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Entrances to a KHTBH

 
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HowieNZ
Nurse Bee


Joined: 18 May 2014
Posts: 33
Location: Dunedin, New Zealand

PostPosted: Fri Jul 11, 2014 11:38 pm    Post subject: Entrances to a KHTBH Reply with quote

Keeping in mind I have no practical beekeeping experience yet!
What are your current recommendations as to where to place the entrance holes? Reading older posts and Phils plans there is a seems to be an even split to long side low centre entrances with two follower boards and the end entrances low or with high entrances with a periscope with one follow board. I have nearly finished my first KHTBH but yet to decide on entrances. I live in Dunedin New Zealand which while is in the South end of the Southern Hemisphere, - 5 degrees C frosts are about as cold as gets with maybe a few days of snow each winter. Summer it is a very unusual to crack 30 degrees C. It is also unusual to get more than a couple of days rain in a row. Your words of wisdom on this subject are appreciated,
Thanks HowieNZ Smile
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Che Guebuddha
Golden Bee


Joined: 31 Jan 2012
Posts: 1549
Location: Hårlev, Stevns Kommune, Denmark

PostPosted: Sat Jul 12, 2014 6:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
- 5 degrees C frosts are about as cold as gets with maybe a few days of snow each winter. Summer it is a very unusual to crack 30 degrees C. It is also unusual to get more than a couple of days rain in a row.


If there is little rain I would focus on creating a condenser hive with a bottom entrance hole of 30 mm so bees can use up the condensation for water needs. They evaporate large quantities of water and if water is scarce in your locality that will be of great benefit to them.

I would also have a solid bottom so bees can propolize it so condenser box can do its job. I would keep it in semi shaded area in your climate and would have Styrofoam on top of the top bars and a good ventilation under the roof to avoid comb collapse.

Periscope entrance can help if you have issues with robbing by wasps or other bees as well as strong winds. Reduced single entrance can do the same.

Cold is not that much of an issue but strong cold winds are, so place the hives where there is a wind break.

Keep the hives away from pesticide fields!

These are my views others might have more to say.

Happy Buzzing Smile
cheguebeeapiary.blogspot.com
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HowieNZ
Nurse Bee


Joined: 18 May 2014
Posts: 33
Location: Dunedin, New Zealand

PostPosted: Sat Jul 12, 2014 8:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Che for your reply,
Here in Dunedin it does rain on a regular basis but not for days on end. I am planning to give the hives a Warre type roof using untreated wool as absorb excess condensation, I have read the "Sticky" regarding entrances and the good thing is KHTBH are adaptable in regarding where to place them.
I am lucky that the hives are being placed in an organic orchard, however it isn't big enough to avoid the bees flying further into areas where pesticides are no doubt used from time to time, there is plenty of forage in the orchard, as it isn't just fruit trees but has extensive shrubbery planted with bees in mind. The owner has had bees there since 1970, kept in Langstroths but now because of Varoa and maybe other stresses lost her 7 hives last winter and is looking for a better way of keeping bees and is supporting my upcoming beekeeping endeavours.
regards HowieNZ
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MikeRobinson
Foraging Bee


Joined: 01 Apr 2012
Posts: 200
Location: Upper Northwest Georgia, USA

PostPosted: Wed Jul 23, 2014 11:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Three holes, each the size of wine corks, are near the bottom of the sloped sides of my hives. The hives face outward in a semicircle, creating a convenient work-space in the center. The roofs of the hives that I am not working on create tables.

No woodworker would want to look at my hives, which simply sit on cement blocks, on boards which serve to shim them up so that they're level in both axes. They're "sort of" the published dimensions. They're made with found wood, and sealed on the outside with Thompson's Water Seal. Woodworkers wouldn't love 'em. Bees do.

I think it's really important to, "jump in, the water's fine." Do your best to build something nice to keep them in, knowing that you will make mistakes and have some regrets ... but ... start keeping them.
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HowieNZ
Nurse Bee


Joined: 18 May 2014
Posts: 33
Location: Dunedin, New Zealand

PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2014 12:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Smile yup agreed and am as soon as spring comes around and bees are available.
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J Smith
Foraging Bee


Joined: 13 Jan 2014
Posts: 169
Location: New Zealand, South Island, Southland, Riversdale.

PostPosted: Sun Aug 03, 2014 3:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Love your description of Dunedin weather, you just missed one point. The wind can be cold. That is perhaps more of a worry for you than -5 deg C or +30 deg C.
For me it depends on placement of the hive and which is more practical for you given the position- flight path too and from and prevailing winds, available space etc.
Either side or end entrances work, just think of the hive position before deciding.
Che gives good advice above.

Periscope entrances can help cut down wind and help with German Wasp predation if you have them in your neck of the woods. If you don't have them odds are at some stage of the Summer they will find you (at least your hive) if you are urban.
I like to keep entrances on hTBH's at 16mm and in pairs. So two 16 mm holes at each decided position. This allows one to be blanked off when not needed and 1/2" alkathene tubing fits tight into a 16mm hole allowing you to reduce the opening if needed.
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