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Natural Beekeeping in Chelmsford, Essex

 
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Stephen
New Bee


Joined: 24 Feb 2014
Posts: 7
Location: Chelmsford, Essex

PostPosted: Mon Apr 28, 2014 9:59 pm    Post subject: Natural Beekeeping in Chelmsford, Essex Reply with quote

I'm interested in forming a natural beekeeping group using TBHs in Chelmsford in Essex.

I have some land away from developed areas with nearby storage which has potential to be an apiary, and I have a workshop in which I'm currently constructing Warre hives. I would be happy to share both with likeminded people who want to follow the low intervention, apicentric approach, gaining experience as we go.

Anyone interested can pm me or reply in this thread. Thanks.
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catchercradle
Golden Bee


Joined: 31 May 2010
Posts: 1492
Location: Cambridge, UK

PostPosted: Tue Apr 29, 2014 6:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Don't have his contact details to hand but Spencer at Lauriesten Farm on the Blackwater estuary isn't too far from you. He has if I remember Warrés and a sun hive or two. He has also done workshops.
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Stephen
New Bee


Joined: 24 Feb 2014
Posts: 7
Location: Chelmsford, Essex

PostPosted: Tue Apr 29, 2014 7:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Catchercradle, at some point advice from someone more experienced who keeps bees in roughly the same locale in a similar way is always helpful, I'll see if i can make contact.

For example, a lot of Oil Seed Rape is grown here in Essex, and conventional beeks while keen to exploit this flower's early honey cropping potential nevertheless are wary of it's tendency to granulate to the consistency of concrete if left in the comb too long.

Honey harvesting isn't one of my objectives, but my concern is that OSR derived honey left in the hive may be unusable as winter stores or unviable possibly due to the amount of water the overwintering bees would need to gather to soften it in order to consume it, necessitating flights away from the hive during periods of prolonged cold.

Basically, does the prevalence of OSR make non/low intervention Warre beekeeping unrealistic?

Aware that I should probably be posting this query in another part of the forum, so that's exactly what I'll now do!
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catchercradle
Golden Bee


Joined: 31 May 2010
Posts: 1492
Location: Cambridge, UK

PostPosted: Tue Apr 29, 2014 10:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In my experience osr or ivy honey can both be used for the bees during the winter. However I know others have a different view. Ivy tends to set even quicker than OSR. Last winter was mild with enough water around that this wouldn't have been an issue for the bees anyway.

I suspect that it also varies with the bees you have in your hive. That is why I see Phil's advice to if at all possible have bees that have naturally selected themselves to the local conditions rather than been bred for intensive honey production.

All the locals here say that Cambridgeshire bees are very swarmy but I see that as an opportunity rather than a problem.
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Stephen
New Bee


Joined: 24 Feb 2014
Posts: 7
Location: Chelmsford, Essex

PostPosted: Tue Apr 29, 2014 8:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pleasantly refreshing to hear your take on swarming.

Local bees it shall bee!

Many thanks.
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jamesjogi08
New Bee


Joined: 11 Apr 2015
Posts: 1
Location: London

PostPosted: Sat Apr 11, 2015 7:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oil Seed Rape is grown here in Essex, and conventional beeks while keen to exploit this flower's early honey cropping potential nevertheless are wary of it's tendency to granulate to the consistency of concrete if left in the comb too long.





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