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My first hive

 
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wuertele
House Bee


Joined: 29 Jan 2014
Posts: 11
Location: Menlo Park, CA

PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2014 8:10 pm    Post subject: My first hive Reply with quote

Last Saturday I got my first bees and installed them in a TBH I built myself. Here is a link to some photos:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/wuertele/sets/72157644247591773/

Glass sides with 100% view and closing insulated panels
Glass follower board
5' internal length
1-3/8" top bars with 20% angle
3mm SS mesh floor
All wood (except stand top surface) reclaimed from demoed redwood 2x4s
Silvered foam canopy with space for gallon feeders

Dave
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Invision
Guard Bee


Joined: 11 Jul 2013
Posts: 71
Location: Poulsbo, Washington USA zone 8b

PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2014 8:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looks pretty cool, just remember to put all the sides up when you want to mow the lawn Smile.

I hope you have some good insulator between the glass and the elements, glass transfers heat and cold really easy.

Any reason for not using wooden sides?

looks like it may have cost a little bit of money for this one Smile


Last edited by Invision on Wed Apr 23, 2014 8:38 pm; edited 1 time in total
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wuertele
House Bee


Joined: 29 Jan 2014
Posts: 11
Location: Menlo Park, CA

PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2014 8:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Invision wrote:
Any reason for not using wooden sides?

I thought about wood, but I couldn't figure out a way to make it see-through.

Dave
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Invision
Guard Bee


Joined: 11 Jul 2013
Posts: 71
Location: Poulsbo, Washington USA zone 8b

PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2014 8:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh,

well good thing is your never going to have to worry about the sides warping Smile going to be a lot of condensation in that one though. Might want to check for mold often.
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wuertele
House Bee


Joined: 29 Jan 2014
Posts: 11
Location: Menlo Park, CA

PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2014 8:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Invision wrote:
going to be a lot of condensation in that one though. Might want to check for mold often.

I have already noticed significant condensation. Since I have insulated panels closed all the time (except for when I peek), I expect the temperature of the glass to be similar to what it would be had I built the hive out of wood. The main difference here is that the glass is not porous, so no condensation will be absorbed. I think lack of absorption may actually reduce the incidence of mold. If there is enough condensation it will drain into the bottom section which I can choose to vent or not. The venting is stopped with foam right now, which is very porous, and the air here in N. California is pretty dry, so I am not too worried about mold.
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Houstonbees
Guard Bee


Joined: 25 Jul 2012
Posts: 81
Location: Houston Tx, USA

PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2014 11:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well....ummmm.......ugh......hmmmm......interesting.
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MikeRobinson
Foraging Bee


Joined: 01 Apr 2012
Posts: 200
Location: Upper Northwest Georgia, USA

PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2014 8:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Seems a bit odd to me, yes, "here in the steamy South," but ... what the hey, bees are sturdy and resilient. (After all, they manage to survive in glass-walled "demonstrator hives" in food-stores and beekeeper-shops and science-museums everywhere.) Wink

(And actually, in California, it's probably a very safe bet. Been there, too. Done that.)

Somehow, the Girls manage to find a way to put-up with our "bright ideas," regardless. Mmmmm....?

Enjoy your bees!!
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biobee
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 1051
Location: UK, England, S. Devon

PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2014 10:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes - this is exactly the same principle as varnishing the insides with propolis, to create a non-absorbent surface so condensation can drain away.

This was Ed Clarke's key finding, published in 1918 - http://www.biobees.com/library/general_beekeeping/beekeeping_books_articles/ConstructiveBeekeeping_EdClarke.pdf
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Dexter's shed
Scout Bee


Joined: 16 May 2014
Posts: 307
Location: Grays, Essex, UK

PostPosted: Tue May 20, 2014 9:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

that's truly a work of art, I'm presuming you work in the glass industry,
my only advice would have been wax starter strips in those top bars, but will be good to see pictures/video in a month or two time
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