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varnishing the outside of tbh

 
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freebee
House Bee


Joined: 09 Dec 2015
Posts: 24
Location: The Neterlands, Leeuwarden

PostPosted: Tue Jan 12, 2016 1:15 pm    Post subject: varnishing the outside of tbh Reply with quote

I have varnished the inside of my new hive and there is some left, can I also treat the outside with this mixture? (shellac + propolis + ethyl alcohol)

I am a little bit anxious to use linseed oil, I heared reports that it suddenly can catch fire
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R Payne
Foraging Bee


Joined: 11 Apr 2011
Posts: 123
Location: USA, Kansas, Wichita

PostPosted: Tue Jan 12, 2016 10:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You can use this on the outside, depending on the local conditions it may or may not last past the first season.

As to linseed oil, it can spontaneously combust. This is because it generates heat as it cures. That isn't a problem when put on something, it occurs when a cloth is used to apply the oil and then either thrown in a can or wadded up. If the cloth is spread out to cure where the heat can't build up, the chances of a fire are low. You'll know the applicator has cured when it becomes stiff.

ron
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freebee
House Bee


Joined: 09 Dec 2015
Posts: 24
Location: The Neterlands, Leeuwarden

PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2016 11:12 am    Post subject: varnishing the outside of tbh Reply with quote

thank you for your answer, I thought the hive would go up in flames.
I think it's better to use linseed oil.
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ingo50
Scout Bee


Joined: 30 May 2014
Posts: 311
Location: Newport, Gwent, Wales, UK

PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2016 10:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have used raw linseed oil on my Warre, make sure it is raw and not boiled linseed oil. Let it dry well before introducing any bees.
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freebee
House Bee


Joined: 09 Dec 2015
Posts: 24
Location: The Neterlands, Leeuwarden

PostPosted: Fri Jan 15, 2016 7:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

thanks for this tip!
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Ollie
Foraging Bee


Joined: 27 Nov 2015
Posts: 136
Location: Ireland, west

PostPosted: Fri Jan 15, 2016 9:26 am    Post subject: lin seed oil Reply with quote

Hi

Hope this isn't a silly question but do you only paint the outside with linseed or can you do the inside as well? Im guessing not the inside?
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freebee
House Bee


Joined: 09 Dec 2015
Posts: 24
Location: The Neterlands, Leeuwarden

PostPosted: Fri Jan 15, 2016 10:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I follow Phil Chandlers recommendation to use a mixture of ethyl alcohol, shellac flakes and propolis (1 litre, 250grams and about 50grams)
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biobee
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 1055
Location: UK, England, S. Devon

PostPosted: Fri Jan 15, 2016 11:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That recipe is intended mainly for the interior of the hive. I don't put anything on the outside these days.
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freebee
House Bee


Joined: 09 Dec 2015
Posts: 24
Location: The Neterlands, Leeuwarden

PostPosted: Fri Jan 15, 2016 1:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

can you tell me how long a tbh will last without treatment on the outside?
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biobee
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 1055
Location: UK, England, S. Devon

PostPosted: Fri Jan 15, 2016 2:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It depends on:

1. the type of timber you used to build it

2. your local climate - UV and damp are the enemies of all things

3. how good your roof is at keeping out the weather
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ingo50
Scout Bee


Joined: 30 May 2014
Posts: 311
Location: Newport, Gwent, Wales, UK

PostPosted: Sat Jan 16, 2016 10:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Ollie.
Linseed oil on the outside only. Also best not to have fresh timber. Bees often don't like the smell of it. I have not yet tried Phil's receipe for coating the inside. Bees will coat with propolis themselves , I cannot replicate this, so best if they make it themselves as it is part of their extended immune system.

Regarding longevity of a TBH. Would add that if you can afford Cedar or get it from a local sawmill which is usually cheaper than local merchant, it will last and does not require any treatment. I have used pine for my TBH's ecofloor and painted this. Will be easy to replace if perishes, however so far cedar body holding out well. Good luck Ollie, I used Phil's plans to build mine and you don't need very advanced woodworking skills.
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Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1582
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Sat Jan 16, 2016 1:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a hive that I made out of an old veneered chipboard corner cabinet (I naively thought it was solid teak until I cut into it! Rolling Eyes ) I made a big overhanging roof for it and after 4.5 years untreated, it's holding up fine. I used pine for the legs which were given a coat or two of creosote at the bottom but otherwise it hasn't been treated. You could also consider scorching as a means of preserving.

I agree with Phil that treating may not be necessary if you have a good roof on it, as with a Kenyan style top bar hive, there is very little of it exposed to the elements that will cause it to rot/degrade.
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Bruce_S
House Bee


Joined: 04 Jun 2016
Posts: 11
Location: New York, USA

PostPosted: Mon Jun 06, 2016 1:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

One of my sons and I recently made two top bar hives of cedar. I applied a couple of coats of pure tung oil to all the external surfaces. It resulted in a transparent, waterproof finish accentuating the natural colors of the cedar. We've had several severe thunderstorms in April, May and early June and the surface, so far, looks like the day I applied the tung oil in early April. We'll see how it holds up after a winter or two. It is often very cold, snowy and icy during the winter where we live in New York in the lower Hudson Valley. [/img]
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