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Entrance holes PC hTBH

 
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BuffBum
Guard Bee


Joined: 10 Nov 2015
Posts: 62
Location: Quarry Bank, West Midlands, UK

PostPosted: Fri Feb 05, 2016 4:29 pm    Post subject: Entrance holes PC hTBH Reply with quote

The plans call for the three holes in the long front side to be in the centre 22mm dia and at 50mm centres. On the plan image they look further apart.
So I am undecided how far apart to space them and also a measurement from the bottom edge of the board. Any suggestions.
Cheers

Cool


Last edited by BuffBum on Mon Feb 08, 2016 3:53 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1564
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Fri Feb 05, 2016 8:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi

I think most of us in colder climates have moved away from centre entrances and now use end entrances either a few inches from the ends on the sloping side or in the vertical face. The main reason for this is that the colony then grows in just one direction and the majority of honey stores are placed at the back of the hive, whereas with centre entrances, honey is often stored on both sides of the brood nest. This isn't a problem if you have mild winters when the bees can move back across the empty hive once they have eaten all the honey at one end, but in cold climates they can get isolated at one end and starve to death when there is honey at the other end that they can't get to.
The down side to end entrances is that you can't do a split as easily in the same hive.

You might also want to consider what has been termed the "periscope" entrance. The idea of this is that the entrance holes into the hive are drilled half way up or even near the top of the hive and then a box cover is fitted with holes in the bottom or even an open bottom. The advantage of this is that it creates a baffle for wind etc and makes it more difficult for wasps and robber bees to get into the hive.

There are so many different options as regards entrances that it's really a case of trying different locations and seeing what works best for you and your bees but don't get too bogged down about them being a set spacing apart, or even diameter as long as you have stoppers handy to block them up or half block them or even three quarter block them as required, which is why wine cork size holes works so well... corks are easily cut in half or a quarter notched out. I drilled 3 holes in a triangular formation rather than all in a line in one of my hives, it really doesn't matter that much. You could even drill 9 or 10 smaller holes which the bees could easily close up with propolis and wax if they didn't like them all.

I've also drilled new entrance holes in hives that were already occupied, when I found I needed a different configuration.

When you start out with a swarm or a nuc, you are probably only going to want one hole open anyway until they have build up into a strong colony.

That is all probably not much help to you, but I guess I'm trying to say that the bees aren't going to get their tape measures out and tell you, you got the spacing or the diameter or the location of the entrance holes wrong. Ideas are constantly evolving on hive design and which ever plans you follow, there will be people who have modified it to better suit their circumstances and conditions.... for example, many of us are moving away from mesh floors and either returning to using solid floors or a deep litter floor.... the design/make up of the latter is still being experimented with.

Regards

Barbara
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Michael Dreyer
House Bee


Joined: 21 Aug 2014
Posts: 13
Location: Bremen, Germany

PostPosted: Sun Feb 07, 2016 7:28 pm    Post subject: End entrances in the vertical face Reply with quote

Hi Barbara,

you mentioned that "now use end entrances either a few inches from the ends on the sloping side or in the vertical face".
I was thinking about that too for my next TBH construction.
In using the entrance in the vertical face how would you inspect the brood nest combs from that side because you don't have a false back on that end but the very first brood nest comb is touching the vertical face.
Because you wouldn't move all the combs back.
Is that a problem anyhow? Inspecting the honey combs is no problem because you have a false back on the other side there. Greetings Michael
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Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1564
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2016 2:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Michael

I use 2 follower boards. The first one is spaced a blank top bar or two in from the entrance, with entrance holes drilled through it, although to be fair, my follower boards are never a perfect fit so there is usually access around it in places as well. This creates a similar feature to the periscope entrance in that there is a baffle between the exterior entrance and the interior one. I drilled holes near the top of my follower and have exterior entrance holes at the bottom, so bees enter, climb upwards in what is essentially an entrance hall area and then enter the broodnest through the follower near the top. To inspect, I just remove the blank top bar covering that area and then move back or remove the follower to gain access to the brood nest for inspection.

Hope that makes sense

Regards

Barbara
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masimcox
House Bee


Joined: 13 Apr 2015
Posts: 11
Location: Powys, Wales, UK

PostPosted: Thu Apr 07, 2016 11:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

How do you prevent the bees from building on the first, blank, top bar before the following board?
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AugustC
Silver Bee


Joined: 08 Jul 2013
Posts: 613
Location: Malton, North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Fri Apr 08, 2016 10:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

you don't need to. they don't seem to consider this area to be part of the "greater hive"
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