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My swarm's not flying

 
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Philippahedger
New Bee


Joined: 02 Mar 2014
Posts: 2
Location: East Sussex UK

PostPosted: Thu Jun 05, 2014 7:58 am    Post subject: My swarm's not flying Reply with quote

Hello everyone. my husband and I caught a swarm from one of our hives on Monday and put them in a hive. It is now Thursday and they haven't moved at all. No flying at all. They are all completely still on the frames. Any ideas what this may be about?
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madasafish
Silver Bee


Joined: 29 Apr 2009
Posts: 880
Location: Stoke On Trent

PostPosted: Thu Jun 05, 2014 8:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Weather.

Stores? If they have none, they will be starving. Feed them.
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biobee
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 1055
Location: UK, England, S. Devon

PostPosted: Thu Jun 05, 2014 10:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

They will be building comb if there were none in the hive. Feeding them is a safe option - if they don't need it, they wont take it.
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sissyblu
New Bee


Joined: 26 Oct 2012
Posts: 5
Location: North Yorkshire, England

PostPosted: Tue Jun 10, 2014 5:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have the same thing happening. We collected a swarm on Saturday evening, drove them 40 miles to our TB hive and the bees seemed to settle in straight away. During sunny spells there have been a few out flying but the majority are still in a ball around the 3 'starter' combs we put nearest the entrance. (We have a perspex viewing window so can see without opening up the hive.)
It's now Tuesday and I was expecting them to have started to forage more than they seem to be doing so I've decided to feed them tonight, just in case. The weather here has been sunny spells interspersed with heavy thundery showers.
If they are just busy building comb, wouldn't there need to be plenty of bees going out to gather construction material or are they likely to be re-moulding what we've given them? Anything else I should be doing besides supplying sugar solution?
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trekmate
Golden Bee


Joined: 30 Nov 2009
Posts: 1125
Location: UK, North Yorkshire, Bentham

PostPosted: Wed Jun 11, 2014 6:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The weather here yesterday wasn't great for bees! Your decision to feed is a good one (if that fits your beekeeping ethic) as the food carried by the swarm will be running out.

Bees don't collect building materials, but need nectar (or sugar as a substitute) to produce wax.

Other things to do? Let them get on with it! Smile

If that was you that sent me a text yesterday (just call me Sherlock!), apologies for the short reply, but I was trying to keep an eye on the dogs across a field!
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sissyblu
New Bee


Joined: 26 Oct 2012
Posts: 5
Location: North Yorkshire, England

PostPosted: Fri Jun 13, 2014 9:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Panic over! After 3 days in a ball in the hive, my new bees have decided they're staying and have ventured out in force! They're also taking the sugar syrup with a vengeance but (unless the weather gets really bad) I'm intending to just keep that going for a few more days until they've sussed out suitable food sources. Is that the right thing to do?

Thanks for the helpful advice and reassurance - much appreciated.
(BTW - I may be a New Bee but I really didn't think bees need bricks and mortar to construct their comb Laughing Honest!)
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Dexter's shed
Scout Bee


Joined: 16 May 2014
Posts: 307
Location: Grays, Essex, UK

PostPosted: Fri Jun 13, 2014 10:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

sissyblu wrote:
Panic over! After 3 days in a ball in the hive, my new bees have decided they're staying and have ventured out in force! They're also taking the sugar syrup with a vengeance but (unless the weather gets really bad) I'm intending to just keep that going for a few more days until they've sussed out suitable food sources. Is that the right thing to do?

Thanks for the helpful advice and reassurance - much appreciated.
(BTW - I may be a New Bee but I really didn't think bees need bricks and mortar to construct their comb Laughing Honest!)


we could really do with more detailed info on the bees, or advice with all be "assuming" which is something you should never do with bees.

so have they built comb?
if so, how much?
it's your call on the feeding, depending on size of colony, but most small swarms need to start building up numbers, feeding syrup, the comb gets filled up with this,less room for the queen to lay,
if it took a single bee a few days to locate a food source, it wouldn't be a very good bee
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