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TBH Ireland

 
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greengage
Guard Bee


Joined: 26 Jan 2015
Posts: 62
Location: Ireland

PostPosted: Wed Feb 11, 2015 8:05 am    Post subject: TBH Ireland Reply with quote

As i mentioned earlier Im new to this and plan on having a TBH at home but at work we are getting bees and will probably use National hives, because that is what everyone else uses, (It gets complicated politics) anyway we had a visit from a beekeper to look at our set up and I mentioned TBH, She didnt seem too impressed as there as too much work involved. She also suggested buying swarms, I was hoping to catch one as getting into beekeeping here could cost a lot of money with ,Gear/hives and ancillary equipment, I have seen a number of swarms last year and our visitor caught 18 swarms last year, I dont know if its true or not, anyway ill press on and keep you briefed if your interested, lot more to this than meets the eye, read a recent post here where they mentioned a bee inspector dont know if we have one of these here but did register my hens with the dept (due to H5N1 outbreak a few years ago in Asia) and got a lot of stick for that from another forum but thats another story. Lots of info here good site keep up the good work
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biobee
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 1055
Location: UK, England, S. Devon

PostPosted: Wed Feb 11, 2015 1:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I remember the old tower in the cemetery of Kildare Cathedral...

You could track down Mike Cahn of Carraig Dulra, Co. Wexford (he's on here somewhere...) who has a couple of TBHs and is not so far from you. There are others in Dublin.
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greengage
Guard Bee


Joined: 26 Jan 2015
Posts: 62
Location: Ireland

PostPosted: Wed Feb 11, 2015 5:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hope you enjoyed your visit, Ill have a look for him Tks.
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B kind
Scout Bee


Joined: 13 May 2013
Posts: 250
Location: Co.Wicklow, Ireland

PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2015 7:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

According to local beekeepers last summer was the best honey year for 30 years, The summer started early and pretty much went on and on. There may well have been more swarms than normal last year but this year who knows? We had bees here about 10-15 years ago and between then and having our own bees 2 years ago we never once saw a swarm and rarely a honeybee in the garden.

But, I know of a couple of wild colonies within 10 miles of here that have been going strong for many many years.

As for buying swarms, As you are a gardener I'll put it this way, go to a garden centre and inquire about a plant and they will tell you how much it costs, fair enough, it's a livelihood and it takes time and money to raise plants. Go to a gardener and inquire about a plant, and unless it is rare they will most likely share. In my experience it is much the same with bees.

Quote:
You could track down Mike Cahn of Carraig Dulra, Co. Wexford (he's on here somewhere..


Mike (Co. Wicklow) runs Carraig dulra , http://www.dulra.org/, with his wife Suzie and stops by this forum from time to time.

At this stage we don't know how the long summer will have affected the overwintering of Irish bees and if bees will be in short supply or abundant this summer.

I would be happy to offer you a swarm, as yet I have no idea what this summer will bring, I am still very much in the early days of beekeeping and although there are many gardens within flying distance of our bees our area is primarily agricultural and our own garden is just a drop in the bucket. So I am not counting my chickens before they have hatched!

Quote:
we had a visit from a beekeper to look at our set up and I mentioned TBH, She didnt seem too impressed as there as too much work involved

Horses for courses, each to their own. I cannot say if their is more work as I don't have box hives, ask on this forum if others think they are more work. Bees do take a lot of time, but from what I have read it is more about the approach than the hive that matters.

Kim
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rmcpb
Scout Bee


Joined: 17 Jul 2011
Posts: 447
Location: Blue Mountains, NSW, Australia

PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2015 8:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Bees do take a lot of time, but from what I have read it is more about the approach than the hive that matters.


Wise words there. I use the dreaded Lang because it fits in easier with the other beeks. However, I run it naturally as its how you handle the bees not the box that counts.

Cheers
Rob.
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madasafish
Silver Bee


Joined: 29 Apr 2009
Posts: 880
Location: Stoke On Trent

PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2015 10:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Bees do take a lot of time, but from what I have read it is more about the approach than the hive that matters.


I have 4 full size TBHS and 3 Jumbo Langstroths...(plus a few nucs).

I tend to run bees fairly hands off.. but I do inspect in swarming season as I like to get a honey crop and I don't like chasing swarms.. lost one flying over the nearby school two years ago!

Langs are easier to inspect. More difficult and costly to make. I run foundationless which is cheaper but has occasional problems..

TBH are cheap to make and run but low honey yields I extract mainly in spring and expect to get a bumper crop this year...last year was very good.

Feeding and treating? Langs win hands down.

Assessing stores? Langs win hands down.
Quick inspection - ? My Langs have clear crownboards - so no disruption. Langs win by a mile.

I think Poly Lang hives beat TBHs hands down for bee friendliness...due to the insulation properties- my one poly hive has survived a cool winter (worst week sub -4C this year vs 2012 -16C) much better than my most vigorous TBH - and they are bees which are from the same grandmother..

My TBHs have all insulated roofs and walls..
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biobee
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 1055
Location: UK, England, S. Devon

PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2015 1:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

madasafish wrote:

Langs are easier to inspect. More difficult and costly to make.


Langs are only easier to inspect if:
(a) you only have one box, with no supers
(b) you do it regularly, to prevent propolis build-up
(c) you don't mind the reaction when you expose all the bees at once

Quote:
TBH are cheap to make and run but low honey yields I extract mainly in spring and expect to get a bumper crop this year...last year was very good.


You seem to have contradicted yourself there...

Quote:
Feeding and treating? Langs win hands down.


I disagree. Feeding in a TBH with a jar feeder at one end is very easy, as is placing a feeder on top of the bars with an access hole.

Treating? What's that?

Quote:
Assessing stores? Langs win hands down.
Quick inspection - ? My Langs have clear crownboards - so no disruption. Langs win by a mile.


Assessing stores in a TBH is very easy, and can often be done by hefting.
Quick inspections at both ends - much easier in a TBH, if you don't use plastic lids, and you can have an inspection window, which I have never seen on a Lang.

Quote:
I think Poly Lang hives beat TBHs hands down for bee friendliness...due to the insulation properties- my one poly hive has survived a cool winter (worst week sub -4C this year vs 2012 -16C) much better than my most vigorous TBH - and they are bees which are from the same grandmother..


I have a few poly hives and nucs to start our up-coming Black Bee Project, mainly because our first A.m.m. colonies were supplied in them, but over-insulation means that the queen is less likely to go off-lay and they will have less of a broodless period.

If you are so pro-Lang-poly-treatment, I wonder what your motives may be for posting here at all...
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AugustC
Silver Bee


Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2015 5:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Surely if your primary preference of poly langs over TBH is insulation based you could just better insult your TBH. Unlike most langs the TBHs are what you make them. Make them out of polystyrene if you like..
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madasafish
Silver Bee


Joined: 29 Apr 2009
Posts: 880
Location: Stoke On Trent

PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2015 6:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

biobee wrote:
madasafish wrote:

Langs are easier to inspect. More difficult and costly to make.

...

If you are so pro-Lang-poly-treatment, I wonder what your motives may be for posting here at all...


Seems a failry typicaal childish retort.


I have been keeping tbHs for 5 years.. so have some ideas.
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biobee
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 1055
Location: UK, England, S. Devon

PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2015 7:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

madasafish wrote:


I have been keeping tbHs for 5 years.. so have some ideas.


Then let's hear them, rather than promotion of plastic, frames and chemicals.
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rmcpb
Scout Bee


Joined: 17 Jul 2011
Posts: 447
Location: Blue Mountains, NSW, Australia

PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2015 7:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

To the bees, its a box. Obviously, to us its a statement of who we are. We should get over this argument and get on with treating the bees in a "natural" way.

Cheers
Rob.
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