Please support Friends of the Bees to keep this forum free to use.

Natural Beekeeping International Forum
low-cost, low-impact, balanced beekeeping for everyone

 Forum FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileYour Profile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Please Read The Rules before posting.



(country selected automatically - UK/USA/CA/AU)
Please report on use of Linseed/beeswax protection

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> Horizontal top bar hives
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
BridgetB
Scout Bee


Joined: 12 Jul 2010
Posts: 355
Location: UK Cornwall, Falmouth

PostPosted: Sun May 03, 2015 5:44 am    Post subject: Please report on use of Linseed/beeswax protection Reply with quote

I have made 5 cedar hives including legs and they are lasting well without treatment. My latest hive is made entirely of recycled wood. I use the 20:1 Linseed oil to beeswax mixture on my bait hives, but they are indoors during the winter.
I wanted to know after several years of use, how the Linseed oil/bees wax mixture is lasting. Is it protecting the feet of the legs? Does it have to be reapplied? When and how do you do that if bees are in the hive?
Thanks, Bridget
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 3097
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Sun May 03, 2015 6:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Haven't used linseed oil yet, but dipped my topfeeders into ot wax, really cooking them in hot beeswax. It makes the woos perfectly waterproof. For years now. So cooking your hives bodies in hot wax is a real good way to make them very durable.

As I understand, Ickowicz in France does it, too. And Ickowicz is one of Europe's biggest beekeeping supplier.

As I understand the heat drives the wax right into the wood, penetrates and saturates it.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
trekmate
Golden Bee


Joined: 30 Nov 2009
Posts: 1125
Location: UK, North Yorkshire, Bentham

PostPosted: Sun May 03, 2015 7:22 am    Post subject: Re: Please report on use of Linseed/beeswax protection Reply with quote

After four years outside soft wood is discoloured but not rotting (feet are on soil/bark chips and have little damage). I scrape any mildew off and re-coat. The second coat leaves a much darker yellow colour.

If bees are home I re-apply when they are not flying - cool day, early morning, or late evening. Scrape gently and use a level of personal protection you are comfortable with as they may come and have a check on you!

BTW I leave a clear area around the entrance. I've noticed the bees will clean around the entrance (especially above, where they walk before flying) and keep it clean.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1582
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Sun May 03, 2015 10:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I used normal(not marine) 3/8" plywood (it was just stuff that had been left over from another job or reclaimed.... I can't remember buying it!) for the roof of my hive last year and didn't get around to felting it, so I gave it a good coat of linseed and beeswax and there is no sign of warping or delamination yet and it's been out there all winter and repelling the rain nicely. It will definitely need a second coat this summer though or perhaps I will get around to felting it.
I must confess that I coat the lower section of the legs of the hive in Creocote as it's pretty damp here. I always use reclaimed timber and the legs are most likely going to be the first part to rot as they are exposed more.
That same hive is made from varnished tongue and groove panelling that came out of a shop refit(the panelling was thin so I made it double skin with vertical and horizontal lengths screwed together) and the ends are some old bits of sterling board which has also been salvaged. I sealed the inside with beeswax and the outside with linseed and beeswax. I've used old reclaimed 1/4 inch sheets of MDF for followers, again, heavily painted/sealed with hot beeswax and they are great because they don't warp.

I have another one that is made from a veneered chipboard corner cabinet. That has not been treated at all apart from the legs Creocoted. It has a good overhang on the roof (which is felted), so the hive body is really not exposed to the weather much at all.... an advantage of Kenyan TBHs. It is coming into it's fourth year and still solid so far and the body has not been treated at all. There is very slight breakdown of the chip board where I drilled the entrance holes and obviously broke through the veneer, but it's not causing a problem and I envision at least another 4 years of use before I need to do remedial work..... not bad for something that cost me nothing apart from 8 bolts and a bit of time and thought.

I love the idea of soaking hives in a bath of hot wax but unfortunately, not really practical for the average hobby beekeeper and certainly not for a hTBH. Even just cooking the timber before construction would need a bath tub size container with heater and a very large quantity of wax
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
jumbleoak
Scout Bee


Joined: 03 Aug 2010
Posts: 295
Location: UK, England, Kent

PostPosted: Sun May 03, 2015 11:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Barbara wrote:
I love the idea of soaking hives in a bath of hot wax but unfortunately, not really practical for the average hobby beekeeper and certainly not for a hTBH.


No, but the approach is right, i.e. the idea is to get the linseed oil + wax to penetrate as much as possible, rather than just painting the surface. So, e.g. on a flat surface you can really lay it on, as in like a puddle. If you can stand the legs in a container (this is when you are making the hive, of course) then that's good. Etc.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
AugustC
Silver Bee


Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Mon May 04, 2015 9:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Been fine on the hives I have used it for.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> Horizontal top bar hives All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

SPECIAL OFFER FOR UK FORUM MEMBERS - Buy your protective clothing here and get a special 15% discount! (use the code BAREFOOTBEEKEEPER at checkout and be sure to 'update basket')



Are the big energy companies bleeding you dry?


Is way too much of your hard-earned family income going up in smoke?

Are you worried about what could happen if the ageing grid system fails?

You need to watch this short video NOW to find out how YOU can cut your energy bills TO THE BONE within 30 days!

WATCH THE VIDEO NOW



(country selected automatically - UK/USA/CA/AU)

Conserving wild bees

Research suggests that bumble bee boxes have a very low success rate in actually attracting bees into them. We find that if you create an environment where first of all you can attract mice inside, such as a pile of stones, a drystone wall, paving slabs with intentionally made cavities underneath, this will increase the success rate.

Most bumble bee species need a dry space about the size a football, with a narrow entrance tunnel approximately 2cm in diameter and 20 cm long. Most species nest underground along the base of a linear feature such as a hedge or wall. Sites need to be sheltered and out of direct sunlight.

There is a spectacular display of wild bee hotels here

More about bumblebees and solitary bees here

Information about the Tree Bumblebee (Bombus hypnorum)

Barefoot Beekeeper Podcast



Now available from Lulu.com


Now available from Lulu.com


Now available from Lulu.com


4th Edition paperback now available from Lulu.com

See beekeeping books for details and links to ebook versions.
site map
php. BB © 2001, 2005 php. BB Group

View topic - Please report on use of Linseed/beeswax protection - Natural Beekeeping Network Forum