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Natural other-stuff...

 
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Beeblebrox
Guard Bee


Joined: 25 Sep 2010
Posts: 60
Location: UK - north Oxfordshire

PostPosted: Mon Dec 01, 2014 4:51 pm    Post subject: Natural other-stuff... Reply with quote

I was talking to a random stranger the other day explaining about the differences between natural and conventional beekeeping.

"That's interesting" they remarked: "There is a similar split in the care of horses. For example, should you shoe a horse, or give it a coat. I had a lame horse which was written off by the conventional horse community. I had its shoes taken off and it is fine now, with occasional hoof-clipping."

Makes you wonder how many other activities there are to ours facing parallel issues.
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Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1567
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2014 3:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I try to follow a more natural approach to my horse management too although I do have one horse that cannot manage without shoes and I do have rugs for my older retired horses which are out in all weather with very little shelter. Cold wet windy weather is harder on animals than cold snowy/icy weather. The "them and us" also applies to methods of training horses ie classical verses natural and that can be pretty contentious. I'm often devils advocate between my sister who is natural and my partner who is more conventional.

Also just got back into poultry keeping and trying to keep that as natural as possible as well but have a lot of learning to do still. There is definitely a dominant group of people on the poultry forum I visit, who advocate throwing chemicals, antibiotics and sevin dust at anything and everything before they actually know what the problem is with their or someone else's chickens and belittle other natural remedies.

Also of course there is a huge trend towards small scale organic gardening, so I think there it is a growing movement across all aspects of land and animal husbandry towards a more natural approach, but with any change there is always resistance and ridicule from the established community.

I also think that a lot of it stems from people approaching these interests from a leisure perspective with no economic pressures. Once money and profit is involved, then quick fixes are much more attractive and more easily sold.
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frazier
New Bee


Joined: 01 Dec 2016
Posts: 3
Location: Richmond, Illinois

PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2016 3:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Barbara wrote:
... a huge trend towards small scale organic gardening...
You can count me in this camp! We had some medium-to-good success last year using "natural" methods to ward off tomato blight. At the garden centers they told us it wouldn't work, but at least we weren't applying toxic fungicides after every rain, as was recommended.

Quote:
I also think that a lot of it stems from people approaching these interests from a leisure perspective with no economic pressures.
Also true. As a home beer and mead brewer, the "economies of scale" can work in my favor: If I want to spend an extra $5 in ingredients on a batch, I can shrug that cost off. But for InBev, that dollar per gallon costs them millions, so they won't do it.

Cheers!
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catchercradle
Golden Bee


Joined: 31 May 2010
Posts: 1487
Location: Cambridge, UK

PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 2017 8:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

With horses, and shoes, it depends not only on the type of horse but what the horse is doing. With the right environment/combination of exercise it should be no surprise that a horse can manage without shoes or trimming but most horses these days have been bred for specific purposes and their exercise/environment pattern won't keep their hooves in good condition. I do know a number of people with horses where they only have to trim and not shoe however.

I see that one as not being about whether natural is best but rather doing the best for the other variables in the equation.

As to my bees, I haven't treated for mites for about 5 years and haven't fed for three. I do check the hives in the winter from time to time to check they don't need feeding however.
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biobee
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 1051
Location: UK, England, S. Devon

PostPosted: Wed Jan 04, 2017 11:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think this underlines the difference between working from basic principles, which may include "if in doubt, go for the option that seems to work best in nature", rather than hard-and-fast rules applied without question.
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