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Pollen content

 
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Garybt
House Bee


Joined: 16 Dec 2012
Posts: 15
Location: Hornchurch, Essex, UK

PostPosted: Sun Mar 01, 2015 9:38 am    Post subject: Pollen content Reply with quote

Hi I have just read an article regarding top bars which states some disadvantages.
Below is what I have copied and pasted from the article and would appreciate
Any thoughts as I have allergy sufferers in my family.

Honey with High Pollen Content: Since top-bar honey harvesting is done by simply cutting the honey comb, crushing it, and straining the honey, the resulting honey frequently has a very high pollen content, which may not be ideal for individuals with allergies.

Lower Quality Honey: The design of the top-bar hive results in irregular comb sizes which easily break and do not typically fit in most commercially available honey extractors. This means that the resulting honey may not be of the best quality since it’s difficult to purify it commercially.

Thank Gary
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Trip
Foraging Bee


Joined: 19 Mar 2010
Posts: 127
Location: USA, New York, Westchester

PostPosted: Sun Mar 01, 2015 1:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Those are both advantages not disadvantages of Top Bar Hives. Google benefits of pollen and you will see why so many people want minimally filtered and treated honey. I believe Homeopaths and some Allergists use ingested pollen to treat allergies. I also do not think there is enough pollen in a tablespoon of honey to cause anyone's pollen allergies to act up.

As for commercially purified honey, it is so extremely filtered and heated that at some point it isn't really honey anymore so why would you want that?
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Garybt
House Bee


Joined: 16 Dec 2012
Posts: 15
Location: Hornchurch, Essex, UK

PostPosted: Sun Mar 01, 2015 2:39 pm    Post subject: Pollen content Reply with quote

Thanks Trip
I don't see it as a problem myself but it's good to get other people's views.
Hope your bees are getting through your winter ok.
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Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1581
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Sun Mar 01, 2015 3:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gary I have people who come to me for honey because they have allergies(mostly hayfever) and believe that eating local honey containing local pollen will help to desensitise their bodies and improve their condition rather than make it worse. I don't know if there is any science behind it or how effective it is but they keep coming back.

A lot of the cheaper honey on the market has been heat treated and diluted and filtered and then rehydrated until as Trip says it is barely honey anymore. In todays ridiculous society where everything is antibacterial and has to be super clean and sterile, it is a good marketing ploy to suggest that this filtered stuff if better quality(clean and free from impurities etc) but in fact the truth is that those impurities are part of what makes it "honey" and good for you.

Regards

Barbara
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Tavascarow
Silver Bee


Joined: 24 Jun 2008
Posts: 962
Location: UK Cornwall Snozzle

PostPosted: Sun Mar 01, 2015 4:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Honey with High Pollen Content: Since top-bar honey harvesting is done by simply cutting the honey comb, crushing it, and straining the honey, the resulting honey frequently has a very high pollen content, which may not be ideal for individuals with allergies.

This in my humble opinion is completely wrong. Especially regarding hay fever sufferers. A small regular dose of locally sourced natural honey containing local pollen inoculates the sufferer.

Quote:
Lower Quality Honey: The design of the top-bar hive results in irregular comb sizes which easily break and do not typically fit in most commercially available honey extractors. This means that the resulting honey may not be of the best quality since it’s difficult to purify it commercially.
This & the previous quote are completely at opposites.
How can something which is beneficial to human & bee be lower quality?
As Barbara has said commercial honeys are heated to make bottling easier.
This certainly destroys much of the subtle flavours & aromas & possibly health benefits too.
They are also blends of honey from all over the world to enable the producer to achieve a homogonous & repeatable product.
This means the honey doesn't have the advantage of containing the local pollens the sufferer needs.
But most of all regardless of source most large producers micro filter the honey(again when heated) to remove the very pollen you require.
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Tavascarow
Silver Bee


Joined: 24 Jun 2008
Posts: 962
Location: UK Cornwall Snozzle

PostPosted: Sun Mar 01, 2015 4:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Health benefits of bee pollen
Bee pollen as superfood
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Bee happy.
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AugustC
Silver Bee


Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2015 1:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

where is this article so that we might rubbish it directly Smile

An example of a small amount of knowledge being a dangerous thing.
ie
    *Some people are allergic to pollen.
    *Raw honey contains pollen
    *Therefore:
    People are allergic to honey.


I am afraid allergy doesn't work like that. In some cases the presence of pollen
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2015 1:30 pm    Post subject: Re: Pollen content Reply with quote

Garybt wrote:
which may not be ideal for individuals with allergies.


In fact honey is used in apitherapy to heal pollen allergies. You eat local raw honey from October through March. Helps to lower effects of pollen allergies.

Garybt wrote:
This means that the resulting honey may not be of the best quality since it’s difficult to purify it commercially.


Pollen is a valueable protein source and has lots of trace elements. Fermented as bee bread it is most digestable and palatable. So basicly pollen enriches honey as a natural product.

But:
Honey does spoil more quickly with more pollen in it. Honey goes bad more quickly, because pollen brings proteins into the honey and proteins go bad much more easily than does honey alone. Pollen and wax flakes (of crush comb) also act as nucleus of crystallization processes. Honey with a lot of wax and pollen crystallizes more badly.

If you know that, you eat your honey quicker (doesn't get old anyway) and you're fine. It can be a problem if you sell your honey. But there is no reason why the pollen can't be filtered or sieved, straight after the harvest or later when settled in a settling tank. Simply skim the top of the settled honey off.

No worries.
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Garybt
House Bee


Joined: 16 Dec 2012
Posts: 15
Location: Hornchurch, Essex, UK

PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2015 1:33 pm    Post subject: Bee pollen Reply with quote

Below is a link to where the article is

http://howtobee.net/getting-your-beehive/#The_Top-Bar_Hive

Thanks to all who have commented

Gary
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Che Guebuddha
Golden Bee


Joined: 31 Jan 2012
Posts: 1549
Location: Hårlev, Stevns Kommune, Denmark

PostPosted: Fri Mar 06, 2015 10:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Even though you already got good answers here Smile I simply must chime in too;

There are SOOOO MANY myths surrounding horizontal top bar beekeeping, not just about this pollen issue you mentioned but also about it not being good for cold climates and for this and for that and so on ... Beeks in general love to assume a lot it seems and they sure love to spread other beeks believes/assumptions.

As already mentioned honey with pollen (crush'n'strained) will help remedy the pollen allergies. But, BUT Smile it has to be the local honey which contains pollen from local flora.

Im not sure if Im right but I assume that pollen allergy is caused by inhaling pollen and body cant develop immunity that way. This is similar to some beekeeper's family members developing allergy to bee stings because they inhaled the bee venom from the beekeepers clothing (through dust). The body receive low doses of bee venom in the lungs and the body develops C-immuno cells (which leads to venom allergy afterwards) instead of the T-immuno cells which it would develop if one gets stung instead.

That is why at this time I eat/lick Hazel pollen and later Birch pollen right from the tree and make sure to swallow it. I simply shake the catkins into my hand and they leave pollen behind on my hand which I then lick off Smile Best way to let the body adapt to the pollen is to eat pollen.
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