in my area. They are also still stocked up from the package feeder. You basically just caught a swarm and placed it in the hive, in a day or two they will have consumed that and will go for your feeder... In our area we don't get packages until the end of April because of the freak drops in temps. Mail order does not follow that rule, they are just trying to sell bees.

Just be patient and if you have a follower board just give them about 8 or 10 bars to start. Make sure you check to see if they are following your guides though after a week or your going to have a mess when your flow starts. I've since made a device that allows me to put a starter strip right down the center of my top bars. This way I am assured they are building where I want too, I don't even have curled ends like what happens in most.

Just don't bug the bees for a week, if it looks like your going to have bad weather for a while you may want to make a candy block and set in there so they can have something to eat. Or if you have a friend that has some raw honey that is not contaminated. (DON'T BUY STORE BOUGHT)

It also sounds like they don't care about the syrup and are finding nectar locally. Overall it sounds like they are being bees to me Smile.

What breed did the package say there were?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Uwe in USA
Guard Bee


Joined: 08 May 2013
Posts: 69
Location: Arlington, Virginia, USA

PostPosted: Fri Apr 18, 2014 2:39 pm    Post subject: My new bees Reply with quote

Thanks. They are Italian Honey Bees.
I also added a starter strip on the Top bars and smeared it with wax.
They have about 10 Topbars to start with. I do have raw honey and actually some pollen I bought. not contaminated. Bought it from the Amish around here.
I could give them that. I am just concerned with the dead bees laying on the floor. lots of them.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Invision
Guard Bee


Joined: 11 Jul 2013
Posts: 71
Location: Poulsbo, Washington USA zone 8b

PostPosted: Fri Apr 18, 2014 3:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well they are shook package so you are going to have all ages/stages of bees, also stress from the transportation can do that also. 3# package=close to 10000 bees. 50 to 60 dead bees is not a big deal, just wait till fall when the summer bees die... they pile up fast. As long as you have a good cluster hanging I wouldn't worry about it, once they have enough capped brood they will start removing dead bees. Italians are going to take more food, just make sure you keep them fed but don't worry if they don't take the feed, they know what they want. I personally wouldn't bother with the pollen, I tried to do that with my girls in early march and they could have cared less about it.

Try not to rotate your bars until they have capped brood. Otherwise you can risk the chance of micro fractures the bees can't find and fix, then you might have collapses. Fresh comb is EXTREMELY weak.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1567
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Fri Apr 18, 2014 4:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Uwe

I'm concerned when you say
Quote:
The bees are all in a clump on the floor


Do you mean there is a clump of dead bees on the floor or that the cluster is on the floor of the hive. If the latter, then it sounds like your queen cage fell and the queen is stuck inside. If this is the case you need to rectify that ASAP. The cluster sitting on the hive floor is not good. Heat rises, so they will be losing heat into the area above them and if your weather is cold at the moment that will cause problems. They may start trying to build comb upwards from the floor. Are both hives the same?
You say you can see a comb. Is it hanging from a bar in the middle of the cluster.
If the daytime temps are mid teens Celsius then I would expect them to take the syrup and my feeling is that they haven't found it yet or can't get to it.
I may have misunderstood you and I hope I have, but a clearer description of what is going on in each hive or photos would be helpful.

Regards

Barbara
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
Garret
Golden Bee


Joined: 04 Apr 2009
Posts: 1681
Location: Canada, BC, Delta

PostPosted: Sat Apr 19, 2014 3:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
The bees are all in a clump on the floor


This is not normal! They should be clustered from the roof. If the queen is in the cage on the floor hang it from one of the bars. Replace their syrup with very warm and place it in next to the cluster so they can easily find it.

Please explain in detail step by step how you installed them so that the members here can give good and rapid advice.
_________________
I'm not as serious as I look!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Uwe in USA
Guard Bee


Joined: 08 May 2013
Posts: 69
Location: Arlington, Virginia, USA

PostPosted: Mon Apr 21, 2014 5:30 pm    Post subject: Installed bees Reply with quote

I installed them as one beekeeper showed me from whom I received my very first package. He told me to lay it on the inside of the observation window so I can see when the queen is out and that would be the best way to do it. No need to hang it.
i was able to locate the cage and both queens are out now and they are all hanging on big cluster from the top and building comb.
Also I can see a lot of movement now since the weather is warmer and hopefully the cold is gone.
it was such a bad timing getting the bees on a 80 F day and then it dropped the next day to 40s and lower. Now constantly back in the 60s and 70s.
Look at the pics and see how busy they are flying. but they haven't touched the food much only half.


Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Manuel Robert
Guard Bee


Joined: 04 Dec 2011
Posts: 73
Location: Bischofsheim, Rhön , Germany

PostPosted: Tue Apr 22, 2014 7:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great it worked out. IMO it is better to hang the cage, at least in cold weather so the bees can cluster around it.
A construction hint : When using tongue and groove boards ( like your roofing ) it is better to have the groove on the lower side so that no water seeps into it and staying there, eventually causing rott.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Uwe in USA
Guard Bee


Joined: 08 May 2013
Posts: 69
Location: Arlington, Virginia, USA

PostPosted: Tue Apr 22, 2014 11:59 am    Post subject: Roof construction Reply with quote

Thanks, yes I was aware of that and therefore I put 4 coats of latex paint on plus I filled in all the holes with wood clue and or wood filler. then I put more coats on top.
So no water can stand in there. Its pretty resitant.

will se, maybe I will make a different roof fot the next bee hive. For n ow three in my backyard are fine.

Regards

Uwe
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Invision
Guard Bee


Joined: 11 Jul 2013
Posts: 71
Location: Poulsbo, Washington USA zone 8b

PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2014 2:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Also you can place a small bead of #1 silicone window & door from home depot or lowes. Fills gaps and can't see it.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> Horizontal top bar hives All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

SPECIAL OFFER FOR UK FORUM MEMBERS - Buy your protective clothing here and get a special 15% discount! (use the code BAREFOOTBEEKEEPER at checkout and be sure to 'update basket')



Are the big energy companies bleeding you dry?


Is way too much of your hard-earned family income going up in smoke?

Are you worried about what could happen if the ageing grid system fails?

You need to watch this short video NOW to find out how YOU can cut your energy bills TO THE BONE within 30 days!

WATCH THE VIDEO NOW



(country selected automatically - UK/USA/CA/AU)

Conserving wild bees

Research suggests that bumble bee boxes have a very low success rate in actually attracting bees into them. We find that if you create an environment where first of all you can attract mice inside, such as a pile of stones, a drystone wall, paving slabs with intentionally made cavities underneath, this will increase the success rate.

Most bumble bee species need a dry space about the size a football, with a narrow entrance tunnel approximately 2cm in diameter and 20 cm long. Most species nest underground along the base of a linear feature such as a hedge or wall. Sites need to be sheltered and out of direct sunlight.

There is a spectacular display of wild bee hotels here

More about bumblebees and solitary bees here

Information about the Tree Bumblebee (Bombus hypnorum)

Barefoot Beekeeper Podcast



Now available from Lulu.com


Now available from Lulu.com


Now available from Lulu.com


4th Edition paperback now available from Lulu.com

See beekeeping books for details and links to ebook versions.
site map
php. BB © 2001, 2005 php. BB Group

View topic - Having Trouble with my bees after I installed them - Natural Beekeeping Network Forum