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Feeding

 
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froggy
House Bee


Joined: 22 Sep 2015
Posts: 11
Location: Dymock, Glos, UK.

PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2015 7:36 am    Post subject: Feeding Reply with quote

Hi, there are a lot of different syrups, feeds etc that appear very expensive . my question is ; it must be cheaper to make your own syrup ? and if so how would you make it ? thanks in advance Terry.
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trekmate
Golden Bee


Joined: 30 Nov 2009
Posts: 1123
Location: UK, North Yorkshire, Bentham

PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2015 10:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, much cheaper to make your own!

For autumn, pour one litre of boiling water onto two kg white sugar. Gently heat to dissolve the last of the sugar, allow to cool before feeding.

For spring/summer use, as above but one kg white sugar and no need to re-heat.

Stronger syrup is used now as there is less water to evaporate to allow the bees to store it.

It's getting toward the time to consider feeding fondant instead: Four kg white sugar, one litre boiling water, heat to dissolve while stirring (you'll need to boil it) and a dessert spoon of glucose syrup. Whisk the mix as it cools, then once it reaches the right consistency pour into suitable containers (I use old margarine tubs).
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froggy
House Bee


Joined: 22 Sep 2015
Posts: 11
Location: Dymock, Glos, UK.

PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2015 1:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's great, many thanks.
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ingo50
Scout Bee


Joined: 30 May 2014
Posts: 311
Location: Newport, Gwent, Wales, UK

PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2015 5:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I make my syrup the same way as John. I use cane rather than beet sugar. I add a good pinch of salt and also one or two Camomille tea bags to make the feed more appealing. I am researching adding more herbs next year. It is probably too late to feed syrup now as the daytime temperatures may not be high enough for the bees to evaporate the water from the syrup, the night time temperatures are also below zero in some areas. I would take the advice of an experienced local mentor. If they do not take the syrup, it may ferment, so you will have to check. What are you using to feed? You may wish use fondant in stead of syrup. If your bees have enough honey stores, feeding may not be required.
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tai haku
Nurse Bee


Joined: 16 Sep 2015
Posts: 35
Location: guernsey

PostPosted: Fri Oct 16, 2015 11:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

thanks for that - I'm using up some pre-prepared fondant I bought from one of the leading suppliers when I first started but can't see the value in paying that amount for it when I now know it's so easy to make!
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trekmate
Golden Bee


Joined: 30 Nov 2009
Posts: 1123
Location: UK, North Yorkshire, Bentham

PostPosted: Fri Oct 16, 2015 2:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

tai haku wrote:

thanks for that - I'm using up some pre-prepared fondant I bought from one of the leading suppliers when I first started but can't see the value in paying that amount for it when I now know it's so easy to make!

Fondant is the hardest to get a good result with by far. It needs quite a bit of boiling and can splash!
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David43
House Bee


Joined: 01 Nov 2015
Posts: 14
Location: USA

PostPosted: Sun Nov 01, 2015 12:46 am    Post subject: Re: Feeding Reply with quote

Two parts of sugar and one part of water. Only raw sugar.
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Balamut
House Bee


Joined: 04 Nov 2015
Posts: 14
Location: usa

PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2015 6:39 pm    Post subject: Re: Feeding Reply with quote

The best food for bees is natural, raw honey.
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newbeekeeper1
House Bee


Joined: 15 Nov 2015
Posts: 13
Location: usa

PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2015 7:46 pm    Post subject: Re: Feeding Reply with quote

I do not feed bees with sugar. Only honey and bee pollen.
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