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what do i put on a beesting

 
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hannah donovan
Guard Bee


Joined: 01 Apr 2015
Posts: 66
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2015 5:25 pm    Post subject: what do i put on a beesting Reply with quote

hi all
i know there is something you put on a beesting to prevent the other girls from detecting a sting alert... oterwise you get more stings... but i cant remeber what it is i am supposed to use... can someone enlighten me... also what do you all use to ease any pain felt..// THINK ITS LAVENDER OIL..
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ingo50
Scout Bee


Joined: 30 May 2014
Posts: 311
Location: Newport, Gwent, Wales, UK

PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2015 6:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If there is a lot of swelling and itching, take an antihistamine, the once daily type like Loratidine or Certirizine. The are non- drowsy and cheaply available in all supermarkets. A cold compress will also help and bandaging at night will stop you scratching. There are many anti sting lotions and crimes that all work to some effect.
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hannah donovan
Guard Bee


Joined: 01 Apr 2015
Posts: 66
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2015 6:43 pm    Post subject: inigo 50 reply Reply with quote

thankyou..very kind to give me a reply, ... i was looking for what it is you use to cover over the sting smell that alerts other bees to sting you too.. i know phil chandler mentioned it in a vid he did , but i cant remeber which one.. so i know it exhists, just dont know what it is.
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Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1569
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2015 7:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I pick a few leaves off a lemon balm plant that I have growing next to the hives and scrub the sting area with that to mask the smell. Clove oil also works well both as a masking smell which repels the bees and also as a mild anaesthetic. It is a very strong smelling essential oil though and it repels the bees, so probably preferable not to use on your hands whilst doing an inspection.

I do inspections bare handed but scrub my hands with a sprig of lemon balm before I start, to mask my human (honey robber scent). I just give them an extra scrub with a bit more if I get a sting.

I find that stings to the hands are not really much of a problem but stings to the face swell and itch and are sore. I therefore prefer not to risk stings to the face and wear a bee proof suit these days whilst doing inspections.
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ingo50
Scout Bee


Joined: 30 May 2014
Posts: 311
Location: Newport, Gwent, Wales, UK

PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2015 7:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry, I misread your question. I have used my smoker and it has helped in a few tricky situations. Spraying with a weak sugar solution is used by Phil with two or three drops of white birch essential oil.
You may find the following of interest:

Two main alarm pheromones have been identified in honeybee workers. One is released by the Koschevnikov gland, near the sting shaft, and consists of more than 40 chemical compounds, including isopentyl acetate (IPA), butyl acetate, 1-hexanol, n-butanol, 1-octanol, hexyl acetate, octyl acetate, n-pentyl acetate and 2-nonanol. These chemical compounds have low molecular weights, are highly volatile, and appear to be the least specific of all pheromones. Alarm pheromones are released when a bee stings another animal, and attract other bees to the location and causes the other bees to behave defensively, i.e. sting or charge. The alarm pheromone emitted when a bee stings another animal smells like bananas.[5] Smoke can mask the bees' alarm pheromone.

Beware of eating banana and going to the bees, it smells like the alarm pheromone. I tested this recently and at 1 meter from my hives a guard buzzed and butted me. I wasn't planning on working with the bees, so no loss.
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hannah donovan
Guard Bee


Joined: 01 Apr 2015
Posts: 66
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Fri May 22, 2015 3:22 am    Post subject: barbera reply Reply with quote

barbera, i have been told by other bee people that lemon balm is used as a lure for swarms, so not advisable if you want to avoid bees.. as it is an attractant..
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trekmate
Golden Bee


Joined: 30 Nov 2009
Posts: 1123
Location: UK, North Yorkshire, Bentham

PostPosted: Fri May 22, 2015 7:03 am    Post subject: Re: barbera reply Reply with quote

hannah donovan wrote:
barbera, i have been told by other bee people that lemon balm is used as a lure for swarms, so not advisable if you want to avoid bees.. as it is an attractant..

First, accept that you will have bees on your hands during an inspection.

Some smells elicit a calm response (lemon), some a defensive response (banana). I'd rather have friendly, calm bees on me than defensive bees! Wink
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rmcpb
Scout Bee


Joined: 17 Jul 2011
Posts: 447
Location: Blue Mountains, NSW, Australia

PostPosted: Fri May 22, 2015 8:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

When I get stung I scrape the sting out then give the area a few puffs of smoke. Seems to work really well.

Cheers
Rob.
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Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1569
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Fri May 22, 2015 8:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have used lemon balm on my hands now for many years and not had a problem. As Trekmate says, I would rather smell attractive to bees than offensive. I really get just the very occasional bee on my hands during an inspection after I have rubbed them with lemon balm leaves, so don't worry that they are going to run all over you.

As a human, and a woman particularly, you need to be aware of your own smell.... breath, skin and hair.... Lotions and potions and shampoos have so many perfumes in them these days, we almost don't notice and of course our natural animal smells that we are pretty oblivious to, but often the bees do notice. Just something else to be aware of before doing an inspection.

I usually smell of my horses (something many will say aggravates bees) but mine are used to this and in fact I think they get used to both the smell and look of you over time, especially if they are in your garden and you visit them every day.
I have had occasions when I have had visitors to my apiary and after about 5 mins of standing near the hives discussing them, 1 or 2 bees were checking out the strangers.... hovering in front of their faces like they were eyeballing them and occasionally one deciding they didn't like the stranger and being determined to see them off... which is a little embarrassing. Embarassed
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AugustC
Silver Bee


Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Fri May 22, 2015 12:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Honestly the best treatment I have found so far is to get hot water on it (hot as you can for as long as you can) the itching will drive you insane. When you can't take it any more get it in cold water or even better get an ice cube on it. Cool for about 5-10 min and you are good to go. Whenever it starts itching again an ice cube or cold cloth helps.

If you are expecting you "might" get stung taking an antihistamine before you go to your bees is much more effective than waiting til you have been stung. Antihistamines will only inhibit any further histamine reaction not stop reactions already underway.
The best antihistamine for bees stings is chlorphenamine (usually piriton, though store brand generics are exactly the same). If you find you suffer from drowsiness when taking these then cetirizine will do but won't work as well for the itching.
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Dexter's shed
Scout Bee


Joined: 16 May 2014
Posts: 307
Location: Grays, Essex, UK

PostPosted: Fri May 22, 2015 2:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

if your going in with a suit on, then not many stings get through, so carry on as normal
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AugustC
Silver Bee


Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Fri May 22, 2015 3:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

an excellent theory dex which for the most part works.
Though I have had an installation of bees from a bait hive to main hive result in 10 stings through my bee suit. These particular bees wanted to get to me so much they developed a working understaning of velco in the space of 10 mins! that's something I have only just developed and I am 37.
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semiautonomous
Nurse Bee


Joined: 30 Dec 2013
Posts: 44
Location: England, Shropshire, Shrewsbury

PostPosted: Fri May 22, 2015 8:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

AugustC wrote:
an excellent theory dex which for the most part works.
Though I have had an installation of bees from a bait hive to main hive result in 10 stings through my bee suit. These particular bees wanted to get to me so much they developed a working understaning of velco in the space of 10 mins! that's something I have only just developed and I am 37.


Something I discovered too when a little thunder storm blew over while I had one of my hives open once. They felt it a couple of minutes before I heard the first thunder. Got stung 6 times through my smock before I could close up the hive. A good lesson that they can sting me if they really wont too but most of the time choose to be lenient.
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hannah donovan
Guard Bee


Joined: 01 Apr 2015
Posts: 66
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Fri May 22, 2015 11:19 pm    Post subject: thankyou all.. Reply with quote

thankyou for all the replies and interesting info..

i have to let people know i am a natural woman, i dont wear anti perspirant , perfume or hair products, i dont do makeup ... i use chemical free products for my home too..just vinegr and baking powder most of the time..

and i dont smell bad... you dont NEED anti perspiriant, or perfume or make up, or hair products... women seem to not know they can feel good without all the 'trappings'

anyway just saying as i only smell of 'me' to the bees..

and i dont use a smoker as yet.. i dont want to if i can help it.

i havent used a suit , only in the instilation of the swarm in the temp hive as we are begginers.. the rest of the time its just trousers and long sleeved tops, covered feet,.. i will now have a hat on too as the bees tend to get stuck in my hair.. so a hat will hopefully prevent this.

the post has had very intersting results.. and i have also had some great answeers on fcebook groups.. its all great info.

thankyou EVERYONE.
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andy pearce
Silver Bee


Joined: 30 Aug 2009
Posts: 663
Location: UK, East Sussex, Brighton

PostPosted: Fri May 22, 2015 11:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

On a sting put bicarbonate of soda and then fizz it with cider vinegar....gone.
A
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