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Eco floor and follower boards

 
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suffo1k
New Bee


Joined: 21 Jan 2015
Posts: 8
Location: UK/Suffolk/Bury St. Edmunds

PostPosted: Wed Jan 21, 2015 8:01 pm    Post subject: Eco floor and follower boards Reply with quote

Hello,
Am using Phil’s 'Building a TBH’ book as reference for my first TBH build.
Just assessing the materials needed, and have a question regarding the follower boards.

I want to add the removable eco floor, so I presume the follower boards will need to be extended.
But I’m unsure by how much? Should they extend right to the mesh at the bottom of the eco floor, or just up to the top of the loose fill material?

Thank you in advance
Matt.
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Adam Rose
Silver Bee


Joined: 09 Oct 2011
Posts: 582
Location: Manchester, UK

PostPosted: Wed Jan 21, 2015 10:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

No, you just fill the eco floor material up to the board.

The board goes to the bottom of the main hive. The eco floor attaches to the bottom of the main hive, and is completely full of organic material, perhaps raked up on each side.
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suffo1k
New Bee


Joined: 21 Jan 2015
Posts: 8
Location: UK/Suffolk/Bury St. Edmunds

PostPosted: Sat Jan 24, 2015 7:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Adam, thanks for that.
Sorry about the late reply - had computer issues (now resolved-hopefully).

Does the flooring material have to be changed often? May influence how I secure it to the main body.

Thanks again,
Matt
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Adam Rose
Silver Bee


Joined: 09 Oct 2011
Posts: 582
Location: Manchester, UK

PostPosted: Sat Jan 24, 2015 8:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

No, you don't replace it. As it rots down you might need to top it up.

With Phil's original design ( as I have ) with a wide mesh at the bottom, it can get quite dry, especially in the summer. You might want to try something which retains the water better. I know Phil was considering some kind of semi permeable material. I don't see what's wrong with a solid, or at least a waterproof, bottom, possibly with drainage holes at each end and possibly with pond liner to prevent or at least delay the wood rotting.
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suffo1k
New Bee


Joined: 21 Jan 2015
Posts: 8
Location: UK/Suffolk/Bury St. Edmunds

PostPosted: Sat Jan 24, 2015 8:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's useful to know.
Will perhaps make modifications, a piece of pondliner with a few perferations on top of the wire mesh?

Thanks for the advice,
Matt
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Adam Rose
Silver Bee


Joined: 09 Oct 2011
Posts: 582
Location: Manchester, UK

PostPosted: Sun Jan 25, 2015 12:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you're going to use pond liner, make sure it goes up each side so that it separates any damp organic material from the wood. Yes, perforated pond liner might well work. It's certainly worth trying - you can always rip it out if you feel it's not working. I staple it on with industrial staples, which you can get from any DIY store.

I have easy access to wood chips, which are relatively big and heavy. People have had problems with light material like saw dust. Phil's latest suggestion, which makes sense to me, is to leave the wood chips on the wood chips outside in a pile for sometime before putting them in, which makes sense to me.
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csturgess
House Bee


Joined: 30 Jun 2014
Posts: 11
Location: somerset, uk

PostPosted: Sun Apr 19, 2015 8:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Considering the material in the floor can you use a mix of wood chippings and leaf mould/twigs such as what is naturally decaying under a tree and not raked up in the autumn?
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AugustC
Silver Bee


Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2015 11:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

have you considered using weed retardant cloth instead of pond liner?
it is quite long lasting and allows for moisture to pass through.
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suffo1k
New Bee


Joined: 21 Jan 2015
Posts: 8
Location: UK/Suffolk/Bury St. Edmunds

PostPosted: Thu May 28, 2015 8:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Found a convenient pile of weathered wood chips (whilst out walking the dog) left over from clearing trees by contractors. An ideal material I think, so the lining not needed.
Thanks to all.
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