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Exterior finish for TBH

 
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exmar
Nurse Bee


Joined: 16 Apr 2014
Posts: 28
Location: SE Ohio, USA

PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2015 8:39 pm    Post subject: Exterior finish for TBH Reply with quote

Hi Folks,
Finally getting around to finishing the TBH I built last year, it's built, just have to apply a finish or coating to the exterior. I followed the plan in the "Barefoot Beekeeper," legs are PT 2X4, Body is 1" rough sawn oak, lid is 3/4" pine and 1/2" plywood with aluminum flashing. I was going to mix melted beeswax with linseed oil and "treat" the body, however it occurred to me that the Langs I have do OK with exterior latex paint. I have the paint, picking up linseed oil wouldn't be a major issue if that's preferred. Never painted rough sawn wood though. After sitting in the barn for a year, the wood is dry enough to absorb whatever is applied.

If it makes any difference, going to set this up as a "trap hive" with "Swarm Commander" as a lure. Never used that product, however have read enough posts to try it. There are two feral colonies in the woods where I'm going to place it, as we're into swarm season, maybe I'll get lucky.

So, paint or linseed oil/beeswax?

Thanks for your time,

Ev
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R Payne
Foraging Bee


Joined: 11 Apr 2011
Posts: 123
Location: USA, Kansas, Wichita

PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2015 9:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A quality exterior paint will provide a bit more protection for the wood until it needs repainting (a few to several years).
Linseed oil and wax are likely a bit more environmentally friendly but takes many applications to reach the same level of protection and that will take several weeks to fully cure out.

For what it's worth, mine got exterior latex and the bees don't seem to be bothered by that at all.

ron
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Trip
Foraging Bee


Joined: 19 Mar 2010
Posts: 127
Location: USA, New York, Westchester

PostPosted: Tue May 19, 2015 1:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think we obsess way too much about the exterior of our hives. I have hives that have latex paint, linseed oil/wax, and some with nothing. None of them seem any worse off than the others. I do have roofs that keep the water off the hives and legs that keep them up and over any water that splashes on the ground, and my roofs all have either latex or polyurethane coatings. Besides the roof panels I don't think the hive bodies really need anything and what you put on them is mostly for your ethstetic benefit.
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AugustC
Silver Bee


Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Tue May 19, 2015 11:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I tend to use linseed oil with or without beeswax this is as much about ease and cost as anything else. When I have had animal friendly paints (for the chicken house etc) I have used those. I think the linseed oil finish weather nicer and stands out less. This might be useful if your apiary can be seen form a public road and there is a chance of theft.
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exmar
Nurse Bee


Joined: 16 Apr 2014
Posts: 28
Location: SE Ohio, USA

PostPosted: Wed May 20, 2015 2:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the responses. I'll use the latex pain I have, would have to buy linseed oil and always like to use up paint where possible. Hate to send hardened paint off to the landfill. Sad

R. Payne, good "heads up" on repeated applications and drying time. Every couple of years I "paint" the wooden handles of all the stick tools (hoes, rakes, shovels, etc.) with linseed oil and had forgotten how long it takes to soak in and dry.

Thanks again,

Ev
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ingo50
Scout Bee


Joined: 30 May 2014
Posts: 311
Location: Newport, Gwent, Wales, UK

PostPosted: Wed May 20, 2015 9:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Remember to use raw linseed oil and not boiled.
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