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Modular Horizontal hive

 
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velacreations
Guard Bee


Joined: 25 Sep 2009
Posts: 56
Location: Mexico, Chihuahua

PostPosted: Sun Aug 21, 2016 2:04 pm    Post subject: Modular Horizontal hive Reply with quote

I came across this hive, they call it the "bee barrel", but it's basically a modular hive design. There's essentially one piece you create, the hexagon frame/section, and then they stack together.

I love this idea, because it's essentially one piece that is replicated over and over. No different size boxes, floors, roofs, frames, etc, just the one piece. You can expand or shrink hives anything you want, and due to the design.

The hexagon shape is good for hanging on the stand they use, but I think you could play with it a bit and make it even easier to create. Using some sort of UV plastic would make these lightweight and easy to mass produce.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4FKwSIw-rSc

There's not much info on their website, but here it is: https://www.beescientific.net/
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JGW07
Scout Bee


Joined: 06 Apr 2010
Posts: 270
Location: USA, GA, Hephzibah

PostPosted: Sun Aug 21, 2016 6:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's definitely a new take on the beehive, and I do see merit in the design for those who want to use foundation and aren't into natural or building their own hives, but he demonstrates it with a very small colony. I'd like to see him do an inspection with 50,000+ bees and then put it all back together. Very interesting. Thanks for sharing.
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velacreations
Guard Bee


Joined: 25 Sep 2009
Posts: 56
Location: Mexico, Chihuahua

PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2016 1:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think you could do a foundation-less approach with this if you had starter strips in the right spots.

I really love the modular aspect of this hive construction, and really, you could make them bigger or different shapes if you wanted. You have a limited size if you want to lift them, but if no lifting is required, put them on a stand, and you could add "frames" as you wanted/needed and could have a very large hive.

I'm looking at this from a DIY approach. Figure out materials and a jig, and make as many as you need.
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madasafish
Silver Bee


Joined: 29 Apr 2009
Posts: 880
Location: Stoke On Trent

PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2016 11:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

expensive and my other comment is "why bother"?
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AndyC
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Joined: 04 Jul 2014
Posts: 301
Location: Uk/Horsham/RH13

PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2016 3:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why bother?

Because there's is always something to learn and something to be improved.

Looks like an innovative and sensible approach.
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velacreations
Guard Bee


Joined: 25 Sep 2009
Posts: 56
Location: Mexico, Chihuahua

PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2016 3:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I liked the concept because it was one piece of hive to build. Essentially, you just copy one piece as many times as you want.
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JGW07
Scout Bee


Joined: 06 Apr 2010
Posts: 270
Location: USA, GA, Hephzibah

PostPosted: Wed Aug 24, 2016 2:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the end, I see this more as a novelty because the cost would be prohibitive for many hives. And like I said before, I can't see putting this thing back together with thousands of bees squirming all around the edges.
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tai haku
Nurse Bee


Joined: 16 Sep 2015
Posts: 35
Location: guernsey

PostPosted: Thu Feb 16, 2017 10:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

JGW07 wrote:
In the end, I see this more as a novelty because the cost would be prohibitive for many hives. And like I said before, I can't see putting this thing back together with thousands of bees squirming all around the edges.


also it feels like there is a bit more risk of losing a queen with this system; either squished in the edges or dropped off between rings when they get split and handled.
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Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1574
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Thu Feb 16, 2017 12:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
also it feels like there is a bit more risk of losing a queen with this system

I agree. I cringed when he cracked all the units apart to start with and then picked them up and stacked them horizontally. Far too easy to lose your queen but also, the nectar is going to run out all over everywhere by stacking them horizontally like that.

I think it is a really neat bit of design, but I'm interested in simplifying things rather than making them more complicated. The cost of such a hive would be prohibitive for me and a DIY build too complicated, particularly the level of precision required for each "frame". I'm getting older and lifting units like this full of honey, no longer appeals to me. Also, the frames will not fit a standard extractor, so you are going to have to crush and strain anyway.

With the modules stacking like that, I'm pretty sure they may swarm rather than move into a supered module with so little area of transit between the "barrels"...just those few holes, so I'm assuming you would have to move frames up into the barrel placed above to encourage them to draw comb in there and utilise the space. There is no facility for an observation window, which I absolutely love in my horizontal top bar hives. The barrel seems to be moved from it's site onto the inspection bench which will cause some confusion for returning foragers at the original site until it is returned....again it could lead to queen loss if queen is on mating flight.

Overall, I don't find a little brace comb in my horizontal top bar hives sufficient of a problem to warrant the cost or complication of this design. I don't like heavy lifting of multiple frames filled with honey and I would imagine there is a risk of cross comb in this hive much as there would be in a normal TBH unless you use foundation sheets.
I do quite like the domed roof but this has been covered in the Cathedral Hive so it's not a unique feature of this design.
I will be interested to hear reports from anyone who buys or makes one of these as to how they find it in practice.
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AndyC
Scout Bee


Joined: 04 Jul 2014
Posts: 301
Location: Uk/Horsham/RH13

PostPosted: Thu Feb 16, 2017 1:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Saw this design a while ago.

Seems over complicated to me, which is a shame as a more modular design is an appealing idea.

Anyone using the Japanese type hive here in the U.K?

That has a top, bottom and all boxes the same.
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