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Feeling sad!

 
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BridgetB
Scout Bee


Joined: 12 Jul 2010
Posts: 355
Location: UK Cornwall, Falmouth

PostPosted: Wed Jun 01, 2016 6:34 pm    Post subject: Feeling sad! Reply with quote

This time last year, I was very excited to be able to install a colony in a garden open to the public. I got the impression that the garden was keen on bees and the environment, as was the farmer next door.

That first swarm didn't come to anything, so I took a second swarm. This one had chalk brood, never really got off the ground and died over the winter. So this year I decided to actually move an established colony that was thriving. It faded and I found bees dead and dying on the ground. There is a small remnant left which is still going. To my horror, all the vegetation in the field next to where the bees are, died. Obviously sprayed - but I had not been warned! I emailed the garden and have just received the reply. Sprays are also used in the garden. Round Up certainly and others. They do it early and when there is little wind. - All I know is that I have not been informed about when they were going to be used.

It is hard because bees do die. One colony died in my own garden where there are no sprays round about (I don't think!), so it is hard to say for definite the cause of death. But three attempts to get colonies established there? ( I collected some of the dead bees and they are in my freezer. Does anyone do tests for toxins?)

Has anyone else experience in dealing with gardens open to the public?
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BridgetB
Scout Bee


Joined: 12 Jul 2010
Posts: 355
Location: UK Cornwall, Falmouth

PostPosted: Thu Jun 02, 2016 2:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here I am awake and worrying (3.15am!)

The reason I had offered to take bees to this garden was because I had not seen any honey bees on the flowers in the garden. I had thought it was due to a lack of bees. Maybe it was more to do with the poisonous environment! - keeping the garden pristine for the visitors! My daughter says I should scoop my bees up and bring them home! Not such an easy scoop with a top bar hive, yet not that difficult.
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Ollie
Foraging Bee


Joined: 27 Nov 2015
Posts: 136
Location: Ireland, west

PostPosted: Thu Jun 02, 2016 8:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry to hear that Bridget. Lesson learned I suppose and advice to anyone else who wants to have bees in a public garden, check before for spraying... Thankfully in my area they don't tend to use sprays as its all beef cattle and sheep.
Anyway good luck getting the TB home and repopulated soon.

Ollie
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catchercradle
Golden Bee


Joined: 31 May 2010
Posts: 1487
Location: Cambridge, UK

PostPosted: Thu Jun 02, 2016 11:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So sad. I am lucky in that the community Orchard I have just put a swarm into is managed for wildlife and dealing with pests means walking round the young apple trees and picking them off by hand. Once a year the trees are sprayed with a garlic spray that is organic and that isn't done when they are in flower.

Our growing community (when new developments are complete it will be three times the size it was when we moved in) also has a country park managed by the wildlife trusts with some old trees with hollows that I hope to populate with some swarms if I get enough to have extra after giving away some to those who are looking for them.
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luk_lak
Guard Bee


Joined: 06 Dec 2013
Posts: 85
Location: Isle of Dogs, London, UK

PostPosted: Thu Jun 02, 2016 3:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry to hear that

38 degrees actually running campaign to ban roundup to be sprayed in parks of my borough Tower Hamlets.

https://you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/ban-dangerous-pesticides-in-tower-hamlets

Please support it and maybe create/ask them to make one for your region?
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BridgetB
Scout Bee


Joined: 12 Jul 2010
Posts: 355
Location: UK Cornwall, Falmouth

PostPosted: Tue Jun 07, 2016 7:32 pm    Post subject: Recovery!! Reply with quote

Well - good news - I checked the colony today and they are rebounding! Very Happy I didn't remove the bees, I calmed down and then thought that the evidence of poisoning the bees may stimulate those concerned into a more organic approach to the land. I have a meeting on Thursday to see what they say. I have a spare swarm which I would contemplate taking there if their attitude is more hopeful. We shall see.
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