Please support Friends of the Bees to keep this forum free to use.

Natural Beekeeping International Forum
low-cost, low-impact, balanced beekeeping for everyone

 Forum FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileYour Profile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Please Read The Rules before posting.



(country selected automatically - UK/USA/CA/AU)
Sheep wool insulation?

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> Beginners start here
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Astrid
House Bee


Joined: 21 Jan 2014
Posts: 15
Location: Oslo, Norway

PostPosted: Thu Oct 16, 2014 3:31 pm    Post subject: Sheep wool insulation? Reply with quote

We learn that bees are sensitive to smell. As my TBH is in a very cold climate (Oslo), I am considering to give the hive some extra insulation during winter - at least on the side where I have inspection windows, to minimize condensation. I have some scrap wool directly from a friend's sheep which I can make a blanket from. Will this be too smelly for the bees?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
magger
Nurse Bee


Joined: 30 Mar 2012
Posts: 26
Location: UK East Sussex, Hailsham

PostPosted: Thu Oct 16, 2014 5:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi
I have used scrap sheeps wool as an insulation layer for the past three winters and it has been great. However I did give it a wash. Not very thorough, just to get the worst off. I did this when the weather was good, so the wet wool dried outside, however I have also dried it in the tumble dryer, put it in an old pillow case, tie the top well. I then fluff it up a bit and it stays in the pillow case so making a nice duvet!
I have two pillow case duvets covering the bars, just under the roof, and this year have put another in the space behind the follower board, so I feel the bees are happily tucked up for winter!
Last year I managed to pinch a lovely piece of fleece before it got bagged up. (all the good stuff gets sent off the wool marketing board). Beautiful creamy white, no daggy stuff, just smelt of lanolin. I used that without washing with no problems for the bees.
As we have quite a few sheep I do all sorts of alternative things with daggy bits of wool. It is fantastic to cover empty beds for the winter(the garden variety!) it has transformed our heavy clay soil.
Hope you put it to use
Best wishes
Mary
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Che Guebuddha
Golden Bee


Joined: 31 Jan 2012
Posts: 1549
Location: Hårlev, Stevns Kommune, Denmark

PostPosted: Thu Oct 16, 2014 7:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I used in 2012 raw sheep wool behind the observation window and the bees didnt mind it. The glass broke in the winter because the wood expanded due to humidity and it broke the glass, so Im sure the bees could smell it good, but they still came out of the winter unharmed.

EDIT; here you can see how I insulated with raw wool
http://cheguebeeapiary.blogspot.dk/2012/10/the-last-winterising-bits.html
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Astrid
House Bee


Joined: 21 Jan 2014
Posts: 15
Location: Oslo, Norway

PostPosted: Thu Oct 16, 2014 9:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You are all so helpfull! Thanks! I will give it a wash and go for it!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Che Guebuddha
Golden Bee


Joined: 31 Jan 2012
Posts: 1549
Location: Hårlev, Stevns Kommune, Denmark

PostPosted: Fri Oct 17, 2014 6:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wash it only with warm water several times. Too hot water will damage the wool. Don't use any cleaning products.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
magger
Nurse Bee


Joined: 30 Mar 2012
Posts: 26
Location: UK East Sussex, Hailsham

PostPosted: Fri Oct 17, 2014 7:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, Che is correct, really it is just rinsing the wool. Too hot or too much agitation turns it to felt. However for this purpose a bit of felting doesn't really matter.
Mary
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Paul Reyes
Nurse Bee


Joined: 14 Aug 2014
Posts: 26
Location: Scottsdale, AZ, USA

PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2014 7:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In my bee farm we've always used raw sheep wool to help with the winter and its always worked well. But make sure that you keep it clean so that it doesn't start to smell and irritate the bees.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> Beginners start here All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

SPECIAL OFFER FOR UK FORUM MEMBERS - Buy your protective clothing here and get a special 15% discount! (use the code BAREFOOTBEEKEEPER at checkout and be sure to 'update basket')



Are the big energy companies bleeding you dry?


Is way too much of your hard-earned family income going up in smoke?

Are you worried about what could happen if the ageing grid system fails?

You need to watch this short video NOW to find out how YOU can cut your energy bills TO THE BONE within 30 days!

WATCH THE VIDEO NOW



(country selected automatically - UK/USA/CA/AU)

Conserving wild bees

Research suggests that bumble bee boxes have a very low success rate in actually attracting bees into them. We find that if you create an environment where first of all you can attract mice inside, such as a pile of stones, a drystone wall, paving slabs with intentionally made cavities underneath, this will increase the success rate.

Most bumble bee species need a dry space about the size a football, with a narrow entrance tunnel approximately 2cm in diameter and 20 cm long. Most species nest underground along the base of a linear feature such as a hedge or wall. Sites need to be sheltered and out of direct sunlight.

There is a spectacular display of wild bee hotels here

More about bumblebees and solitary bees here

Information about the Tree Bumblebee (Bombus hypnorum)

Barefoot Beekeeper Podcast



Now available from Lulu.com


Now available from Lulu.com


Now available from Lulu.com


4th Edition paperback now available from Lulu.com

See beekeeping books for details and links to ebook versions.
site map
php. BB © 2001, 2005 php. BB Group

View topic - Sheep wool insulation? - Natural Beekeeping Network Forum